Author Topic: Οὗτος Ἰουστῖνον καὶ Νεοβιγάστην στρατηγοὺς προβαλόμενος, καὶ τὰς Βρεττανίας ἐάσας, περαιοῦται ἅμα τῶν αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ Βονωνίαν ->He appointed Justinus and Neovigastes as generals, and leaving Britain, crossed with his forces to Bononia.(Olympiodorus/Photius)  (Read 756 times)

claudius

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I’m working on a research in which I also try to analyze a “vexata quaestio” that puzzled many historians:
with whom the usurper Constantine III went when he left Britain to Gaul – was he with a full army or with a couple of generals to be put at the head of the troops stationed in Gaul?

On the net I found this translation of a passage by Olympiodorus: “he appointed Justinus and Neovigastes as generals, and leaving Britain, crossed with his forces to Bononia.”

The original Greek text reads: “Οὗτος Ἰουστῖνον καὶ Νεοβιγάστην στρατηγοὺς προβαλόμενος, καὶ τὰς Βρεττανίας ἐάσας, περαιοῦται ἅμα τῶν αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ Βονωνίαν.”

I’m wondering if “ἅμα τῶν αὐτοῦ” is correctly rendered as “with his forces, [= with his own men]” or has to be rendered as “together with them,” where them would stand for the two generals. My Greek is too poor to solve the question, so I hope to get a help from you.

Thanks in advance, claudius
« Last Edit: 23 Mar, 2012, 21:16:57 by billberg23 »


billberg23

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I’m wondering if “ἅμα τῶν αὐτοῦ” is correctly rendered as “with his forces, [= with his own men]” or has to be rendered as “together with them,” where them would stand for the two generals.
Welcome to the Forum, claudius!
The phrase ἅμα τῶν αὐτοῦ must mean "together with his forces" (literally, "together with those of him").  If it had meant "together with them," referring to the two generals, it should have read ἅμα (or μετὰ) αὐτῶν.
Incidentally, this seems to be from Photius (Bibliotheca Codex 80, Bekker page 57b, lines 18ff.) rather than from Olympiodorus, who was a philosopher, not an historian.
Τί δέ τις; Τί δ' οὔ τις; Σκιᾶς ὄναρ ἄνθρωπος. — Πίνδαρος

claudius

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Thank you billberg. I needed your answer.

By the way, I think we are both right on the Greek author. In his epitome Photius quotes this passage, usually known as fragment 12 of Olympiodosus of Thebes. Those fragments are the only extant writings by Olympiodorus the historian, not the later philosopher.



claudius

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« Last Edit: 23 Mar, 2012, 20:38:55 by claudius »