Author Topic: Days of the week in Greek: Κυριακή, Δευτέρα, Τρίτη, Τετάρτη, Πέμπτη, Παρασκευή, Σάββατο  (Read 39563 times)

ruadisneyfan

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Days of the week in Greek: Κυριακή, Δευτέρα, Τρίτη, Τετάρτη, Πέμπτη, Παρασκευή, Σάββατο

Thanks everyone.

Sunday =  Κυριακή (KeeriakEE)
Monday =  Δευτέρα (DehFTEhra)
Tuesday = Τρίτη (TREEtee)
Wednesday = Τετάρτη (TeTArtee)
Thursday = Πέμπτη (PEmptee)
Friday = Παρασκευή (ParaskeVEE)
Saturday = Σάββατο (SAvatoh)
« Last Edit: 14 Jul, 2012, 01:56:45 by spiros »


wings

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Απ: days of the week in Greek
« Reply #1 on: 14 Mar, 2006, 15:11:28 »
Please read the forum rules very carefully. The subject line should include only the terms you are asking about. Before posting this type of questions, look the words up in an English-Greek dictionary in our home page and then use any of the various online tools to have them transliterated. Thanks in advance for your understanding.
« Last Edit: 03 Mar, 2012, 23:59:34 by spiros »

banned8

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Re: days of the week in Greek
« Reply #2 on: 14 Mar, 2006, 15:27:51 »
I hate those h's lest people should start pronouncing Trite to rhyme with myth:

Here's from another page:

The Greek name for Sunday, Kyriake, means Lord's day
Monday - Deutera - Second
Tuesday - Trite - Third
Wednesday- Tetarte - Fourth
Thursday - Pempte - Fifth
Friday - Paraskeue - Preparation
Saturday - Sabbaton - Sabbath

Pronunciation in Greek:
KiriakEE
DeftEra
TrEEti
TetArti
PEmpti
ParaskevEE
SAvato
(Stress falls on upper-case vowels)


wings

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Απ: days of the week in Greek
« Reply #3 on: 14 Mar, 2006, 15:35:41 »
Nick, "ruadisneyfan" asked for the transliterated forms only, not the pronunciation of the words.

And why "TrEEti" and not "Triti"? This is not supposed to be a long vowel sound.

banned8

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Re: days of the week in Greek
« Reply #4 on: 14 Mar, 2006, 15:42:49 »
I use EE to show the accented /i/ sound because a single "I" might be pronounced as /ai/ in "trite" (the English word).

And I hate any transliteration that turns an eta into an aitch.

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Απ: days of the week in Greek
« Reply #5 on: 14 Mar, 2006, 15:46:46 »
Well, I hate transliteration in general. :-) But again it depends on the method of transliteration and, though I am not interested in them, I have seen there are quite many.


tommydude2112

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Re: Απ: days of the week in Greek
« Reply #6 on: 03 Mar, 2012, 23:27:54 »
This is really really helpful but I read somewhere that when referring to time you must use the article with the day of the week: if this is true or not, please can you tell me what gender all these days are?
« Last Edit: 03 Mar, 2012, 23:43:16 by spiros »

spiros

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Re: days of the week in Greek
« Reply #7 on: 03 Mar, 2012, 23:43:53 »
Sunday =  η Κυριακή
Monday = η Δευτέρα
Tuesday = η Τρίτη
Wednesday = η Τετάρτη
Thursday = η Πέμπτη
Friday = η Παρασκευή
Saturday = το Σάββατο

The above is nominative case; if you are not aware of cases or Greek, it is too complex really to analyse the correct usage unless you have a specific phrase in mind you want translated.
« Last Edit: 04 Mar, 2012, 00:11:42 by spiros »