Author Topic: Tattoos and Ancient Greek  (Read 849615 times)

sniperone

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1710 on: 26 Feb, 2009, 20:55:34 »
Ok thanks billberg23,

I have previously looked at some of those links but can't find the following in capitals.

Ἀνακεῖται ἡ πάντων τύχη ἐφ' ὄτῳ τρόπῳ ἑαυτόν παρέχει ἕκαστος - Can you please confirm this translates to "Upon the conduct of each depends the fate of all" and is it possible to change it into capitals, please.


ΟΥΔΕΝ ΤΟΙΣ ΘΑΡΡΟΥΣΙΝ ΑΝΑΛΩΤΟΝ - I think this means "there is nothing impossible to him who will try" Is that correct?
Is this the original script that you are talking about? I was aiming for "There is nothing that cannot be seized by them who have the courage" or is that just two ways of translating the original?

Sorry for being a pain but I wish to commit this to my skin so I want to be sure of what it means first.

Thanks again.


billberg23

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1711 on: 26 Feb, 2009, 23:00:34 »
Ἀνακεῖται ἡ πάντων τύχη ἐφ' ὄτῳ τρόπῳ ἑαυτόν παρέχει ἕκαστος - Can you please confirm this translates to "Upon the conduct of each depends the fate of all" and is it possible to change it into capitals, please.
Confirmed.  And here it is in upper case:

ΑΝΑΚΕΙΤΑΙ  Η  ΠΑΝΤΩΝ  ΤΥΧΗ  ΕΦ  ΟΤΩΙ  ΤΡΟΠΩΙ  ΕΑΥΤΟΝ   ΠΑΡΕΧΕΙ  ΕΚΑΣΤΟΣ

Quote
ΟΥΔΕΝ ΤΟΙΣ ΘΑΡΡΟΥΣΙΝ ΑΝΑΛΩΤΟΝ - I think this means "there is nothing impossible to him who will try" Is that correct?  Is this the original script that you are talking about? I was aiming for "There is nothing that cannot be seized by them who have the courage" or is that just two ways of translating the original?
Yes, it's just different ways of translating the original, which says (as literally as I can do it) "Nothing to those with courage is not-to-be-seized."
The script is the same upper case that's been in use for more than two millenia.
Τί δέ τις; Τί δ' οὔ τις; Σκιᾶς ὄναρ ἄνθρωπος. — Πίνδαρος

HildeMarie

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1712 on: 27 Feb, 2009, 20:15:18 »
Hi again :-)

I need your help and i hope someone can give it to me :-)

On Tuesday i'm going to get my tattoo of the word goddess in Greek, and i've got a jpeg file of it before. But my Q is, can i have it again but now in a more feminine script like 'Kunstler script' who is in Word? I have my kids name in Norwegian tattoo'ed in that lettering and i love it, so i would like to get this one in that lettering/script as well :-)

Hope someone can help, thanks :-)
« Last Edit: 20 Mar, 2009, 20:46:26 by spiros »


amymon87

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1713 on: 27 Feb, 2009, 22:34:01 »
I'm really loth to force this famous last line of Tennyson's Ulysses into a dead language, for it deserves to remain in its original tongue.  I will, however, give you ancient Greek equivalents for the component parts:
To strive:  σπουδάζεσθαι
To seek:  ζητεῖν
To find:  εὑρεῖν
Not to yield:  μὴ ἐνδοῦναι

Thank you for your help billberg23. Can I just ask what is the difference between the translation that you did for me and another one on the tread
ἀγωνίζεσθαι, ἐπιζητεῖν, εὑρίσκειν καί μή εἴκειν
Is this wrong? I obviously have no idea and really want to make sure I get the tattoo right (for obvious reasons). Just to let you know the reason that I chose ancient greek is because I have just completed a degree in Maths and obviously it is revelant to my own life.
Thank you again in advance.

sniperone

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1714 on: 28 Feb, 2009, 00:11:13 »
Thanks very much you have been a very great help to me. Much appreciated.

billberg23

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1715 on: 28 Feb, 2009, 02:25:39 »
Can I just ask what is the difference between the translation that you did for me and another one on the tread
ἀγωνίζεσθαι, ἐπιζητεῖν, εὑρίσκειν καί μή εἴκειν
Is this wrong?
Not at all.  As with any language, there's more than one way to say almost anything in Greek.  I myself prefer vbd's ἀγωνίζεσθαι to my σπουδάζεσθαι, because ἀγωνίζεσθαι embodies more of the idea of struggle.  The difference between ζητεῖν and ἐπιζητεῖν is simply the difference between "seek" and "seek after."  Eὑρίσκειν means "to keep finding" and εὑρεῖν means "to find."  Eἴκειν means "to give way" and ἐνδοῦναι means "to concede."  So pay your money and take your choice, amymon!  (-:





sniperone

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1716 on: 01 Mar, 2009, 14:23:37 »
Does anyone have Lithos font to put my other quotes in?

sniperone

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1717 on: 03 Mar, 2009, 15:07:34 »
Does anyone know if there is an actual text that contains this quote. It is said to be a quote from Alexander the great but I just wondered if there was an actual ancient Greek text with it in.

"Upon the conduct of each depends the fate of all"

oberonsghost

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1718 on: 10 Mar, 2009, 14:01:35 »
Does anyone have Lithos font to put my other quotes in?

Hi there,

I've set the two quotes in Lithos Pro.....in the attached PDF.....

http://idisk.mac.com/mconidaris//Public/sampler.pdf
Πουλιὰ τὸ βάρος τῆς καρδιᾶς μας ψυλὰ μηδενίζοντας καὶ πολὺ γαλάζιο ποὺ ἀγαπήσαμε!  (Ἐλύτης)

sniperone

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1719 on: 11 Mar, 2009, 00:22:35 »
Cheers, thanks alot. That is a great help just what I wanted.

Flamekeeper24_7

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1720 on: 14 Mar, 2009, 21:53:42 »
For the tattoo I want I'm trying to find the correct greek translation for the scripture from Philippians 1:21: "For me to live is Christ and to die is gain." Does anyone have the right greek translation?

oberonsghost

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1721 on: 14 Mar, 2009, 22:02:55 »
This is the phrase you are looking for:

ἐμοὶ γὰρ τὸ ζῆν Χριστὸς καὶ τὸ ἀποθανεῖν κέρδος

http://biblos.com/philippians/1-21.htm

Draco421

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I have survived a hell that you can only dream of
« Reply #1722 on: 19 Mar, 2009, 15:10:18 »
Hello all,

if anyone can help me translate this into ancient greek or modern greek (since this seems to be the only actual tattoo forum) it would be much appreciated.

As for context I am almost sure that this is not an actual quote from anyone(not 100% though). It is for a female. My fiance has went through alot of rough things in her life and she is starting over and asked me if i could find this quote in ancient greek for her to get her first tattoo. I've tried all over the net and started trying to piece it together myself using Wikipedia until i came across this site so any help would be wonderful, so far all i have is something like "ego epibiosei mia kolasi oti mporeite mono oneirevomai" (sorry cant type Greek on here and can't copy/paste cause i've been writing everything down on a notebook) and also i have no understanding of Greek wording at all so if someone provides me with a translation i would also appreciate a literal translation as well-and similar quotes that I'm not aware of are always welcome!

billberg23

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Re: I have survived a hell that you can only dream of
« Reply #1723 on: 19 Mar, 2009, 17:38:32 »
if anyone can help me translate this into ancient greek or modern greek (since this seems to be the only actual tattoo forum) it would be much appreciated.
"ego epibiosei mia kolasi oti mporeite mono oneirevomai"
With a little help, your modern Greek version will be fine:
έχω επιβιώσει μιά κόλαση που μπορείτε μόνο να την ονειρεύεστε
(Corrections, hellenophones?)

spiros

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #1724 on: 19 Mar, 2009, 18:18:30 »
More idiomatic:

Έζησα μια κόλαση που δεν θα φανταζόσασταν ούτε στον χειρότερο εφιάλτη σας