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Translation Assistance => Other language pairs => English->Ancient Greek Translation Forum => Topic started by: Brona on 19 Feb, 2005, 19:10:18

Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Brona on 19 Feb, 2005, 19:10:18
id love to have this translated for a tattoo i want.
thanks

Moderator's note: As this thread has grown out of all proportion, you are kindly requested to start a new topic, even if it is for a tattoo, on the English -> Ancient Greek Translation Forum (https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?board=14.0) (click on Start new topic and make sure you enter the phrase you want translated—and only that phrase— on the Subject field). This will make it easier to handle as well as follow topics.
Title: Απ: The day i learn to fly im never coming down
Post by: wings on 19 Feb, 2005, 19:14:06
Hi there.

Your phrase can be:

"Τη μέρα που θα μάθω να πετώ δεν θα ξαναπατήσω στη γη"

All the best for the weekend,

Vicky
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ladragona1246 on 08 Mar, 2005, 12:35:50
I am of Greek descent and am getting a tattoo for my birthday. I would like to have the phrase "release your inner dragon" tattooed above the dragon and "fire and ice" below the dragon. I find that lowercase letters are more attractive. This is what the translator program gave me and since I am a new student of Greek I am still somewhat confused as to word order. Since I will be travelling soon to Crete to visit my grandmother's family I really don't want to have the wording wrong on the tattoo and get laughed at. Here's what I have...

απελευθερώστε τον εσωτερικό δράκος (release the inner dragon) but would rather have "release your inner dragon"

and

πυρκαγιά και πάγος

Please correct these for me. Thank you very much. I should mention that I am a female if this helps.
Title: Απ: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
Post by: wings on 08 Mar, 2005, 12:55:51
Hi there.

The second one "fire and ice" is definitely "φωτιά και πάγος"

As for the first one I would go for "Ελευθέρωσε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου" or "Δείξε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου".

Ι hope this helps.

All the best,

Vicky
Title: Re: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
Post by: ladragona1246 on 08 Mar, 2005, 13:14:08
Which one of the 2 suggestions is more in keeping with what I am trying to say? I tried finding a translation for "Unleash your inner dragon" but kept getting "start the internal dragon". Also what is the difference between "δράκο" and "δράκος" which when I translate the first I get dra'ko and the second I get dragon. And every time I type fire in the translator I get pirkagia "πυρκαγιά". But OK I translated the word that you gave me and got fire too. But with the 2 phrases that you gave me, which of the 2 is more in keeping with what I am trying to say?
Title: Απ: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
Post by: wings on 08 Mar, 2005, 13:26:09
Well, I would go for the first one: "Ελευθέρωσε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου".

Ιn Modern Greek there are still grammar cases, so "δράκος" is the nominative (e.g. The dragon is here = Ο δράκος είναι εδώ) while "δράκο" is the accusative (e.g. Show me the dragon = Δείξε μου το δράκο).

Αs for your second phrase, we use "πυρκαγιά" when something is on fire (e.g. prevention of summer fires) while "φωτιά" is the essence of the word (e.g. elements of the nature = fire, air, water). Thus, you can't use "πυρκαγιά" together with "ice".

Is everything clear now? :-)

Vicky
Title: Re: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
Post by: ladragona1246 on 08 Mar, 2005, 13:37:30
Yes that clears everything right up! Thanks again so much! Guess I need to really hit the books!
Title: Re: Απ: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
Post by: ladragona1246 on 08 Mar, 2005, 17:00:51
Well, I would go for the first one: "Ελευθέρωσε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου".

Ιn Modern Greek there are still grammar cases, so "δράκος" is the nominative (e.g. The dragon is here = Ο δράκος είναι εδώ) while "δράκο" is the accusative (e.g. Show me the dragon = Δείξε μου το δράκο).

Αs for your second phrase, we use "πυρκαγιά" when something is on fire (e.g. prevention of summer fires) while "φωτιά" is the essence of the word (e.g. elements of the nature = fire, air, water). Thus, you can't use "πυρκαγιά" together with "ice".

Is everything clear now? :-)

Vicky

One question though... I am a little confused about tense..it seems to me that "Ελευθέρωσε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου" is in the past tense, or am I misunderstanding this? Sorry to be such a pain, but since this is something so personal to me I want to make sure it's right. Thanks again for all the help!
Title: Απ: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
Post by: wings on 08 Mar, 2005, 17:08:36
It just happens for this verb, that the second singular person imperative of simple future is the same word with the third singular person of the simple past tense.

First person for future is "ελευθερώσω" and first person for past simple is "ελευθέρωσα" [singular in both cases].

All the best,

Vicky
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: struts on 29 Apr, 2005, 10:03:33
I want to get the word 'hoplite' or the Greek equivelent of 'infantryman' tatooed on my body.  I am a really big fan of Greek military Histroy and I am a modern day Hoplite myself so I really want the translation to be correct. I would be much obliged if someone could lend me a hand.  Thanks.

phil
Title: Re: hoplite
Post by: banned8 on 29 Apr, 2005, 13:45:07
It would look like this (http://www.akrovates.com/pics/Hoplite.jpg), in this beautiful font. You can right-click on it and download it on your computer and then print it out. But before you have it tatooed on your body, get the OK of other members.
Title: Re: hoplite
Post by: herzog3000 on 29 Apr, 2005, 19:14:22
Modern day hoplite?? Curious...
Title: Απ: hoplite
Post by: wings on 04 May, 2005, 17:23:44
Both Modern and Ancient Greek. You see this language is really glorious. Most of its words are still the same, 3000 years after they had first appeared.
Title: music -> μουσική
Post by: Demo on 21 May, 2005, 03:49:52
Hallo, now that I found this site I really think the Internet is really a useful tool, what a wonderful surprise...I'll introduce my question: my name's Demis I'm an Italian guy with a greek name(ehy by the way does anybody have greek friends or relatives with the same name? Demis and not Denis?I'd like to know if there is someone else in this planet who shares my name...never met him)I regard music as one of the most important things in my life and I would really love to get a tattoo of the greek word for music...CAN YOU HELP ME PLEASE???

I started my research in dictionaries and found out mousiké but I would like to know if there is more than one form of it (I studied Latin at school and I know the words change with the casus - nominativus, gaenitivus, etc...), if there's a difference between modern and ancient greek versions, what's the right pronunciation of it, is there just a correct form of writning it or is there a normal one and a more aulic one with long or short accents? God, I really would like to get the chance to learn this beautiful language...I hope you will have the time to help me
 
Grazie Demis
Title: Απ: MUSIC
Post by: wings on 21 May, 2005, 04:01:15
Hi Demis.

The Greek word for "music" is : Μουσική  -  ΜΟΥΣΙΚΗ  -  μουσική

There is one word only and it is pronounced /mousi'ki/ ("ou" as in "soup")

As for your name, there is a world-famous Greek singer, DEMIS ROUSSOS.

Quite a few Greeks have the same name.

All the best for the weekend,

Vicky
Title: Re: MUSIC
Post by: Philip on 23 May, 2005, 14:59:36
hi Demis.

Yes, there are two forms of the word μουσική:  μουσική (which is nominative and accusative) and μουσικής which is genitive.  The difference between nominative and accusative can be seen in the form of the definite article, which is η μουσική  for the nominative and τη μουσική for the accusative.

ciao

Philip
Title: Re: MUSIC
Post by: Demo on 24 May, 2005, 16:18:36
wow thanks a lot for your quick help guys i really appreciated i will be surfing through these web pages a lot in the future ciao ciao
Title: Keep true to the dreams of thy youth
Post by: mysticora on 23 Jul, 2005, 22:05:47
This is a quote by someone I don't remember the name of. *blush* But I want it tattooed on my back in greek and in greek letters, so would anyone kind enough help me translate this? Love, Emelie
Title: Re: Keep true to the dreams of thy youth
Post by: banned8 on 24 Jul, 2005, 13:42:45
A quick google search and a cross-check tell me this is by Friedrich von Schiller, Germany's great poet, the one who wrote the Ode to Joy, used by Beethoven at the end of his Ninth Symphony.

My Greek version for this would be:

Μείνε πιστός στα όνειρα της νιότης σου.

ΜΕΙΝΕ ΠΙΣΤΟΣ ΣΤΑ ΟΝΕΙΡΑ ΤΗΣ ΝΙΟΤΗΣ ΣΟΥ.
Title: Re: Keep true to the dreams of thy youth
Post by: mysticora on 04 Aug, 2005, 18:31:36
That's right :) Thanks

Thank you so much for the translation!
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 16 Aug, 2005, 23:20:47
This site has received many a request for the translation of English words or phrases into Ancient Greek. These Ancient Greek words or phrases are often to be used in permanent or semi-permanent markings on people’s skin, otherwise known as tattoos.

Ancient Greek is a dead language. So is the Greek of Hellenistic times used in the New Testament. It is one thing to ask for what someone said in a specific play or epic or passage of the Bible, and a completely different thing to ask for any odd word or phrase to be reproduced in some form of Ancient Greek. Which form? The Greek of the Bible? Homer’s Greek? The Attic Greek? (i.e. the Greek of classical times, Plato's Greek; not the Greek you have conveniently stashed away in the attic).

And what’s the use of having something printed on your skin which no one will understand and may well be wrong because someone here got the wrong idea of what you wanted?

“The vengeance is mine” does not come from any Ancient Greek writings. It is a Jewish relic in the Christian religion. Paul says in his epistle to the Romans (12:19), “for it is written: Vengeance is mine; I will repay” (which harks back to the Deuteronomy 32:35, “To me belongeth vengeance, and recompense”, «εν ημέρα εκδικήσεως ανταποδώσω»).

Now the Greek in Romans for “Vengeance is mine; I will repay” is:
εμοί εκδίκησις - εγώ ανταποδώσω

I’m glad to say that the meaning of ανταποδώσω in modern Greek is more likely to have a positive meaning (“I’ll repay you for the good you have done me”).

P.S. This does not mean that I'm prepared to find or invent a translation for Nietzsche's “What does not destroy me, makes me stronger”.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 16 Aug, 2005, 23:43:23
I definitely agree with you, Nickel and I am glad you created a thread on this issue.

I have been trying hard to explain this same thing to the askers for months now. Classic or Bible Greek or Classic Latin cannot and should not be used to express just any idea that occurs to us. Modern phrases need to make sense in order to be translated into any Classic language and all aspects must be taken into account - history, culture, customs of each era.

E.g. you can't ask how to say 'Merry Christmas' in Ancient Greek since Christianity did not exist then - thus, any translation of this phrase would definitely be sheer nonsense in Ancient Greek.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: spiros on 17 Aug, 2005, 00:04:49
Indeed, it will be a good idea to post a link to this thread to any future askers.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 17 Aug, 2005, 00:09:24
Right you are - I have already done so in some recent questions.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 17 Aug, 2005, 02:16:33
Συγγνώμη, αλλά όταν πληροφορούμαστε ότι ένας Άγγλος καθηγητής έχει μεταφράσει στα αρχαία ελληνικά τον... Χάρυ Πότερ, δεν νομίζω ότι μπορεί να θεωρείται γλωσσικά αδύνατη η απόδοση στην αρχαία γλώσσα μιας πρότασης του τύπου "Ό,τι δεν με σκοτώνει με κάνει πιο δυνατό". Να υπενθυμίσω ότι το 90% της τρισχιλιετούς μας γραμματείας είναι γραμμένο στα αρχαία και ότι ακόμα και συγγραφείς που η μητρική τους γλώσσα δεν διέφερε πολύ από τη σύγχρονη δική μας (Μιχαήλ Ψελλός, Άννα Κομνηνή κτλ) μπορούσαν να εκφράζουν τις σκέψεις τους σε άπταιστα κλασσικά ελληνικά;
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Aug, 2005, 02:41:03
Και ο Αστερίξ έχει μεταφραστεί σε αρχαία και νομίζω το in.gr έβγαζε κάποτε τις κυριότερες ειδήσεις και στην αρχαία ελληνική.

Απλώς οι επισκέπτες πετάνε ένα "μου μεταφράζετε αυτό στα αρχαία ελληνικά" και πρέπει στη συνέχεια να μαντέψεις πού του ήρθε, πού το βρήκε -- είναι κάτι που διάβασε στο διαδίκτυο και ανήκει στον Ηρόδοτο ή στον Όμηρο; Ή μήπως είναι από τη Βίβλο; Ή μήπως είναι κάποιο από τα αποσπάσματα που έχει υποστεί παραφθορά στο διαδίκτυο και έχει γίνει αγνώριστο;

Και αφού κάνεις τον ντετέκτιβ, γιατί φυσικά πολλά, τα περισσότερα μάλλον, τα αγνοούμε, ποιος μας λέει, αν πρόκειται για Νίτσε, ας πούμε, τι είναι αυτό που θέλει ακριβώς ο ερωτών; Σε ποια γλώσσα να του τον μεταφράσεις τον Νίτσε; Γιατί οι μισοί ξένοι, όταν λένε αρχαία ελληνικά, εννοούν τα ελληνικά της Καινής Διαθήκης.

Και τι νόημα έχει να μεταφράσεις εντέλει ένα τσιτάτο του Τσόρτσιλ στα αρχαία ελληνικά (ένα απόσπασμα ολόκληρο του Τσόρτσιλ θυμάμαι ότι μετέφρασα όταν έδινα αρχαία για GCE και μου έχει μείνει ο εφιάλτης της όλης υπόθεσης), με μεγάλη πιθανότητα να μην το πεις εξίσου καλά με τον κύριο καθηγητή που μετέφρασε τον Χάρι Πότερ (άσε που είδα ένα απόσπασμα και, αν θυμάμαι καλά, κάγχασα) και να πάει ο άλλος και να κεντήσει τη δική σου παπάρα πάνω στο δέρμα του...

Να μεταφράσει λοιπόν κάποιος αρμοδιότερος ολόκληρο τον Σέξπιρ στη γλώσσα του Ομήρου αν του κάνει κέφι, αλλά θα προτιμούσα να αποθαρρύνω τον κάθε περαστικό να κάνει τατουάζ με το "I'll be back" του Σβαρτσενέγκερ στη γλώσσα του Σοφοκλή. Τι στο καλό; Χάθηκαν οι καρδούλες και οι γοργόνες;
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 17 Aug, 2005, 03:05:11
Δεν διαφωνώ σ' αυτά που γράφεις -γλαφυρότατα, ως συνήθως- Nickel, αλλά περιοριζόμενος στο αυστηρά γλωσσικό μέρος, νομίζω ότι γενικά είναι εφικτή η μετάφραση τέτοιων προτάσεων στα αρχαία ελληνικά. Το "ό,τι δεν με σκοτώνει με κάνει πιο δυνατό", αν το φτιάξεις σε τρίτο πρόσωπο, βρεις τις κατάλληλες λέξεις και βάλεις και καμιά μετοχή, μια χαρά αρχαιοελληνικό ρητό μπορεί να γίνει. ;)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Aug, 2005, 03:18:48
Το να πω κάτι του τύπου "ό μη απολλύει με ενδυναμοί με", με κίνδυνο (α) να γίνω ρεζίλι σε όσους ξέρουν καλά αρχαία, (β) να αρχίσει μια ατέρμονη συζήτηση του είδους "μα γιατί δεν έβαλες εκείνο;" και "μήπως θα είναι καλύτερη η δοτική;" --όλα τα γνωστά που συμβαίνουν όταν δεν έχουμε να κάνουμε με το τσιτάτο κάποιου πιο σοβαρού και ξακουστού-- αυτό ακριβώς είναι που προσπαθώ να αποφύγω.

Και άλλο είναι να κοτσάρει ο τυπάς ένα κομμάτι Ισοκράτη στην ωμοπλάτη του και άλλο να γυρνά με ένα τσιτάτο του Νίτσε σε (κουτσή) μετάφραση nickel. Αυτά τα κουτσά είναι που με χαλάνε...
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 17 Aug, 2005, 03:19:50
Αγαπητέ ή αγαπητή frem (μιας και στο προφίλ σου δεν μας έχεις 'χαρίσει' ούτε το φύλο σου),

Τα πάντα μπορούν να γίνουν μια χαρά αρχαία ρητά αλλά καλό θα ήταν πρώτα να διαβάσουμε και να μάθουμε όλοι μας τα προϋπάρχοντα αυθεντικά αρχαία ρητά και μετά να συνθέσουμε νέα δικά μας και μάλιστα κατά παραγγελίαν.

Μα για να καταλάβω τώρα πού ακριβώς το πάμε: οι μελετητές των αρχαίων κειμένων κι όσοι μπορούν και γράφουν και ενδεχομένως μιλούν τις αρχαίες γλώσσες του κόσμου, ακόμη και σήμερα (ξέρω κάποιους) είναι ίσα κι όμοια με όποιον δεν ξέρει ούτε καν ποιος έγραψε τι (συνήθως) στην ξένη γλώσσα κι ένα ωραίο πρωί που του γυάλισε μια φράση, λέξη ή στίχος, θέλει να την κάνει τατουάζ;

Λυπάμαι αλλά θα θεωρήσω τον παραλληλισμό μεταξύ όσων ασχολούμαστε με τούτο το κομμάτι του φόρουμ και της μακαρίτισσας της Άννας της Κομνηνής και του άλλου μακαρίτη του Μιχαήλ Ψελλού μάλλον ατυχή και αβάσιμο - μακάρι να τους φτάσουμε κάποτε έστω στο νυχάκι τους.

Όσο για την πρόχειρη πρόταση περί της μετάφρασης του "ό,τι δεν με σκοτώνει, με κάνει πιο δυνατό", την θεωρώ χαριτωμένη αλλά εκ πρώτης όψεως δεν βλέπω πού θα κολλούσε η μετοχή... ίσως εκ δευτέρας (όψεως πάντα) την βρω για να αποκτήσει καλύτερη όψη το μπράτσο κάποιου ερωτώντος. Αλλά αυτή την καλή πράξη της ημέρας μάλλον θα την αφήσω για αύριο και θα χαρώ πολύ αν τώρα που μας έδωσες το έναυσμα τη βρεις πρώτος/πρώτη εσύ ή κάποιος άλλος.


Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 17 Aug, 2005, 03:47:36
Στα άρρενα μέλη του φόρουμ ανήκω, wings. Μου φαίνεται, πάντως, ότι υπεκφεύγεις λιγάκι, αφού ο λόγος που "αρνήθηκες" να μεταφράσεις τη ρήση του Νίτσε δεν ήταν η σκοπούμενη ευτελής της χρήση ως τατουάζ από πλευράς του ερωτώντος, αλλά το ότι:

"Some phrases are just out of the scope of classic languages like Ancient Greek or Latin."

Νομίζω ότι αυτό γλωσσολογικά δεν ευσταθεί. Αλλά είναι μεγάλη η συζήτηση για να την κάνουμε τέτοια ώρα.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 17 Aug, 2005, 17:20:27
Aγαπητέ μου frem,

To τελευταίο πράγμα που συνηθίζω είναι οι υπεκφυγές (είτε λιγάκι είτε πολύ). Κι αν διαβάσεις προσεκτικά την ερώτηση που αναφέρεις, και αναρωτηθείς και τι σχέση έχει η ρήση του Νίτσε με το τατουάζ το αφιερωμένο στην θεά Άρτεμη, τότε ίσως θα καταλάβεις το "out of scope" που έγραψα στον ερωτώντα.

Υπάρχουν όμως κι άλλοι λόγοι που 'αρνήθηκα' να μεταφράσω τη φράση:

Πρώτος και καλύτερος είναι ότι νιώθω πολύ μικρή για να μεταφράσω σωστά στα αρχαία ελληνικά κάποιες φράσεις σαν αυτή και εκατομμύρια άλλες. Δηλαδή, εδώ συμφωνώ απόλυτα με τον Nickel. Υπάρχουν κάποιοι άνθρωποι που μπορούν να το κάνουν ανά πάσα στιγμή αλλά, φευ, δεν είναι μέλη του φόρουμ μας. Αλλά πάλι, αν ήταν μέλος ο Μαρωνίτης, πιστεύεις πως θα 'δεχόταν' να μεταφράσει κατά παραγγελία τη φράση του Νίτσε για τατουάζ αφιερωμένο στην Άρτεμη;

Δεύτερος λόγος είναι ότι όποτε αποπειρώμαι να μεταφράσω λέξεις ή μικρές φράσεις στα αρχαία ελληνικά, διαθέτω αρκετό χρόνο σε έρευνα και ανατρέχω σε λεξικά, γραμματική και συντακτικό για να βεβαιωθώ πως αυτό που προτείνω είναι αν μη τι άλλο αποδεκτό και υποφερτό. Και, λυπάμαι αλλά, για να το κάνω πρέπει να υπάρχει ισχυρό κίνητρο. Βλέπεις εγώ δεν είμαι στην κατηγορία των Βυζαντινών συγγραφέων που ανέφερες νωρίτερα και που μπορούσαν να εκφράζονται το ίδιο καλά τόσο στη γλώσσα της εποχής τους όσο και στη γλώσσα της κλασικής αρχαίας Ελλάδας. Αλλά φαντάζομαι πως ούτε κι εκείνοι ξεκίνησαν την καριέρα τους μεταφράζοντας για τατουάζ - βεβαίως, μπορεί να κάνω λάθος και να είμαι τραγικά ανιστόρητη.

Τρίτος λόγος, και εξίσου βασικός: ό,τι είναι 'γλωσσολογικά' ή 'γλωσσικά' αποδεκτό, δεν είναι απαραίτητα και 'πολιτισμικά' ή ιστορικά ή αν θέλεις ενίοτε και ηθικά αποδεκτό. Και κλασικό παράδειγμα ήταν αυτό που προανέφερα για τα Χριστούγεννα.

Επειδή όμως εστιάζεις συνεχώς στην συγκεκριμένη ερώτηση με τη ρήση του Νίτσε και στηρίζεις εκεί την επιχειρηματολογία σου, θα σε παρακαλέσω να δεις προσεκτικά όλες τις προγενέστερες ερωτήσεις που έχουν γίνει στο τμήμα των Αρχαίων Ελληνικών του φόρουμ, όπου σίγουρα θα σκεφτείς ότι όλες ευσταθούν 'γλωσσολογικά'. Και θα χαρώ πολύ να δω τις δικές σου προτάσεις μετάφρασης ακόμη και σε παλιές ερωτήσεις, ώστε να ξεφύγουμε από την 'φλύαρη' αντιπαράθεση εδώ και να δοκιμάσουμε την 'ευστάθεια' στην πράξη.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Aug, 2005, 17:30:50
Με άλλα λόγια, και παραφράζοντας αυτό που είπε ο Σοφοκλής και κατέθεσα σε παρεμφερή ενότητα, «Το μη μεταφράζειν κρείσσον ή το μεταφράζειν κακώς».
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 17 Aug, 2005, 17:33:33
Μικρέ Nickel, φέρε τον έλεγχό σου, να σου βάλω άριστα. :-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 17 Aug, 2005, 23:55:47
Είναι, νομίζω, αυτονόητο ότι ελάχιστοι θα ζητούσαν τη μετάφραση μιας σύγχρονης φράσης στα αρχαία ελληνικά για "σοβαρή" χρήση. Χάριν παιδιάς συνήθως μπαίνουμε όλοι σε αυτή τη διαδικασία και για να εξασκηθούμε λίγο, συνδυάζοντας το τερπνόν μετά του ωφελίμου. Εγώ π.χ. κάνω καμιά φορά, για πλάκα, μεταφράσεις νεοελληνικών παροιμιών (του τύπου "Δειν τον όνον βέλτιον ή ζητείν"). "Σοβαρό παίγνιο", αν θυμάμαι καλά, είχε χαρακτηρίσει και τη αρχαιοελληνική μετάφραση του Χάρυ Πότερ ο Γιατρομανωλάκης, ενώ το ίδιο ασφαλώς ισχύει και για τις μεταφράσεις του Αστερίξ.

Θα μου πείτε, τώρα, βάζω στο ίδιο τσουβάλι τον Πότερ και τον Αστερίξ με ολόκληρο Νίτσε; Θα παίξουμε και με το έργο μεγάλων φιλοσόφων; Απαντώνται όμως, η αλήθεια είναι, και στο έργο τέτοιων φιλοσόφων μερικά αποφθέγματα που προσφέρονται για "μαζικότερη" χρήση. Το "Ό,τι δεν με σκοτώνει με κάνει πιο δυνατό", είναι τόσο γνωστή και οικεία σε όλους ρήση, που δεν με ξενίζει καθόλου αν κάποιοι την έχουν για μόττο και θέλουν ίσως να την κάνουν και τατουάζ στο μπράτσο τους. Και τα πιο σημαντικά πράγματα μπορούν να χρησιμοποιηθούν για ασήμαντους σκοπούς. Οι μελωδίες του Μότσαρτ, του Μπετόβεν και του Τσαϊκόφσκι δεν είναι αρεστές μόνο στους θαμώνες του Μεγάρου Μουσικής, αλλά και στους χρήστες κινητών τηλεφώνων.

Επανέρχομαι στην αφετηρία της συζήτησης, που ήταν η "απόρριψη" μιας αίτησης για μετάφραση στα αρχαία ελληνικά, με το αιτιολογικό ότι η εν λόγω φράση δεν μπορούσε να αποδοθεί σε "κλασσική" γλώσσα. Εγώ, τουλάχιστον, αυτό κατάλαβα από την απάντηση της wings. Και για να μη μιλάμε στον άερα, θα προτείνω, όπως μου ζήτησε, μια δική μου -ανεκτή, ελπίζω- μετάφραση, με τη βεβαιότητα ότι κάποιος μη ερασιτέχνης θα τα κατάφερνε σαφώς καλύτερα από μένα: "Ει μη ολέθρια, κραταιοτέρους τους άνδρας δεινά ποιεί." Νομίζω ότι αυτή η φράση σημασιολογικά θα ήταν περίπου ισοδύναμη με το "ό,τι δεν με σκοτώνει με κάνει πιο δυνατό". Και θεωρώ ότι όταν δεν ακούγεται "φυσική" η αρχαιοελληνική μετάφραση μιας πρότασης, το πρόβλημα είναι στη μετάφραση και όχι σε κάποια υποτιθέμενη εγγενή αδυναμία της αρχαίας γλώσσας να προσφέρει στον μεταφραστή τα εκφραστικά μέσα που απαιτούνται.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: σα(ρε)μαλι on 18 Aug, 2005, 03:34:32
Quote
Και θεωρώ ότι όταν δεν ακούγεται "φυσική" η αρχαιοελληνική μετάφραση μιας πρότασης, το πρόβλημα είναι στη μετάφραση και όχι σε κάποια υποτιθέμενη εγγενή αδυναμία της αρχαίας γλώσσας να προσφέρει στον μεταφραστή τα εκφραστικά μέσα που απαιτούνται.

Θα διαφωνήσω μαζί σου σ' αυτό και μάλιστα σθεναρά. Το στυλ του Νίτσε (οι αφορισμοί) ήταν κάτι πολύ προσωπικό και απόλυτα δικό του δημιούργημα. Τέτοιο ύφος γραφής δεν υπήρχε στην Αρχαία Ελληνική Γραμματεία. Το Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mich stärker είναι αφορισμός και όχι ρητό. Όπως κατέληξε στη δική σου μετάφραση, ο δύσμοιρος καταπονημένος Νίτσε θα έφριττε όχι με το γλωσσικό κομμάτι της απόδοσης, αλλά με τη μούχλα που αποπνέει.

Δεν καταλαβαίνω που αποσκοπεί η προσπάθεια ανάστασης της Αρχαίας Ελληνικής. Στο κάτω-κάτω γιατί δεν γράφουμε κείμενα σε αυτή, αφού είναι ο μοναδικός τρόπος ανανέωσης της και επανένταξής της στο γλωσσικό γίγνεσθαι. Πού βρίσκεται η νομιμοποίηση μουμιοποιήσης μιας γλώσσας που ανήκει στο γίγνεσθαι (τα Αγγλικά ή   τα Γερμανικά π.χ) σε ένα είναι χωρίς γίγνεσθαι, όπως είναι τα Αρχαία Ελληνικά; 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 18 Aug, 2005, 04:50:52
Πρωτοσέλιδο στις αυριανές εφημερίδες:

Ο nickel σε απόλυτη ταύτιση απόψεων με τον σα(ρε)μάλι
25 φούρνοι γκρεμίστηκαν - Αναζητούνται 3 φουρναραίοι και μια φουρνάρισσα[/b]
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 18 Aug, 2005, 16:13:38
Σα(ρε)μάλι, κανείς δεν προσπαθεί να "αναστήσει" τα αρχαία ελληνικά. Όπως έγραψα στο προηγούμενο ποστ, μόνο χάριν παιδιάς ή εξάσκησης μεταφράζει/γράφει κάποιος σήμερα στην αρχαία γλώσσα. Από εκεί και πέρα, αντί να εξετάζεται υποκειμενικά σε κάθε περίπτωση τι μπορεί και τι δεν μπορεί να "μεταφραστεί", θα ήταν προτιμότερο να οριστεί ότι το σχετικό υπο-φόρουμ στο translatum αφορά μεταφράσεις από και όχι προς την αρχαία ελληνική. (Εκτός αν κάποιος αναζητεί την πρωτότυπη μορφή ενός μεταφρασμένου στη γλώσσα του αρχαιοελληνικού χωρίου.)

Εμένα, πάντως, μου αρέσει που κάποιοι ξένοι θέλουν να εκφράσουν κάτι "δικό τους" στα αρχαία ελληνικά - έστω κι αν πρόκειται για τατουάζ και σαχλαμαρίτσες.
Title: Have passion in all you do
Post by: victorial on 03 Sep, 2005, 23:25:36
Hi, i have been trying to translate the phrase or find a Greek word that means, Have passion in all you do? 
Can someone help me with this?  Using english alphabet?  Many thanks, Victoria


Moderator's note: Hi Victoria. Please always use your question as the subject line of your message and post it in the correct forum. Please read the site rules carefully. Thanks in advance.:-)
Title: Απ: Have passion in all you do
Post by: wings on 03 Sep, 2005, 23:50:02
Να έχεις πάθος για ό,τι κάνεις.

Να παθιάζεσαι με ό,τι κάνεις.

[Na exeis pathos gia oti kaneis.]
[Na pathiazesai me oti kaneis.]
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Jimmyshaka on 27 Nov, 2005, 07:10:22
I believe I have come to the right place, I actually looked up this site expressly for the purpose of translating a quote for a tattoo I am planning to get. The quote itself is " Son, either with this or on this." As many of you are aware it is attributed to a Spartan woman speaking to her son prior to battle. I have seen variations on this but believe this to be the most "laconic". For those unaware it means to come back from battle carrying your shield or being carried upon it, as all of a Spartans armor was for his personal protection, but the shield was for the protection of his comrades in the phalanx. Im sure the question asked is why would you get this tattooed? I will happly share, this is what my mother said to me prior to joining the Marines 16 years ago, just one of many lessons, bits of advice, and guidance from my personal hero. I remembered this all this time later..and felt it important enough to include at her eulogy.
I would like to have this translated to Greek I also need advice on the proper type of greek to translate it to. Attic?
Is it possible to split it into two seperate parts as I plan to have it on my forearms? (one side; Son, either with this, the other side: Or on this" or would doing that scew the meaning or flow?
My knowledge of greek language is non existsant, i have always had a healthy interest in Mythology and history so this tattoo would have meaning on several levels.
I have taken up alot of time but if anyone is interested in helping me please do! thank you.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 27 Nov, 2005, 13:06:06
Ηi there.

You can say:  " Ή ταν ή επί τας"

"Son" should be omitted as it is implied by the ancient quote and you cannot split the phrase.

This question has already been answered at: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=925.0
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Nov, 2005, 14:10:27
In a tatoo I believe it should be written in upper case, and in your case split as: "Η ΤΑΝ" "Η ΕΠΙ ΤΑΣ" (Either with this) (Or on this)

The battle cry was often used in the past, on flags (http://www.army.gr/n/g/publications%5Carticles%5CGreekFlag0/) and military emblems (http://www.army.gr/n/g/archive/signs/).

In the pictures below, you can see it on the flag of Mani (central Peloponnese, 1821, War of Greek Independence) and on the emblem of the Second Army Corps (http://www.army.gr/n/g/archive/signs/html/b_ss.html).
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 27 Nov, 2005, 14:12:14
Ι really don't see any reason why it should be split, though. Do you, nickel?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Nov, 2005, 14:28:42
I'd rather it were not split. My suggestion would be: Keep different tattoos on different forearms. Otherwise, Jimmy may have to add, next to the first bit, "Continued on the other forearm".
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 27 Nov, 2005, 14:40:42
Ηahaha... indeed! :-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Jimmyshaka on 27 Nov, 2005, 15:51:37
Thank you both for your expert help and advice, as the phrase is shorter than expected i will most likely keep it to my left(shield) forearm. Having it placed across my back was suggested but i already have other tattoos there. I also thought of keeping it in english , but feel it would be better written in its original form, even latin was considered as she was full blooded Italian. I do have to admit the omission of "Son" does have a effect for me due to the personal nature..a very un-spartan way of thinking at that, but true non the less.
I again thank you for your help and I am sure you will hear from me again as I enjoy reading about Greece. Some of my drawings would also benefit from the addition of translated words.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ChildOfWar on 29 Nov, 2005, 08:20:08
I want to get the word 'Daimon' in ancient Greek letters as a tattoo. can anyone help me out with finding the correct translation to the concept of the daemon, or daimon? Thanks.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Pink Panther on 29 Nov, 2005, 08:35:33
Good morning,

"Daemon" = "Δαίμονας" in modern Greek and "Δαίμων" in Ancient Greek.


Added by nickel:
ΔΑΙΜΩΝ in upper case.
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demon and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daemon_%28mythology%29
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jmills on 26 Dec, 2005, 02:51:32
Hey guys, your thread seems to be perfect for what I'm looking for, this comming friday I would like to get a tatoo on my side that says "live and learn" in ancient greek, attic i believe, and was wondering if you knew the translation for it.  I like the idea of having it in all capitols, but would like to see it normally as well. It would mean alot to me, as I've always wanted to get a tatoo and at this point in my life this saying deems most appropriate, and since I have greek roots, would love to get it in this writing.  Thanks guys!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 26 Dec, 2005, 03:41:06
I suggest you use the famous saying attributed to Solon, known as one of the Seven Wise Men of Greece: "I grow old learning something new every day".

In Plutarch, this is:
Γηράσκω δ’ αιεί πολλά διδασκόμενος.
i.e. Γηράσκω / δ' αιεί / πολλά / διδασκόμενος = I grow old / always / many things / being taught.

The better known form of this saying, still often used in modern Greek, is:
Γηράσκω αεί διδασκόμενος.

Go for the shorter version. In upper case:
ΓΗΡΑΣΚΩ ΑΕΙ ΔΙΔΑΣΚΟΜΕΝΟΣ.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Lonesharkx on 29 Dec, 2005, 22:36:02
There is a phrase on gravestones often used "what you are i was what i am you will be"what is the translation in capital letters please. I hope I phrased my post right I dont want to seem demanding. I hope this isnt to vague
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 30 Dec, 2005, 00:17:03
The Greek equivalent, equally appropriate, is:

Εκεί που είσαι ήμουνα, κι εδώ που είμαι θα ’ρθεις.

i.e. I've been where you are and you'll be where I am.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned13 on 30 Dec, 2005, 09:25:26
In capital letters:

ΕΚΕΙ ΠΟΥ ΕΙΣΑΙ ΗΜΟΥΝΑ, ΚΙ ΕΔΩ ΠΟΥ ΕΙΜΑΙ ΘΑ 'ΡΘΕΙΣ.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: maryanne on 06 Jan, 2006, 18:44:48
Could you please help me translate the phrase,  "Did she have passion?"  If it doesn't translate literally could you tell me what the closest thing you can translate it to is, and what type of greek you used to translate it.  Thank you very much
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 06 Jan, 2006, 18:55:55
In Modern Greek, this would be "Αυτή είχε πάθος;"

Ηowever, I am not sure I understand the exact meaning of "passion" in your English phrase.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: maryanne on 06 Jan, 2006, 19:50:06
I mean passion like, to have powerful emotion such as love, joy, anger.   
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 06 Jan, 2006, 20:49:26
Well, then, my previous suggestion applies. I hope it helps, as it is a word-by-word translation.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: maryanne on 06 Jan, 2006, 22:01:42
Thank you very much for your help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 08 Jan, 2006, 04:52:41
hey guys, just stumbled upon this site while looking for a translation for a tattoo im getting in a few days. Im wondering if someone (nickel seems to be quite experienced/informative) can give me a proper translation for the words "Love Forever" or "Forever Love". My grandparents are from greece and im going to swing it by them but i am at home right now. Also, i know names are hard but if you could translate the name "Kyla" please. Thanks
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 08 Jan, 2006, 11:48:18
Ηi there.

Forever love =  αιεί αγάπη or αεί αγάπη
Love forever = αγάπη εσαεί

Ι would use the last one.

As for the transliteration (not translation) of the name, most probably it is Kυλά.

Nickel is very busy this weekend so I can help, if you don't mind.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:03:52
i do not mind at all. Actually i just read a few of the first posts and he seemed very knowledgeable so i directed to him. But your help is appreciated. Just for the record, if i were to have exactly what you replied tattoed on my arm would it be absolutley correct. I am not saying it is not i just want to make sure because it is irreversible. Once again, thanks for the reply.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:07:18
Υes, all of them are absolutely correct.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:07:31
Also, i was talking to my mother (was born in athens) she told me love was s'agapo or something similar and i was just wondering if the response you gave me was s'agapo in greek lettering.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:16:59
No, because "s' agapo" is "I love". Here you give me the noun "love" so the Greek word for the noun is "agapi".
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:22:26
and agapi translated into greek is αγάπη.

Agapi - transliterated

αγάπη - translated

correct?
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:23:22
Yes, indeed.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:26:21
You learn something new everyday....or in my case night, its 2:21am here in BC, Canada. What time are you at?
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:28:11
Oh, it 12.27 p.m. (i.e. noon). And, indeed, we always learn something new every day.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:29:49
and my last question for the night.

the word forever transliterated is....?

i have a chart of greek lettering here and to refer to it i would need the greek word for it to match.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:32:40
We are talking about Ancient Greek here and the word transliterated is "esa'i" or "e'i" or "a'i".
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:39:09
haha, sorry if im bothering you, but im also lookin for a font which greek lettering looks the best. Which do you prefer?
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:49:05
https://www.translatum.gr/dics/greek-language-links.htm

You can find the Greek Fonts in the above link. Whatever you choose will look fine.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 08 Jan, 2006, 12:55:25
thank you for all you help, have a good day.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 08 Jan, 2006, 13:00:00
And, you, have a good night rest.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Jan, 2006, 19:08:08
I would be in favour of

Αιωνία αγάπη

(eternal love)

Kyla (http://www.thenamemachine.com/baby-names-girls/Kyla.html) (which seems to have a number of meanings but people choose it because one of them is "lovely") is pronounced Κάιλα, which also happens to be a surname in Greek.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 09 Jan, 2006, 02:29:25
Well, eternal love looks better than forever love in greek lettering so i am going to go with it. Ill also be using Κάιλα for Kyla because it looks better than the one before that. The appointment is tommorrow so i will take some pictures to show all you who helped. Thanks again.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 09 Jan, 2006, 04:55:04
from what you all here have said and my mothers input im a little confused as what to use for the name Kyla. Can someone give me the most proper form since it is going to be a tattoo. Thanx
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 09 Jan, 2006, 05:00:39
Kyla is not a Greek name, so there is no Greek equivalent. I understand it is pronounced to rhyme with 'compiler' or 'Tyler'. (Let me know if this particular Kyla pronounces it otherwise.) Therefore in Greek transliteration it would be spelled Κάιλα.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: powell__c on 09 Jan, 2006, 08:11:47
Pronounced as Ki-la - Kyla
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: skycamefalling on 17 Jan, 2006, 08:35:19
My grandfather died recentley and he was the strongest  tie in our family.  He cherished our greek heritage the most out of anyone and since I've decided to get a tattoo I want it to be something meaningful.  Since it will be on me for the rest of my life I don't want it to be something I will regret.  I plan to get it across my back right below the shoulder line in a very small arc.  I want to get a greek word or phrase that would not only look good, but mean a lot at the same time. 

I had in mind:

-Remember
-Forever
-Family

that's it, though it seems pretty shallow I am not very knowledable on any greek phrases that might be a little more appropriate, if anyone here has any help that would be great, I was his closest grandson and I would really like to have something to not only remind me of my greek heritage but of my papou.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Jan, 2006, 20:13:58
Μέμνησο is the right word for ‘Remember’. It is known from this story (from Herodotus) about Darius, king of Persia.

When Darius heard of the burning of Sardis, he burst into a paroxysm of rage. It was against the obscure strangers who had dared to burn one of his capitals that his wrath was chiefly directed. "The Athenians!" he exclaimed, "who are they?" Upon being informed he took his bow, shot an arrow high into the air, saying, "Grant me, Jove, to take vengeance upon the Athenians!" And he charged one of his attendants to remind him thrice every day at dinner "Sire, remember the Athenians." (Μέμνησο των Αθηναίων.)
http://ancienthistory.about.com/library/bl/bl_smithhistoryofgreece7.htm
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLG,GGLG:2005-52,GGLG:en&q=%22remember+the+athenians

It also appears in many lesser known sayings, such as:
The skeptics’ “Νήφε και μέμνησο απιστείν” (Be sober and remember to disbelieve.)

Or the one we here should subscribe to:
Εν καιροίς χαλεποίς μέμνησο της γλώσσης” (In times of hardship, remember / turn to language.)

I therefore you skip 'forever' and go for:

ΜΕΜΝΗΣΟ ΤΗΣ ΟΙΚΟΓΕΝΕΙΑΣ

Μέμνησο της οικογενείας.


(Remember the family.)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: skycamefalling on 17 Jan, 2006, 21:14:25
Thank you very much.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: skycamefalling on 18 Jan, 2006, 05:45:50
I'm sorry for the trouble but I think I stumbled upon something that I might rather have

"Eternal Life"
im not sure whether it would be either all capitalized or not, so both cases would be awesome. 



Thanks again for all the help!
Title: Never enough
Post by: T-mac77 on 27 Jan, 2006, 04:37:18
Can someone please tell me how to say "Never Enough" in greek, or ancient greek, as in It's "Never Enough", or There's"Never Enough"
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Jan, 2006, 15:17:14
My suggestion is based on Epicurus' "For the profligate, enough is never enough". In Greek, "Ουδέν ικανόν ω ολίγον το ικανόν". The negative connotation is removed if you say "Ουδέν ικανόν" (Nothing is enough).

Ουδέν ικανόν
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: stoll05 on 27 Jan, 2006, 20:28:42
I am also thinking about getting an acient greek tattoo.  My quote is "Act well your part, there all the honour lies" from Alexander Pope's "Essay on Men." it is a phrase that I try to live my life by and I want it to be tattooed on my ankle so it is always there but I want it to be in Ancient Greek becuase it is such a Beautiful Language.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: artsygirl on 30 Jan, 2006, 06:43:26
I am thinking about getting a small tattoo on my foot.  My favorite Greek sculpture is the Winged Nike of Samothrace.  I would like to get the word "strength" in Greek on my foot along with a portion of her wing or some other small part of her.  Does anyone have ideas or help with the translation for "strength" or a better word.  I have also thought of using her name "victory".
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 30 Jan, 2006, 10:32:04
Ηi there.

The word "strength" has already been translated in this forum. Please look at: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=1778.msg8108#msg8108

As for "victory" you can say νίκη exactly as in the name of the sculpture you mentioned..
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: artsygirl on 31 Jan, 2006, 05:04:11
thank you!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: daviddebaere on 09 Feb, 2006, 06:40:50
Is it possible to translate 'Humble' , 'saved' and 'eternal life'
Maybe if possible in several fonts, because i want to get a tattoo, and just lookin what would look the best.
Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 09 Feb, 2006, 14:20:53
Have a look at these font options:
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ndz83 on 12 Feb, 2006, 09:47:05
Hello.  I've searched this forum and couldn't find an answer, and since my idea is to use it as a tatoo I might as well ask here.

Could someone help me out by telling me how to write "Virtue is Knowledge" in Ancient Greek as Socrates might have written it (or more particularly how Plato wrote it)?  I'd really appreciate it.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 12 Feb, 2006, 14:25:17
Plato didn't write it exactly like that. It is summed up in these words in Xenophon, where he says "και την δικαιοσύνην και την άλλην πάσαν αρετήν σοφίαν είναι". So my short version is:

Πάσα αρετή σοφία
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ndz83 on 13 Feb, 2006, 04:22:26
Thank you very much. 

I'm sorry for asking more, but how exactly are those accents used when spoken?

Also, I'm going to use all capital letters.  Would the accents be right above the letters in the same way?

Thank you again!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Feb, 2006, 04:59:53
The accents just show where the stress falls. So this would be pronounced /pahsa aretee sofeea/. However, the accents are used only with lower-case characters.

Here it is, all in capital letters:

ΠΑΣΑ ΑΡΕΤΗ ΣΟΦΙΑ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ndz83 on 13 Feb, 2006, 07:55:53
You've been a lot of help, Nickel.

Last question, promise.  In another topic you showed a font that you said was your favorite for ancient Greek.  I've searched all over the web for something similar because I think it's great.  I think it would be perfect for what I was thinking.  What's the name of it?

-Nick S
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Feb, 2006, 15:18:00
It's a rather expensive font called Lithos, available from various sources such as Linotype or Adobe (I think I have the Adobe version with Greek).

If you need a specific phrase in that font, I'll prepare a JPG for you according to specs.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Paula on 13 Feb, 2006, 19:03:29
Hi!
I'm a Spanish girl and I really wanna get a tattoo around my left ankle. I have looked for places where peoplecan translate into Ancient Greek and I haven't found any. This web has really saved me:-)
The sentence I want to translate is "La verdadera libertad consiste en ser dueños de la propia vida" in Spanish, so in English it would be something like: "true freedom lies in/consist of being owner of your own life".
I think is something Plato said and probably there's any better translation. You will make me the happiest girl in the world if you could help me.
Thank you for your time.
:-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Feb, 2006, 21:34:48
To the happiest girl in the world:

Ελευθερία ηγεμονία βίου

(Definitiones, 412.d.1)

Just three words: Freedom - mastery - of life.

However, I believe that your quotation corresponds to what follows a couple of phrases later

ελευθερία ... εξουσία του καθ' εαυτόν εν βίω

Freedom is having control of one's own life

The first one, in upper case Lithos:
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Paula on 14 Feb, 2006, 12:18:49
Thank you very much for making me happy:-)
Now I have a problem, maybe because my level of English is not enough to understand properly your answer.
You said that "ελευθερία εξουσία του καθ' εαυτόν εν βίω" means literally Freedom is having control of one’s own life, didn’t you? And that’s what I should get written around my ankle, isn’t it?
Thank you again. Thank you, thank you, thank you!
You are all great people:-)
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 14 Feb, 2006, 12:24:13
Hi Paula.

Yes, this is exactly what nickel suggested yesterday and what you understood is absolutely correct.:-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Paula on 14 Feb, 2006, 14:04:24
Thank you wings, thank you Nickel.
I wish you have a nice day.
:-)
Title: Gifted with free will, I kneel to the mercy of fate
Post by: dasjestyr on 17 Feb, 2006, 04:37:33
can someone please translate this to greek? as accurate as possible as this will be a tattoo. can you please also tell me the literal translation.


please email me at dasjestyr@gmail.com thank you!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Feb, 2006, 17:42:48
My suggestion (in modern Greek) would be:

Προικισμένος με ελεύθερη βούληση, υποτάσσομαι στις προσταγές της μοίρας.

(Gifted with free will, I submit to the dictates of fate.)

I can't see why you don't want it in English. It's not taken out of the Bible or anything.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dasjestyr on 17 Feb, 2006, 19:20:11
well its for a tattoo, english would be kinda eh... its for cool factor i think. i have a series of tattoos across several cultures and languages =)
Title: Unity
Post by: drinking_wigga on 28 Feb, 2006, 02:26:22
hey just wondered how you'd say the word 'unity' in greek?
I went on yahoo translation website and it came out with this...

ενότητα

is that correct? And if not, what is the correct way? it's for a tattoo i'm planning on getting this week so it has to be 100% hehe

oh & just outta interest how is it said in Ancient Greek as well?

thank you!! :)
Title: Απ: Unity
Post by: wings on 28 Feb, 2006, 03:41:38
In Modern Greek you can say:

Ενότητα (unitedness) or
Ομόνοια (amity, union) or
Ομοψυχία (unanimity)

Ancient Greek would be:

Ενότης (unitedness) or
Ομόνοια (amity, union)
Title: Troy
Post by: rweier on 28 Feb, 2006, 08:23:25
Hi. My boyfriends name is Troy and he was wanting to get a tattoo of his name in Ancient Greek spelling/symbols. And also, would the translation of a persons name 'Troy' be the same as for 'Troy' the ancient city?
Thank you for your help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: drinking_wigga on 28 Feb, 2006, 11:37:04
aww thank you very much!! It's really appreciated!
Take care.
Title: Απ: Troy
Post by: wings on 28 Feb, 2006, 12:45:50
Well in Greek, Troy is only the name of the ancient city which was called Τροία.

You cannot use it as the translation of a name for 2 reasons:

1. Τροία is not a name for people either in Ancient or in Modern Greek.
2. Τροία is a feminine noun so it cannot be used to translated a man's name.

Your boyfriend can use Tροία to refer to the ancient city only.

For his name, he can transliterate it into Greek as Tρόι but I can see no point in this transliteration as it makes no other sense than that of a foreign name in Greek.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 28 Feb, 2006, 13:33:00
Re Troy:

I would like to concur with my esteemed colleague.

According to: http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Troy
The boy's name Troy is pronounced troy. It is of Irish and Gaelic origin, and its meaning is "descendant of the footsoldier." Surname given to those who migrated to England from the French city of Troyes after the Norman conquest of 1066. As a given name, Troy may derive from the ancient Greek city where the Trojan wars were fought. Actor Troy Donahue made the name popular in the 1960s and 1970s. Jane Fonda named one of her children Troy. Football player Troy Aikman.

According to the Dictionary of Proper Names: ...The present form of the name evolved from this [Troyes], with a spelling perhaps influenced by that of the famous Troy of ancient Greece.

The name of the king who is said to have given his name to the city was Τρως and the name of an inhabitant of Troy (Trojan) is Τρώας.



Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rweier on 01 Mar, 2006, 01:54:56
Thanks for your feedback, its very appreciated. You all do a great job!.
Kind Regards
Rebecca
Title: strength and honor
Post by: hdsurf on 03 Mar, 2006, 00:27:33
I'm looking for ancient greek translations for this in both upper and lower case if possible thanks!  if it makes a diffference it is to be put on the shield of a tattoo of Ares.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 03 Mar, 2006, 01:08:32
Somehow I prefer "Honor and strength" in Greek, τιμή και δύναμη (http://www.google.com/search?ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=%22%CE%A4%CE%99%CE%9C%CE%97+%CE%9A%CE%91%CE%99+%CE%94%CE%A5%CE%9D%CE%91%CE%9C%CE%97) in modern Greek.

Here it is in ancient Greek.
Title: Re: Απ: Unity
Post by: drinking_wigga on 09 Mar, 2006, 15:04:46
In Modern Greek you can say:

Ενότητα (unitedness) or
Ομόνοια (amity, union) or
Ομοψυχία (unanimity)

Ancient Greek would be:

Ενότης (unitedness) or
Ομόνοια (amity, union)


thanks for that, but sorry to bug you again just got one other question, how would you pronounce Ενότητα?
thanks!
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 09 Mar, 2006, 15:43:22
Hi there. You pronounce it as: /e'notita/.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: doryphor on 14 Mar, 2006, 23:08:20
Hi there!
Great forum
As per the other posters, I have a request for a few words in Ancient Greek (as spoken by the philosophers).

They consist of the four chief virtues:

Wisdom (or Prudence, if there's a difference, but preferably Wisdom)
Fortitude
Justice
Temperance

In Capitals, if possible as Ancient Greek would have written them I understand.

many thanks in advance, and again, great forum!

Tim
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: certifiedgrekko on 19 Mar, 2006, 22:19:44
Hey there how's it going? I wanted to get grandparents last name in greek on my shoulders. There name before they came to the US was Stavropoulos and it is now the shortened version Stavros. I was wondering if i can get both translations. I also want to follow the last name with a greek orthodox cross down my back, does anyone have any good pics of the cross that be easy for a tatoo artist to replicate. Thanks for all the help, Nathaniel
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: spiros on 19 Mar, 2006, 22:21:21
Σταυρόπουλος
Σταύρος
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: certifiedgrekko on 20 Mar, 2006, 00:03:00
Thanks for the reply, I need it in capitals with a good font , Ive come across the lowercase version but i want it to be big capitals across the shoulders.
Title: Live Love Laugh -> Ζήσε Αγάπα Γέλα
Post by: cutelilditz05 on 20 Mar, 2006, 07:37:53
Hey I want to get a tat of these three words and i dont want to screw it up (it will be there forever hah) Thanks.
Title: Απ: Live Love Laugh
Post by: wings on 20 Mar, 2006, 12:44:45
Ζήσε Αγάπα Γέλα

These are the imperatives as in "Live! Love! Laugh!".

If you want the translation for "I live, I love, I laugh", then it is:

Ζω Αγαπώ Γελώ
Title: I will never leave you
Post by: clone101 on 23 Mar, 2006, 02:16:45
I was wondering what the proper translation of "I will never leave you" would be coming from the New Testament Hebrews 13:5. I'm looking to get it as a tattoo. Could I see it in all caps as well as lowercase?
Thanks for your help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 23 Mar, 2006, 02:57:36
ου μη σε ανώ

It's part of: I will never leave you nor forsake you.

Mind you, the first half does not stand well on its own.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: clone101 on 23 Mar, 2006, 03:04:42
Thank you very much. If it's not too much trouble, could I see it in a few other fonts as well? (I noticed you did this a couple of pages back).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 23 Mar, 2006, 03:15:43
Here you are.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: clone101 on 23 Mar, 2006, 03:30:22
Much thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 23 Mar, 2006, 06:41:47
Ου μη σε ανώ ουδ' ου μη σε εγκαταλίπω.

Νίκο Σαραντάκο, πώς σου φαίνεται αυτό γραμμένο μονοτονικά;

;)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 23 Mar, 2006, 13:22:44
Ου μη σε ανώ ουδ' ου μη σε εγκαταλίπω.
Νίκο Σαραντάκο, πώς σου φαίνεται αυτό γραμμένο μονοτονικά;
;)

Επειδή, εκτός από Νίκος, είμαι και υπεύθυνος για την κατάθεση του μισού από δαύτο σε μονοτονική μορφή, να πάρω θέση:

Προτιμώ: Ου μή σε ανώ ουδ' ου μή σε εγκαταλίπω.

Ελπίζω να το τονίζω καλά. Αυτό που θέλω να πω: είμαι υπέρ ενός γνήσιου μονοτονικού συστήματος τονισμού, με τόνο σε κάθε φωνήεν που τονίζεται.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 23 Mar, 2006, 13:27:59
Aν και δεν είμαι Νίκος, ελπίζω να μου πέφτει λόγος και θα συμφωνήσω με την πρόταση του nickel.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 23 Mar, 2006, 18:32:48
Ου μη σε ανώ ουδ' ου μη σε εγκαταλίπω.
Νίκο Σαραντάκο, πώς σου φαίνεται αυτό γραμμένο μονοτονικά;
;)

Επειδή, εκτός από Νίκος, είμαι και υπεύθυνος για την κατάθεση του μισού από δαύτο σε μονοτονική μορφή, να πάρω θέση:

Προτιμώ: Ου μή σε ανώ ουδ' ου μή σε εγκαταλίπω.

Ελπίζω να το τονίζω καλά. Αυτό που θέλω να πω: είμαι υπέρ ενός γνήσιου μονοτονικού συστήματος τονισμού, με τόνο σε κάθε φωνήεν που τονίζεται.

Εντάξει, δεν πιστεύω τώρα να τίθεται ζήτημα εφαρμογής του μονοτονικού (ή κάποιου είδους μονοτονικού) και στα αρχαία ελληνικά. Η πολυτονική τους γραφή είναι διεθνώς καθιερωμένη και σεβαστή- όχι μόνο για λόγους παράδοσης, αλλά και ορθότητας και χρησιμότητας (εύκολα αποδείξιμης).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 23 Mar, 2006, 18:56:00
Εντάξει, δεν πιστεύω τώρα να τίθεται ζήτημα εφαρμογής του μονοτονικού (ή κάποιου είδους μονοτονικού) και στα αρχαία ελληνικά. Η πολυτονική τους γραφή είναι διεθνώς καθιερωμένη και σεβαστή- όχι μόνο για λόγους παράδοσης, αλλά και ορθότητας και χρησιμότητας (εύκολα αποδείξιμης).

Το Βήμα (http://digital.tovima.gr/) αυτές τις μέρες προσφέρει την Ιστορία του Παπαρρηγόπουλου ("μπαμπά, γιατί το έχουν γράψει έτσι το όνομά του που να διαβάζεις 'παπάρι';" με ρώτησε η κόρη μου). Σε μονοτονικό. Λοιπόν, βάζω στοίχημα (αν και δεν μπορώ να το αποδείξω) ότι περισσότερο τρίζουν τα κόκαλα του Παπαρρηγόπουλου γι' αυτή την ιεροσυλία απ' όσο θα 'τριζαν τα κόκαλα των τραγικών ποιητών ή των ευαγγελιστών.

Όχι, βέβαια, δεν θέτω ζήτημα εφαρμογής του μονοτονικού στα αρχαία. Αλλά, αν κάποια φωτισμένη υπουργός παιδείας ανακοίνωνε μια πρωία ότι στο εξής τα σχολικά βιβλία των αρχαίων θα είχαν το αρχαίο κείμενο με το μονοτονικό σύστημα, εγώ δεν θα αντιδρούσα καθόλου. Πιθανότατα, θα έλεγα και μπράβο.

Αν είναι όμως να συνεχίσουμε αυτή την κουβέντα, θα πρέπει να την πάμε σε άλλο νήμα: σε καινούργιο (αρχαία ελληνικά σε μονοτονικό;), στη συζήτηση για το μονοτονικό εκεί που την είχαμε αφήσει ή στο νήμα για τις διαδηλώσεις στη Γαλλία (;).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 24 Mar, 2006, 23:50:40
Hi there!
Great forum
As per the other posters, I have a request for a few words in Ancient Greek (as spoken by the philosophers).

They consist of the four chief virtues:

Wisdom (or Prudence, if there's a difference, but preferably Wisdom)
Fortitude
Justice
Temperance

In Capitals, if possible as Ancient Greek would have written them I understand.

many thanks in advance, and again, great forum!

Tim

Oops, sorry. We must have missed it. Here goes:

Wisdom = ΣΟΦΙΑ (or prudence = ΦΡΟΝΗΣΗ)
Fortitude = ΑΝΔΡΕΙΑ
Temperance = ΣΩΦΡΟΣΥΝΗ
Justice = ΔΙΚΑΙΟΣΥΝΗ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tsioutsiou on 25 Mar, 2006, 01:31:22


Temperance = ΣΩΦΡΟΣΥΝΗ


If I don't misapprehend temperance as moderation, self-control, I would have thought of it in ancient Gr. as ΕΓΚΡΑΤΕΙΑ .
Besides,  ΣΩΦΡΟΣΥΝΗ refers as well to prudence, interchangeably with ΦΡΟΝΗΣΗ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 25 Mar, 2006, 01:42:07
These are the four cardinal virtues, according to Plato. So I think I've used the words used by Plato.

P.S. OK, checked them with the encyclopedia and the Republic. They're the correct equivalents.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: σα(ρε)μαλι on 25 Mar, 2006, 01:59:00
Nickel is certainly right. Temperance is knowledge of someone's own measure, the knowledge of the "middle way" between too much and too little. Of course, later, religious authors, such as St Augustine took over these virtues and maybe the meaning of temperance was altered to designate restraint and abstinence. This is not to say that the meaning of the word σωφροσύνη was altered, but that the actual virtue was probably modified. 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tsioutsiou on 25 Mar, 2006, 04:13:59
Thanks – sorry, N., I didn't mean to bother you with checking it out in the “Republic” :) ;  In fact I didn’t see temperance, in philosophical context, as a quality of Plato’s fixed value pattern, but rather as a current word of self-control (EΓΚΡΑΤΕΙΑ) being in use in Attic prose writers, incl. Plato. Αnd in this, later religious writers by no means innovated nor did they add a fresh moral complexion to the word, however much currency it was to gain therefter. But you are right, sa(re)mali, as to ΣΩΦΡΟΣΥΝΗ which especially in eastern patristic literature led to the mystic understanding of ΝHΨΙΣ (temperance-sobriety), a fundamental notion, theologically re-defined, through Orthodox spiritual tradition .

http://colet.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/chuck/woodhouse_pages.pl?page_num=448
http://colet.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/chuck/woodhouse_pages.pl?page_num=860

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 25 Mar, 2006, 04:19:33
To let you in on a secret, I had also given ΕΓΚΡΑΤΕΙΑ, and then noticed Tim's (the asker's) "four chief virtues" and got wise to the fact that he was referring to Plato's virtues.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: σα(ρε)μαλι on 25 Mar, 2006, 12:15:10
Πάντως, tsioutsiou ή Περ. (very intriguing indeed) αγνοούσα την πηγή που παραθέτεις κι απ' ό,τι βλέπω είναι αξιόλογη, οπότε cheers mate.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 25 Mar, 2006, 14:33:54
Στα ενδιαφέροντα που έχει η βιβλιοθήκη του Πανεπιστημίου του Σικάγου, είναι τα λεξικά της Γαλλικής Ακαδημίας (http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/efts/ARTFL/projects/dicos/onelook.html), που τα έχω βρει πολύ χρήσιμα, και ένα ιστορικό βιβλίο, o Θησαυρός (Λεξικό συνωνύμων) του Jean Nicot, του κυρίου που ως πρεσβευτής του Γάλλου βασιλιά στην Πορτογαλία, έστελνε σπέρματα καπνού στο παλάτι και έκανε την Αικατερίνη των Μεδίκων "πρεζόνι" όταν κατάφερε με τον ταμπάκο να της θεραπεύσει τους πονοκεφάλους. Από το όνομά του και η νικοτίνη.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: doryphor on 25 Mar, 2006, 15:50:55
Thanks Nickel et al for your kind replies - One final question with regards to punctuation in Ancient Greek.

I know that Latin was written without punctuation or spaces between words, and the word endings defined where words and sentences began and ended. However, was Greek similar, or would there have been distinct spaces between the words?

(I realise that four words as the virtues are not a sentence at all, but wondered if it would make more sense to have gaps between the words in a tattoo, or an constant string of letters, or whether it even matters at all!)

Many thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 25 Mar, 2006, 16:04:31
Have a look at, say, the Rosetta Stone (http://www.bgst.edu.sg/realia/rosetta.htm) (dated about 200 B.C.). The Greek text at the bottom gives you an idea of what Greek looked like in those days. No distinct spaces. But, in your case, do use spaces. Your choice of words will not be read by the Greeks of those days.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: doryphor on 25 Mar, 2006, 17:15:10
Fair point lol!

And again, thanks for your detailed responses.

Title: bleed your passion
Post by: ineedone on 27 Mar, 2006, 06:52:59
its going to be a tattoo. to keep me motivated.
αιμάσσω σας παραφορά  is that right?


thanks for the help.
Title: Απ: bleed your passion
Post by: wings on 27 Mar, 2006, 10:11:14
"Bleed" is imperative here.

The same verb in imperative would be: "Αίμασσον το πάθος σου" but I am afraid this is not very good Greek. The phrase itself would be strange to use in Ancient Greek.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ineedone on 27 Mar, 2006, 10:37:28
well it doesnt neccessarily have to be in ancient greek. just greek. thank you mods for the move though.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 27 Mar, 2006, 11:23:20
Then you can say:  Κάνε το πάθος σου να ματώσει
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ineedone on 27 Mar, 2006, 20:48:27
thank you much, whats that translated into english?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Mar, 2006, 20:53:23
ineedone, what's the exact meaning you want to achieve here? Do things passionately?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ineedone on 28 Mar, 2006, 08:03:29
yeah thats pretty much it. like to put everything into it. by like bleed your passion, do it to the fullest, never give up, fight through the pain.
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 28 Mar, 2006, 12:46:16
Then you say:

Πάλεψε για το πάθος σου (Fight for your passion)
Πάλεψε για ό,τι σε παθιάζει (Fight for everything you feel passionate about)

Nickel, any more ideas?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 28 Mar, 2006, 12:48:03
Here are some more ideas:

Ζήσε το πάθος σου! (Live your passion.)

Άσε το πάθος να σε κυριεύσει! (Allow passion to overwhelm you.)

Ελευθέρωσε το πάθος σου! (Free your passion.)
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 28 Mar, 2006, 12:52:18
Thanks, Nick... just starting my first coffee.:-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ineedone on 29 Mar, 2006, 09:03:46
thanks for the suggestions... and for all the help

if you can say free your passion, or live your passion, why not "bleed your passion"

is there no word for it?

i know this probly sounds stupid but i typed the phrase into a translator and it spit out "aimasso sas parafora"

thanks again for all your generous help you guys are really great.
Title: Απ: Bleed your passion
Post by: wings on 29 Mar, 2006, 10:38:05
There is a verb in Greek but the fact is that no Greek would say "Bleed your passion" in the sense you mean to. That's why we gave you alternative phrasings.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Σοφοκλής on 29 Mar, 2006, 12:53:53
Just remember though that a tatoo (as I'm sure your mother has warned you) is for the rest of your life.
So if you're going to get one, get one that the eighty-year-old you will approve of.
Instead of one about letting passion overrule you, how 'bout one about asserting control over your passions?  (Letting the Guardians rule your Republic?)
I'm sure you could find some good ones in Plato or Diogenes Laërtius, or in a Greek translation of the Gymnosophists.
One that comes to mind from Socrates (in the Crito, 48b) is "Not Simply to Live...But to Live Well" (οὐ τὸ ζῆν...αλλὰ τὸ εὖ ζῆν).
Which means, among other things, living in accordance with the realization that things temporal are, as the Buddhists say, an illusion,
that the cave is nothing, that Croesus is naked, and that it is better to suffer wrong than to commit it.

(And of course there's the famous Delphic "know thyself" (Γνῶθι Σαυτόν), if you have the courage to face the answer.)
(The answer is just one letter, but it can be devastating!)
Title: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 29 Mar, 2006, 12:58:58
I absolutely agree with Sophocles.:-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ineedone on 30 Mar, 2006, 01:53:04
haha thanks for the advice on the tattoos... im fully aware of the permanance of one. it would be going around my wrist where a watch would sit. the meaning to me is for me to always stay focused on what i truly care about(soccer, my family,the very few special people in my life). i just came up with that little phrase and being that im greek as well it would have a little extra special meaning to it. i do like these suggestions though so if you are bored keep sending them. thanks alot guys.
Title: "Let it go"
Post by: Ashmael on 03 Apr, 2006, 17:54:54
Hey everyone,

I've gone through a very turbulent period of my life in the past year, relatively recently I've managed to start feeling like myself again and actually feeling good.  I managed to do this by constantly telling myself to "let it go".

To explain.... So many small things were bothering me and I would overreact to them because of the bigger things I hadn't got over.  The only way I was able to fight my way clear of the confusion and depression was to take a deep breath and tell myself that those little things weren't important, that I should just let it go and focus on the bigger issues.  Doing this constantly hasn't been easy, but I feel much calmer, clearer, stronger and happier as a result.

I was planning to get another tattoo anyway, but I want a constant reminder to keep to this self-control, I don't want to backslide and go all crazy-emotional-female again.

So if you could translate "Let it go", or perhaps advise me on a phrase that puts across a similar meaning I would greatly appreciate it.  Also, you linked a particular font (Nickel, I believe) and then produced the final phrase as an image in that font for another user.... If you could do the same for me it'd help - I plan on designing the tattoo myself in Photoshop. (I do graphic design and such).

All the best,

~Li~
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: chefsamurai on 08 Apr, 2006, 11:38:20
hello.  i read the post about maybe not using ancient greek for tattoos because some things do not translate well.  i came here to get a translation for a tattoo.  a devotee of pre- 1200's history,  i have my whole leg done in various ancient images, and wanted to do something to honor my grandfather who was full blood greek and has passed away.  not having people be able to read it is part of my reason, and as i said, i prefer the ancient.   please let me know if it is possible to translate " things are not as they seem" into ancient greek.  after reading the post i realize it may not translate, but i hope you may be able to give me some sort of idea what a translation would be.  thank you so much for your help as this will undoubtedly be the most meaningful of my tattoos.
                                                                                                                                      respectfully,
                                                                                                                                      chefsamurai
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Apr, 2006, 13:51:32
Τα φαινόμενα απατούν.

(Appearances are deceptive.)

The ancient Greeks did not put it exactly like that, but that's how it has now become known in most languages and is current in modern Greek.

And Li (Ashmael), you have not been forgotten. We're still thinking about how yours can best be put.
Title: Everything is more beautiful because we are doomed
Post by: savwiley on 09 Apr, 2006, 08:46:10
I love your site and your helpfulness ( as seen in other postings)...this will be a tattoo so accurateness is much appreciated. Ide like an Ancient Greek translation if possible...and you always have beautiful ideas, if not possible, so toss some at me. Thank You much!

Savannah

PS: If yall know of any appropriate quotes or sayings that describe a mothers love for her son (or child) could you tell me them in english and then translate to Ancient Greek?!?!!
Title: thank you
Post by: chefsamurai on 09 Apr, 2006, 09:26:33
thanks very much for the translation.  i really appreciate it.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Ashmael on 10 Apr, 2006, 21:28:58
Thanks very much... I know my "requirements" weren't too specific, I appreciate you taking the time.

~Li~
Title: Re: Μark 13:20
Post by: Joker23 on 12 Apr, 2006, 00:45:36
I was asking around on another website about a translation of a Bible verse into Latin or Greek for part of a tattoo.  I posted what I thought was the correct translation of the verse into Greek, and someone responded that I had translated it into "modern Greek" and suggested that since it was a Bible verse I should try ancient Greek.

A quick Google search brought up this thread on this board.  I was not aware that so many people wanted translations of ancient Greek for tattoos...

I was actually only interested in five words from Mark 13:20.  The entire verse in English is "And unless the Lord had shortened the days, no flesh should be saved: but, for the sake of the elect which he hath chosen, he hath shortened the days."

I was wanting a translation for "No flesh should be saved".  The translation I came up with was "Καμία σάρκα δεν πρέπει να σωθεί", which I was told was "modern Greek". 

Should I post a new thread for this request, or will this post be OK.

Also, is it possible to also have "Mark 13:20" translated?  If the English would be written out as "No flesh should be saved - Mark 13:20" could that be translated into anceint Greek as well, or is this way of attributing the verse to a particular Gospel and chapter a "modern" concept?

Thank you for your time.
Title: Re: Mark 13:20
Post by: wings on 12 Apr, 2006, 01:06:24
Ουκ αν εσώθη πάσα σαρξ is the Ancient Greek phrase you are looking for.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 12 Apr, 2006, 01:07:37
The whose verse is:

και ει μη κύριος εκολόβωσεν τας ημέρας, ουκ αν εσώθη πάσα σάρξ. αλλά δια τους εκλεκτούς ους εξελέξατο εκολόβωσεν τας ημέρας

No flesh should be saved:

ουκ αν εσώθη πάσα σάρξ (Μάρκ. 13:20)

With all of its accents:

οὐκ ἂν ἐσώθη πᾶσα σάρξ

Title: Re: Μark 13:20
Post by: frem on 12 Apr, 2006, 06:38:58
I was wanting a translation for "No flesh should be saved".  The translation I came up with was "Καμία σάρκα δεν πρέπει να σωθεί", which I was told was "modern Greek".

This translation is wrong, because the person who made it wasn't aware of the context. "Δεν πρέπει" means "should not"="must not" in modern Greek, which is not what "ουκ αν εσώθη" (=wouldn't be saved) means in ancient Greek. Actually, I don't think "ουκ αν εσώθη πάσα σαρξ" makes much sense standing alone.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Joker23 on 12 Apr, 2006, 16:54:49
Thank you for all of the replies!

I appreciate the time you take to help people with this, and it looks like the others you help appreciate your time as well.

Thank you again!
Title: NICKEL...WINGS!!!
Post by: savwiley on 13 Apr, 2006, 07:22:32
Hey guys I wrote a few days back about a phrase that I wanted translated....i know you are very busy people so im sure you just accidentally overlooked it but if you could PLEASE translate if AT ALL possible. PLease let me know....

The qoute is " Everything Is More Beautiful Because We Are Doomed."

Ide like to know if you could translate it into Ancient Greek (NOT all capital letters). THANK YOU SO MUCH!!


Savannah
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Apr, 2006, 16:25:44
Savwiley, apologies. I understand that this is something Achilles (Brad Pitt) says in the epic film Troy, not something out of Homer. The complete quote is: The Gods envy us. They envy us because we're mortal, because any moment may be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we're doomed. You will never be more lovely than you are now. We will never be here again.

Exact translation into modern Greek (not mock ancient):
Όλα είναι πιο ωραία επειδή είμαστε καταδικασμένοι να πεθάνουμε.

Rewrites (single sentences that sound better in Greek, based on the complete quote):
Όλα είναι πιο ωραία επειδή είμαστε θνητοί. (...because we are mortal)
Όλα είναι πιο ωραία γιατί κάθε στιγμή μπορεί να είναι η τελευταία μας. (...because any moment may be our last one)

In Eros (Less. 7 of Elizabeth Costello), J M Coetzee writes:
In marking us down for death, the gods gave us an edge over them. Of the two, gods and mortals, it is we who live the more urgently, feel the more intensely. That is why they cannot put us out of their minds, cannot get by without us, ceaselessly watch us and prey on us.


Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 13 Apr, 2006, 18:47:08
The concept would have been, for various reasons, alien to the ancient Greeks.  But in modern times, perhaps no Greek has expressed it more beautifully than Nikos Kazantzakis, in his "Odyssey" (Book 18, verse 912):   αλάτι ο θάνατος, και τη ζωή πολύ τη νοστιμίζει!  (lit., "Death is salt, and greatly flavors life!", or, as Kimon Friar translates it, "Death is the salt that gives to life its tasty sting!").
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 13 Apr, 2006, 19:48:23
Here is a -not totally unacceptable, I hope- translation in ancient Greek:

Καλλίονα πάντα ἡμῖν, βροτοῖς οὖσι.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Apr, 2006, 20:23:01
Τα αντίστροφα αρχαία μου είναι άθλια (η τελευταία μου σοβαρή σχέση μ' αυτά ήταν ένα GCE πριν από 40 χρόνια), κοίτα όμως εκείνο το "καλλίοντα" μήπως θα έπρεπε να είναι "καλλίονα" ή ακόμα καλύτερα "κάλλιον".
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 13 Apr, 2006, 20:59:57
Φυσικά για το "τ" έχεις δίκιο (μάλλον την κλίση των μετοχών είχα στο μυαλό μου όταν το έγραφα), αλλά τον ενικό "κάλλιον" γιατί τον θεωρείς προτιμότερο; Πες μου, άμα είναι, για να το κάνω edit μια και καλή.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Apr, 2006, 21:37:31
τον ενικό "κάλλιον" γιατί τον θεωρείς προτιμότερο;

Όχι σ' αυτή τη σύνταξη, αλλά σε κάτι εντελώς λακωνικό, π.χ. βροτόν κάλλιον. Αλλά βλέπω ότι αλλάζει εντελώς το νόημα.

Από 'κεί και πέρα, μου είναι εντελώς αδύνατο να απομιμηθώ το ύφος και τη σύνταξη των αρχαίων έτσι που να δώσω κάτι για το οποίο θα είμαι απόλυτα βέβαιος. Κοντά σαράντα χρόνια απομάκρυνσης από τα κείμενα...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 13 Apr, 2006, 21:42:55
Για να μην παιδεύεστε να προτείνω το «κρείττον εστί» που είναι συνηθισμένο;
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Apr, 2006, 22:11:06
Για να μην παιδεύεστε να προτείνω το «κρείτον εστί» που είναι συνηθισμένο;

Μα τι έχετε πάθει; Ο ένας προσθέτει "τ", η άλλη αφαιρεί...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 13 Apr, 2006, 22:26:32
Παιδιά, κουτσά-στραβά, νομίζω ότι το νόημα της φράσης το απέδωσα. Βάζω και ένα κόμμα για να γίνει σαφέστερο:

Καλλίονα πάντα ἡμῖν, βροτοῖς οὖσι.

Από εκεί και πέρα, απαιτείται σίγουρα πολύ καλύτερη γνώση της αρχαίας ελληνικής για να κάνει κάποιος αυτή τη δουλειά και νομίζω ότι θα πρέπει να ξεκαθαρίσουμε ότι αυτού του είδους οι "μεταφράσεις" γίνονται εδώ ερασιτεχνικά και χάριν παιδιάς περισσότερο. Όχι τίποτα άλλο, για να μην μας πάρουν και με τις ντομάτες καμία ώρα. ;)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 13 Apr, 2006, 23:56:08
Θείο, βιαζόμουν να δω την ταινία και μου ξέφυγε. Ήμαρτον...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: cbr6fs on 16 Apr, 2006, 00:36:50
I have read through all this thread, as i am also thinking of having a Tattoo in ancient Greek.

The thing is though, all i can think of right now is how helpful you guys and gals have been.

It's not often in this day and age you see people taking time out of their days to help others for no reward.

Well done, and keep up the good work.
Title: Strength and honour
Post by: hiddentrates on 16 Apr, 2006, 14:37:04
looking for something to go with a tattoo of a phoenix, something like "strength and honour" or if you have any greek phrases for being strong and getting back up again when knocked down, if you know what I mean, thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: hiddentrates on 16 Apr, 2006, 14:48:57
modern greek would be fine
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Apr, 2006, 04:23:40
Instead of the well-worn "strength and honour", one suggestion would be "ως φοίνιξ εκ της τέφρας του" (like a phoenix from its ashes). We have the same idiom, and this has the proper "ancient Greek" ring to it, though it is the title of a recent book.

The problem is that the phoenix has the wrong associations for a generation of Greeks as it was the emblem of the seven-year dictatorship (1967-74) (we would actually call it "the bird"). On the other hand, it is a worthy symbol with a long history and I hope our bitter memories of those years have not tarnished it for ever.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: hiddentrates on 17 Apr, 2006, 21:05:01
brilliant! thanks very much, really appreciated!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: cbr6fs on 18 Apr, 2006, 02:10:54
Hi Guys,

Well i was going to have the "Μολών Λαβέ" tattoo,
But after reading around it seems as though this is fairly common, plus i found a few nationalist type groups that were using it.
So now i am not really sure what to get.

It's obvious you guys are extremely well read, so is there any lines or phrases in ancient Greek that you guys really like that would be appropriate for a tattoo?

There are many phrases in modern Greek i like, but i wanted ancient Greek purely for the fact that there are not that many that can read it, so it gives some mystique.


Thanks
Keep up the fantastic work :)

Title: Re: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: NadiaF on 18 Apr, 2006, 11:30:34
Υes, all of them are absolutely correct.

Και σε συνδυασμό με τα υπόλοιπα... "τα νεύρα μου, τα χάπια μου κι ένα ταξί να φύγω"... πως θα το μεταφράζατε αυτό στ' αρχαία ελληνικά, τα λατινικά και τα εβραϊκά της ΠΔ?... το θέλω για ένα τατουάζ στο μέτωπο, για να με αποφεύγουν οι ελαφρόμυαλοι και οι βαρεμένοι... :-)))))
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: savwiley on 18 Apr, 2006, 17:47:18
Wow Nickel... you amaze me..... I didnt think anyone would know where i pulled that line from.  But yes that is where I got it from and I think he (Brad Pitt) put it allvery beautifully, huh?! Well thank you for the translation... I think im going to use the exact translation. Thank You a million!!!


Savannah
Title: Re: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 18 Apr, 2006, 18:02:05
Και σε συνδυασμό με τα υπόλοιπα... "τα νεύρα μου, τα χάπια μου κι ένα ταξί να φύγω"... πως θα το μεταφράζατε αυτό στ' αρχαία ελληνικά, τα λατινικά και τα εβραϊκά της ΠΔ?... το θέλω για ένα τατουάζ στο μέτωπο, για να με αποφεύγουν οι ελαφρόμυαλοι και οι βαρεμένοι... :-)))))

Την οργήν μου, τα ιάματά μου και άρμα αγοραίον ίνα απέλθω.

(Αυτά μέχρι να έρθει ο frem.)
Title: Re: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 18 Apr, 2006, 18:48:09
Και σε συνδυασμό με τα υπόλοιπα... "τα νεύρα μου, τα χάπια μου κι ένα ταξί να φύγω"... πως θα το μεταφράζατε αυτό στ' αρχαία ελληνικά, τα λατινικά και τα εβραϊκά της ΠΔ?... το θέλω για ένα τατουάζ στο μέτωπο, για να με αποφεύγουν οι ελαφρόμυαλοι και οι βαρεμένοι... :-)))))

Την οργήν μου, τα ιάματά μου και άρμα αγοραίον ίνα απέλθω.

(Αυτά μέχρι να έρθει ο frem.)

Αυτά μου ακούγονται ελληνικά εποχής μεταβυζαντινής.:-))))
Title: Re: Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: NadiaF on 18 Apr, 2006, 19:29:13
Την οργήν μου, τα ιάματά μου και άρμα αγοραίον ίνα απέλθω.

χαχαχαχαχαχαχαχα... το αγοραίον άρμα... με αποτελείωσε...

(Αυτά μέχρι να έρθει ο frem.)

Ωχ, όχι αυτό... δεν θα αντέξω κι άλλο frem... :-)))))
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: frem on 19 Apr, 2006, 10:28:14
Κοροϊδεύουμε, κοροϊδεύουμε;  :-)

Η γλωσσολογία σήμερα, πάντως, λέει πως οτιδήποτε μπορεί να εκφραστεί σε μία γλώσσα μπορεί να εκφραστεί και σε οποιαδήποτε άλλη. Οπότε τα παράπονά σας στον Τσόμσκι.  ;)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: NadiaF on 19 Apr, 2006, 10:36:02
Η γλωσσολογία σήμερα, πάντως, λέει πως οτιδήποτε μπορεί να εκφραστεί σε μία γλώσσα μπορεί να εκφραστεί και σε οποιαδήποτε άλλη. Οπότε τα παράπονά σας στον Τσόμσκι.  ;)

Κάτι, δηλαδή, σαν τα lame attempts τα δικά μου... όπως "θα μειδιάσει το ποικιλόχρουν ερίφιο";;;;

Και δεν θέλω γέλια... αρχαία κλασσική παιδεία... απηλλαγμένη εγώ και τα 3 χρόνια στο ελληνικό σχολείο... πάλι καλά που ψιλοκαταλαβαίνω τι λέτε εδώ μέσα... και ευτυχώς που οι ερωτήσεις είναι συνήθως στ' αγγλικά :-))))
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: cbr6fs on 22 Apr, 2006, 02:39:56
Hi Guys,

Well i was going to have the "Μολών Λαβέ" tattoo,
But after reading around it seems as though this is fairly common, plus i found a few nationalist type groups that were using it.
So now i am not really sure what to get.

It's obvious you guys are extremely well read, so is there any lines or phrases in ancient Greek that you guys really like that would be appropriate for a tattoo?

There are many phrases in modern Greek i like, but i wanted ancient Greek purely for the fact that there are not that many that can read it, so it gives some mystique.


Thanks
Keep up the fantastic work :)



Hi Guys

Does no one have a favorite phrase?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 22 Apr, 2006, 03:37:34
I've started building a short selection and I'll come back with twenty or more. But it'll have to wait until after the Easter holiday. Hope you can hold your breath.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: cbr6fs on 23 Apr, 2006, 02:48:22
No problem.

Happy easter to everyone.



Cheers (turning slightly blue)
Mark
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ~Eva~ on 25 Apr, 2006, 11:55:43
Hello,

I would appreciate your assistance in finding a suitable ancient greek symbol for a tattoo engraving at the back of my neck. I had initially thought of Herme's  caduceus, but since it is a symbol widely used in association to medicine I thought of avoiding it.

Thank you in advance.
 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 25 Apr, 2006, 12:33:44
a suitable ancient greek symbol for a tattoo engraving

Consider the following:

the rod of Asclepius (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_of_Asclepius) (somewhat different from the caduceus)

acanthus (http://www.acanth.com/gallery/acanthus02.php)

thyrsus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyrsus) (Various pictures on google (http://images.google.com/images?svnum=100&hl=en&lr=&c2coff=1&rls=GGLG%2CGGLG%3A2006-10%2CGGLG%3Aen&q=thyrsus&btnG=Search))

horn of plenty (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornucopia) (cornucopia) [Google images (http://images.google.com/images?svnum=100&hl=en&lr=&c2coff=1&rls=GGLG%2CGGLG%3A2006-10%2CGGLG%3Aen&q=%22horn+of+plenty%22)]

triskelion (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triskelion)

Symbols.com (http://www.symbols.com/) is an excellent searchable online source for symbols.








Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Manny on 29 Apr, 2006, 00:59:21
Hello,

My Daughter's name is Athena and I am wondering if someone could please show me her name written in ancient greek in a font I could use on a tattoo.  Thank you very much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 29 Apr, 2006, 01:07:54
Lovely name -- one of my favourite names, as a matter of fact.

Mind you, though the upper case version is closer to ancient Greek, you may have to go for the accented version, as the unaccented one may also be read as aTHEEna, which is "Athens" in Greek. The second one is athiNA, which is how the name of the goddess is read.

You can always keep the upper case version and have people guessing.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Manny on 29 Apr, 2006, 05:30:34
Thank you very much!  I really appreciate your help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: bug123 on 01 May, 2006, 07:01:32
I found a quotation that means alot to me and was wondering if anyone would be able to translate it into ancient greek or greek, its actualy written by pericles
"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others.”
thanks alot if someone can do this for me please email me at jessica_terezakis@hotmail.com
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Turk57 on 02 May, 2006, 15:21:55
Hi, I have searched EVERYWHERE trying to find this translation.  I would love it if you guys could help me out with your expert opinion.
I am trying to find "Conquer or die" in ancient greek letting, preferably a cool font, I'm going to get a tattoo of this across my back inbetween my shoulder blades. If there is any way you could do it in what you think is the best font for a tattoo, I'd would be forever in your debt. Thanks!
-Turk
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 02 May, 2006, 17:03:03
I found a quotation that means alot to me and was wondering if anyone would be able to translate it into ancient greek or greek, its actualy written by pericles
"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others.”
thanks alot if someone can do this for me please email me at jessica_terezakis@hotmail.com

Pericles himself did not leave behind any writings that we know of. Words have been put into Pericles' mouth by two ancient writers: Thucydides and Plutarch. The historian Thucydides was 40 years younger and had no firsthand knowledge of Pericles' early career. Plutarch wrote his Life of Pericles 500 years later. These sources are not all ascertainable, but they certainly preserve an invaluable amount of fact and contemporary gossip, which is sometimes nearly as useful.

The quotation that seems popular on the web as well as other quotations attributed to Pericles come from sources I am not familiar with. They are often paraphrases of the original text, but we cannot produce fictional Greek for imaginary quotations. So here is what we have of Pericles and, if you are able to trace something similar to the alleged quotation, I'll be glad to provide the original.

Pericles' Funeral Oration (http://www.fordham.edu/Halsall/ancient/pericles-funeralspeech.html) and Plutarch's Life of Pericles (http://classics.mit.edu/Plutarch/pericles.html).

For the time being, here is one of Pericles' best know sayings:

Ανδρών επιφανών πάσα γη τάφος.
[andron epiphanon pasa ge taphos]
"All the world is a burial place for illustrious men" or, as in the text in the previous link, "heroes have the whole earth for their tomb"




Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 02 May, 2006, 21:27:15
I am trying to find "Conquer or die" in ancient greek lettering, preferably a cool font.

I suppose you are referring to the famous "Ή τάν ή επί τάς" saying of the Spartans (see here (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Transwiki:Laconic)).

Here you are, in upper case and lower-case accented.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Turk57 on 04 May, 2006, 19:54:46
Thanks so much man, but I have one more request!! :D How would you translate
"Core of Perfection" ?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: OSUTeam on 04 May, 2006, 23:21:27
I was wondering what "Saint" is in Ancient Greek. I've tried to look up a translation but I'm not sure if it's right. Does anyone know. I'm trying to get a tattoo of it. I might be asking for too much but could I see it as a gif format b/c I need to show the tattoo artist what I want. Your help would be much appreciated!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 04 May, 2006, 23:36:11
I was wondering what "Saint" is in Ancient Greek.
Title: i need help!!!
Post by: armyof1_ui on 10 May, 2006, 19:02:58
hey i've been looking everywhere for any kind of phrase that the ancient greeks said before they went into battle, as well as the word brotherhood. im in the army and would like to get a tattoo of those two items.  thanks 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 10 May, 2006, 20:09:03
There have been a number of "battle cries" so to speak in previous postings. A phrase that, I think, has not been mentioned before is one from Homer (The Iliad) that is still quite popular:

ΑΜΥΝΕΣΘΑΙ ΠΕΡΙ ΠΑΤΡΗΣ

To fight for one's country.

The complete saying is: "ΕΙΣ ΟΙΩΝΟΣ ΑΡΙΣΤΟΣ, ΑΜΥΝΕΣΘΑΙ ΠΕΡΙ ΠΑΤΡΗΣ"

Some background here (http://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=4333),
One would expect Hector to have reservations about a war whose cause he considers ill-founded and which he is fighting only to save face and kin. But when Polydamas requests that Hector hold off a planned onslaught after an ill omen is spotted, Hector rebukes him for a coward: "Fight for your country -- that is the best, the only omen! You, why are you so afraid of war and slaughter?" (XII.281-2)
but you can find lots of other pages (http://www.google.com/search?num=100&hl=en&lr=&c2coff=1&rls=GGLG%2CGGLG%3A2006-10%2CGGLG%3Aen&q=hector+omen+fight+country) for this one.

Brotherhood = ΑΔΕΛΦΟΣΥΝΗ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: alpharhogammarho on 10 May, 2006, 22:21:31
I suppose you are referring to the famous "Ή τάν ή επί τάς" saying of the Spartans
------------------

Can you tell me how that means "conquer or die"? 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 10 May, 2006, 22:33:36
According to the Wikipedia link in the posting above:

Ή τάν ή επί τάς (I tan i epi tas): "This, or on this". This was the farewell phrase Spartan mothers or wives said to their departing warrior sons or husbands, upon giving them their shield. A warrior returning with his shield meant that he did not flee the battlefield. Had he done so, he must have dropped the large, heavy bronze shield in order to run faster. A warrior returning on his shield was dead, and his corpse would have been carried home thus. Therefore a Spartan warrior's options were to return either victorious or dead. Returning in shame without a shield was not an option. "Rhipsaspides" (shield droppers) were executed upon return, and their family members took part in the execution lest the shame of their cowardly relative stain the family reputation. The few Spartans who cowered in battle preferred to commit suicide rather than return to Sparta.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ~Eva~ on 18 May, 2006, 10:42:04
a suitable ancient greek symbol for a tattoo engraving

Consider the following:

the rod of Asclepius (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_of_Asclepius) (somewhat different from the caduceus)

acanthus (http://www.acanth.com/gallery/acanthus02.php)

thyrsus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyrsus) (Various pictures on google (http://images.google.com/images?svnum=100&hl=en&lr=&c2coff=1&rls=GGLG%2CGGLG%3A2006-10%2CGGLG%3Aen&q=thyrsus&btnG=Search))

horn of plenty (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornucopia) (cornucopia) [Google images (http://images.google.com/images?svnum=100&hl=en&lr=&c2coff=1&rls=GGLG%2CGGLG%3A2006-10%2CGGLG%3Aen&q=%22horn+of+plenty%22)]

triskelion (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triskelion)

Symbols.com (http://www.symbols.com/) is an excellent searchable online source for symbols.




Thank you very much for your assistance. It is greatly appreciated.
Title: Κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit, true to his inner daemon
Post by: pacman_133 on 18 May, 2006, 12:10:39
hey on jim Morrison's gravestone it has a Greek inscription reading KATA TON DAIMONA EAYTOY. I was just wondering if this is an accurate translation of "True to his own spirit" or not?
Title: Re: ΚΑΤΑ ΤΟΝ ΔΑΙΜΟΝΑ ΕΑΥΤΟΥ (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit
Post by: NadiaF on 18 May, 2006, 12:15:45
KATA TON DAIMONA EAYTOY. This Greek inscription means either "against the devil himself" or "against the devil within," depending on the context. ...
www.gadflyonline.com/9-24-01/TRAVEL-MORRISON.HTML

Ι would say "against the devil within him"
Title: Re: ΚΑΤΑ ΤΟΝ ΔΑΙΜΟΝΑ ΕΑΥΤΟΥ (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit
Post by: wings on 18 May, 2006, 12:19:25
Morrison's gravestone has a Greek inscription reading (as transcribed into Roman lettering) KATA TON DAIMONA EAYTOY. Various interpretations have been proposed, including, "down (presumably in Hell) with his own demons", "burnt by his demons", "with the devil himself." In ancient Greek, the word daimon means spirit rather than demon and contains no negative or pejorative qualities. The phrase is more properly translated as "True to his own spirit," and is the meaning intended by the Morrison family when the inscription was selected. It was Morrison's father who either selected the phrase or drafted it himself.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Morrison

Nadia, it can't be "against the devil" because in Greek it would be "κατά του δαίμονα".

Title: Re: ΚΑΤΑ ΤΟΝ ΔΑΙΜΟΝΑ ΕΑΥΤΟΥ (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit
Post by: wings on 18 May, 2006, 12:22:49
About Daemons:

For Greeks and Romans, daemons ("replete with knowledge", "divine power", "fate" or "god") were not necessarily evil. Socrates claimed to have a daimonion, a small daemon, that warned him against mistakes but never told him what to do or coerced him into following it. He claimed that his daimon exhibited greater accuracy than any of the forms of divination practised at the time. The Hellenistic Greeks divided daemons into good and evil categories: eudaemons (also called kalodaemons) and kakodaemons, respectively. Eudaemons resembled the Abrahamic idea of the guardian angel; they watched over mortals to help keep them out of trouble. (Thus eudaemonia, originally the state of having a eudaemon, came to mean "well-being" or "happiness".) A comparable Roman genius accompanied a person or protected and haunted a place (genius loci).

In Plato's Symposium, the priestess Diotima teaches Socrates that love is not a god, but rather a good daemon.

Daemons were important in Neo-Platonic philosophy. In the Christian reception of Platonism, the eudaemons were identified with the angels.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daemon_%28mythology%29

The Greek word DAIMON must not to be confused with "devil/evil" in Ancient Greece.
Title: Re: JIM MORRISONS GRAVE TRANSLATION
Post by: NadiaF on 18 May, 2006, 12:26:03
I agree with you Vicky in respect to the "against".

However, knowning Morrison's history, I would say that "daemons" here is used in the sense of "whatever plagued him", therefore perhaps "according to his inner daemon"?
Title: Re: ΚΑΤΑ ΤΟΝ ΔΑΙΜΟΝΑ ΕΑΥΤΟΥ (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit
Post by: wings on 18 May, 2006, 12:28:35
Then, you can never know what his inner daemon was (whether good or bad) and I think Wikipedia is right: spirit is a good word to express this ambiguity.
Title: Re: ΚΑΤΑ ΤΟΝ ΔΑΙΜΟΝΑ ΕΑΥΤΟΥ (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit
Post by: NadiaF on 18 May, 2006, 13:25:01
Knowing Morrison... his daemon was definitely BAAAAAAAD... :-)

But I agree with you, spirit is a good and general alternative. Although I prefer "daemon" having seen the grave and knowing who put the inscription there.

I prefer to think that it means "true to his inner daemon".
Title: Re: Κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit, true to his inner daemon
Post by: billberg23 on 18 May, 2006, 17:07:23
Yes, Heraclitus (6th cent. BC) said a man's character was his "daimon" — more or less an inner necessity, or destiny:  ΗΘΟΣ ΑΝΘΡΩΠΩΙ ΔΑΙΜΩΝ.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kuv on 19 May, 2006, 12:00:53
Well metl!

Browsing through Google-links while searching for a proper Spartian-shield emblem for a Η ΤΑΝ Η ΕΠΙ ΤΑΣ tattoo (previously covered), i stumbled into this here discussion. Mildy amused i read through peculiar requests- and although i'm at the office at the moment, million things to do, i went on reading.

 Two are the things that made me register and post this message.

Quote
Instead of the well-worn "strength and honour", one suggestion would be "ως φοίνιξ εκ της τέφρας του" (like a phoenix from its ashes). We have the same idiom, and this has the proper "ancient Greek" ring to it, though it is the title of a recent book.

The problem is that the phoenix has the wrong associations for a generation of Greeks as it was the emblem of the seven-year dictatorship (1967-74) (we would actually call it "the bird"). On the other hand, it is a worthy symbol with a long history and I hope our bitter memories of those years have not tarnished it for ever.

REASON 1)I actually have some feedback and maybe another suggestion here.

 
It is true that the image of the mythic creature was spoiled during the dictatorship where it was also used as a symbol. But in my humble opinion, a symbolic, ancient creature like the Phoenix could never be really tainted by the whims of men (much less by a handful of power-hungry mongrels). Furthermore, as Nickell said, the memories of the dictatorship tend to burden a single generation- the one before mine.

Most importantly (and this is what i "use" sometimes in conversations when friends jest at my phoenix tattoo) is that this Emblem was also used in the first real revolution flag of the greeks. This was the flag that was raised in Iasio, Moldavia (22 February 1821) by Alexandros Ipsiladis, and was blessed by the Holy Father Veniamin, four days later. This pattern was sanctioned by the Filiki Eteria (Society of Friends), the group that actually fuelled the revolution and was carried by the Holy Company in Dragatsani and in the massacre of the Sekou monastery. It bore the image of a flaming phoenix, along with:

"ΕΚ ΤΗΣ ΚΟΝΕΩΣ ΜΟΥ ΑΝΑΓΕΝΝΩΜΑΙ" = From my ashes, i rise.

Just another option for you, from personal experience.


REASON 2) The second reason is to salute Nickel, as i was totally awe-stricken by his meticulous answers and his warm willingness to answer even the most outrageous demands with sheer professionalism. In other words.

ΝΙΚΕΛ, Σ'ΩΡΑΙΟΣ ΡΕ! :)

Salutations to all the other mods of course (none excluded) and everyone that contributes- you made a passer-by pause, register and post a long one, and that's an achievement. :)

That said, i'm bookmarking this fine web-place and will be browsing through the other sections when given the time. See you later :)




Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 19 May, 2006, 16:18:58
Τώρα που ξεκοκκίνισα, να ευχαριστήσω κι εγώ για την πληροφορία. Η εντύπωσή μου ήταν ότι η σημαία του Ιερού Λόχου έγραφε "εκ της τέφρας μου αναγεννώμαι". Ωστόσο, και στην Εγκυκλοπαίδεια του Δρανδάκη, αναφέρει τη δική σου εκδοχή: "Εκ της κόνεώς μου αναγεννώμαι".

Με την ευκαιρία, να κοτσάρω εδώ και τη γνωστή σύνθεση του Peter von Hess:

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.parliament.gr%2F1821%2Fimages%2Fekthemata%2Fbig%2Ff19.jpg&hash=ebd019afa386a615eb7409d4936fd13a3427b363)
Title: Eternal love or Undying love
Post by: jen luci on 20 May, 2006, 17:16:59
Hi! I need help with this translation. It is for a tattoo. Any help is appreciated! I'm looking for something along the lines of eternal love or undying love.

Jenny
Title: Re: Eternal love or Undying love
Post by: banned8 on 20 May, 2006, 17:21:50
I'm looking for something along the lines of eternal love or undying love.
Jenny

See https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=3025.msg8832#msg8832
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: LarsKatz on 27 May, 2006, 23:33:57
I have an appointment to get a tattoo of the phrase "know thyself" on June 6th, but before I decide to go through with it, I want to be 100% sure of the authenticity of the translation. I just graduated with a BA in philosophy, and this is my way of commemorating those four years. My goal is to make sure that it is as authentic to the period of time when Socrates was alive as possible (his trial and death were in 399 BC). I know this translation has been briefly mentioned in this forum before, but I thought my questions might provoke a bit more depth into the history of the phrase and the language. I'm very unfamiliar with Greek, its dialects (ancient and modern), and the periods of time that various diacritic marks are characteristic to, but my brief and humble research has led me to the following formulations:

The most common version:

γνώθι σεαυτόν

A variation that I found in this forum:

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.larskatz.com%2Fimages%2FGnothi_sauton.gif&hash=6af7e9f33e5c60f9cddeff9eb7eb1185eed25534)

(I've also seen versions of the above two with a capital letter on either the first word or both)

The completely capitalized version:

ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ

...and two versions that claim to be "ancient" Greek:

Ãíþèé Óáõôüí

Ãíþèé Óåáõôüí

The link to the place where I found the last two is: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/784478

Any help would greatly appreciated! Also, any direction as to a font with a little more authenticity or character than Times New Roman would be great! Thanks very much.

-Lars
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 28 May, 2006, 00:07:22
The Proz.com Greek has become garbled as a result of a recent conversion of that site to UTF-8 that has not been very successful with Greek. You have to copy-paste that answer (which belongs to our member and moderator Wings) into Word, and use its Fix Broken Text function to get pretty much what you have here -- to be exact, an explanation of how "σεαυτόν" has become "σαυτόν".

My advice: Go for the second option (your "Gnothi_sauton.gif"), as you will see in the title of this book (http://www.protoporia.gr/protoporia/product.asp?sku=102805&mscssid=PUGTAECL3F4B8JFGMKAG9H89FMSC5MNE) or in the following dictionary entry.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 28 May, 2006, 00:20:22
Thanks, Nick. Actually Greek in this entry of mine in Proz.com is now absolutely illegible though it looked great at the time the entry was made.

I totally agree with you. Lars, you should go for your second option.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: LarsKatz on 29 May, 2006, 11:12:22
Thank you both so much for your replies! Just wanted to share my final image that I'm going to take down to the tattoo parlor when the time comes. I want to double check that everything still looks alright as I changed the original image a little to combine some elements of the Times New Roman font that I liked better. Would one of you mind verifying that it still has the same meaning?

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.larskatz.com%2Fimages%2Fgnothi_seauthon.JPG&hash=2d574974991b1760c4275d3637f200f7057e93ca)

It does indeed still say "know thyself" right?

I'm also curious: is there a reason you don't see the first two diacritical markings present in this image (that look like a tilda and a comma) hardly anywhere anymore? Is it because of the simplification of the language in 1982 where they did away with most of the diacritical marks? Or because of computer translation issues? I just find it interesting that I didn't find them anywhere outside of this forum.

Thanks again for your help!
-Lars
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 29 May, 2006, 11:20:22
Hi Lars.

It looks perfect and you can definitely go for it.

The absence of accents has nothing to do with computers. The official Greek language changed 30 years ago to monotonic. So, nowadays, we would say "γνώθι σαυτόν".

Good luck!!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: LarsKatz on 30 May, 2006, 04:38:55
Thanks again very much wings! If you have the time or interest, would you mind resending me the info on the Proz.com site with the proper (non-garbled) words that we were talking about? I'm really curious about the history of the word. If you don't have the time I totally understand. You've already helped a ton!

-Lars
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 30 May, 2006, 04:43:00
Vicky's ProZ.com entry reads:

Γνώθι Σεαυτόν
Τhe original reflexive pronoun was "σεαυτόν" (=accusative of the 3rd person reflexive pronoun). Out of a grammatical phenomenon called "συναρπαγή" (quite close to synaeresis) this compound word (σέ + αυτόν = you yourself) has become "σαυτόν".

"Γνώθι Σαυτόν", you mention in your question, is absolutely authentic and correct, since in Socrates' era both forms were acceptable.

The reflexive pronoun of the second person was found in the genitive, dative and accusative cases for both singular and plural as follows:

Singular
σεαυτού (or σαυτού) [genitive]
σεαυτώ (or σαυτώ) [dative]
σεαυτόν (or σαυτόν) [accusative]

Plural
υμών αυτών [genitive]
υμίν αυτοίς [dative]
υμάς αυτούς [accusative]

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: LarsKatz on 30 May, 2006, 10:09:56
Thanks! What a fascinating language! I'll post a picture of the tattoo when I get it in a week.

You guys are the best!

-Lars
Title: Re: LIFE IS WHAT YOU MAKE IT
Post by: greenzy on 06 Jun, 2006, 15:17:42
i am a student just like LARS and have been thinking of getting a tatoo which means a lot to me...so when i saw this qoute by Hermane Melville it just struck me and i then thought this is the one to get!!!

It reads-LIFE IS WHAT YOU MAKE IT- i have seen other translations in greek but im not too sure of the one i have but really i would want to get an ancient greek translation...so please would you help me on this..??

.....neil....
Title: Re: For Those Who Believe, Their Dreams Will Come True
Post by: derekdublin on 11 Jun, 2006, 13:16:43
Hi, I myself am thinking about getting a tattoo and have been searching the internet for months now to try find a suitable translation page. From reading the prior posts i can see i have found it.

I am looking for a sayin to be translated into Ancient Greek, it is
"For Those Who Believe,
Their Dreams Will Come True".

Could anyone try to translate this for me or offer any suitable alternatives if there is no translation for it. Any Help would be greatly appreciated.
Title: Strength - Knowledge
Post by: uofoduck on 12 Jun, 2006, 05:19:13
I am looking for the transaltion of both of these words.  I am looking for the word Strength or Power and would like to know how it looks in lowercase and uppercase.  I am also looking for the same for the word knowledge.  Both of these are to be tattooed but of course on my back.  I am half greek and decided it is high time I begin learning the language and heritage. 

Thank you in advance.

uofoduck
Title: Re: Strength - Knowledge
Post by: wings on 12 Jun, 2006, 11:22:24
Hi there.

Strength =  δύναμη, ΔΥΝΑΜΗ or ισχύς, ΙΣΧΥΣ

Ιn Ancient Greek: δύναμις, ΔΥΝΑΜΙΣ οr ισχύς, ΙΣΧΥΣ

Knowledge = γνώση, ΓΝΩΣΗ

In Ancient Greek: γνώσις, ΓΝΩΣΙΣ


Title: Re: For Those Who Believe, Their Dreams Will Come True
Post by: derekdublin on 12 Jun, 2006, 13:45:01
Hi Wings,

Just wondering if you know any translation to my saying or know of any similar sayings to it.

Cheers
Title: Re: For Those Who Believe, Their Dreams Will Come True
Post by: wings on 12 Jun, 2006, 13:53:19
Hi derekdublin.

We have not forgotten you and your question. But it is more difficult to answer. I am afraid I cannot think of any Ancient Greek translation for your phrase or anything similar to it.

Isn't this phrase rather too long for a tattoo, though?
Title: Re: For Those Who Believe, Their Dreams Will Come True
Post by: derekdublin on 12 Jun, 2006, 14:43:04
I was think of gettin it on my lower back and in two lines so might be ok. i was also thinkin of just getting the word Believe. Could u send me ancient greek for that. Thanks again Wings
Title: Re: For Those Who Believe, Their Dreams Will Come True
Post by: wings on 12 Jun, 2006, 14:47:18
Believe (verb) (as in "I believe in you/God/UFOs...") = πιστεύω, ΠΙΣΤΕΥΩ

If you need the noun, i.e. beliefπίστις, ΠΙΣΤΙΣ
Title: Re: The dreams of believers come true
Post by: banned8 on 12 Jun, 2006, 14:53:06
Των πιστευόντων τα όνειρα επαληθεύονται.

The dreams of those who believe come true.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: derekdublin on 12 Jun, 2006, 14:59:45
Thats Great, Thank you very much for both replies. I think i will go with the saying as opposed to the word. Thank you again.
Title: Re: Strength - Knowledge
Post by: uofoduck on 16 Jun, 2006, 05:37:07
Hi there.

Strength =  δύναμη, ΔΥΝΑΜΗ or ισχύς, ΙΣΧΥΣ

Ιn Ancient Greek: δύναμις, ΔΥΝΑΜΙΣ οr ισχύς, ΙΣΧΥΣ

Knowledge = γνώση, ΓΝΩΣΗ

In Ancient Greek: γνώσις, ΓΝΩΣΙΣ




Is there any difference in the interpretation of the two strength words or is it really just a matter of which one I find more visually pleasing?  A greek relative said that Dynamis is the greek word for power or strength.  Is one of these either of those?

Thank you again
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 16 Jun, 2006, 10:53:35
"Δύναμις" is the Greek word for "strength" mainly while "ισχύς" means power (power of character but also electric power).

I suppose you can just choose "δύναμις".
Title: And the first dawn of creation wrote - What the last dusk of reckoning shall read.
Post by: zimzallabim on 18 Jun, 2006, 02:48:59
Hey just wondering if some one could please translate this for me into greek. Have been trying myself but the online computer translation tools are useless and merely put it into litererary form ignoring grammar and tenses. If some one could possibly email the translation to me (if anyone wants to translate it that is!) that would be a great help as I'm rarely on the net these days. Would like to have it asap as well as I am planning to have the translation as a tattoo! Any help at all would be much appreciated, just hope some ones willing to take the time to help me.
Many thanks,
Zim
Title: Re: And the first dawn of creation wrote - What the last dusk of reckoning shall read.
Post by: banned8 on 18 Jun, 2006, 03:08:21
Ό,τι γράφτηκε κατά την αυγή της Δημιουργίας, αυτό θα διαβαστεί την ημέρα της Κρίσεως.
i.e.: What was written on the dawn of Creation shall be read on the day of Reckoning.


Closer to the original (personified):
Η αυγή της Δημιουργίας έγραψε αυτό που η μέρα της Κρίσεως θα διαβάσει.
i.e. The dawn of Creation wrote what the day of Reckoning shall read.

Let's wait and see if anyone else has any brighter ideas.

Title: Re: And the first dawn of creation wrote - What the last dusk of reckoning shall read.
Post by: wings on 18 Jun, 2006, 11:34:23
Hi Nick.

I second your second option.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: zimzallabim on 18 Jun, 2006, 23:08:32
Ignore my last post i was unaware that i had already asked the question! thanks so much for the translation! I really appreciate you going to the time and effort to translate it for me.
thank you once again,
Zim
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Amiko on 19 Jun, 2006, 19:07:40
Is ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ (the completely capitalized version) wrong?

What is the diference between "ΣΑΥΤΟΝ" and "ΣEΑΥΤΟΝ"?

I want to do a tattoo like had wrote in Temple of Apollo at Delphi. How is?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Jun, 2006, 17:56:20
Is ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ (the completely capitalized version) wrong?

Stick to this form. Explanations are given in a number of messages after this:
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=6949222.msg22615#msg22615
Title: I live, I love, I laugh
Post by: banned8 on 20 Jun, 2006, 22:41:45
How about this?
Title: Vigilant Guardian
Post by: jackthepumpkinking on 25 Jun, 2006, 15:05:43
Hiya,

I read the last topic about tattoos and ancient greek, hopefully this will be an ok one to translate. Am looking for 'Vigilant Guardian' in ancient greek. It's to go underneath an existing tattoo of a gryphon i got done the other year. Would really apprecitate someone's help.

Thanks

Andy
Title: Re: Vigilant Guardian
Post by: wings on 25 Jun, 2006, 15:12:28
Ηi there.

I would say:

Άγρυπνος φρουρός

or

Άγρυπνος φύλαξ

Τhe first one literally means "never-sleeping guard" but it is a very common expression in Greek. The second option means "never sleeping guardian". I would go for the first one.
Title: Re: Vigilant Guardian
Post by: jackthepumpkinking on 25 Jun, 2006, 15:36:12
Thanks

The gryphon is actualy asleep so that fits nicely!

Thanks again
Title: kapogines
Post by: ak on 27 Jun, 2006, 23:59:51
i want to get a tattoo with my last name 'Kapogines' in greek letters but i dont know how to translate. help me please.
Title: Re: kapogines
Post by: banned8 on 28 Jun, 2006, 00:17:00
My guess is Καπογκίνης. I can't find it on Google or the phone company pages, but Γκίνης is quite a common name and Καπο (from the Italian for 'head') is often found at the beginning of names.
Title: Re: Purpose Driven Life
Post by: uofoduck on 28 Jun, 2006, 02:53:56
Can someone please tattoo "Purpose Driven Life" or a similar saying into modern and possibly ancient greek.

Thank you for all you guys do.
Title: Re: Purpose Driven Life
Post by: Πρωτέαs on 28 Jun, 2006, 03:34:46
Maybe: Ο ΣΚΟΠΟΣ ΑΓΙΑΖΕΙ ΤΑ ΜΕΣΑ....
OR you can wait for Nickel to give you something better....

Is this the title of a Rick Warren's book? The Purpose-driven life: What on earth am I here for?
Title: Re: Purpose Driven Life
Post by: wings on 28 Jun, 2006, 11:24:48
Stavroula, this is not the point of the phrase. Please look at: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=6949344.new#new
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mediobogdum on 04 Jul, 2006, 01:07:59
   
    Good Afternoon, thank you very much for contributing you time to this free service. I would very much appreciate the following
in Attic Greek which I believe would have been the way he wrote it.

Cleomenes in his work entitled Concerning Pedagogues says that the friends of Diogenes wanted to
ransom him, whereupon he called them simpletons; for, said he, lions are not the slaves of those who
feed them, but rather those who feed them are at the mercy of the lions: for fear is the mark of the
slave, whereas wild beasts make men afraid of them.


    The italisized portion is all that I really need. The attribution would be nice but not strictly neccesary.
   
    Thank you very much for your time.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 04 Jul, 2006, 01:27:11
Here it is from my TLG. However, I'm too slow with the polytonic keyboard, so if any of the other members feels like typing it out in polytonic Greek, I'd be grateful.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mediobogdum on 05 Jul, 2006, 16:10:53
    Thank you very much.
Title: Re: Κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit, true to his inner daemon
Post by: pacman_133 on 06 Jul, 2006, 05:08:42
well if jim morrisons grave inscription doesnt mean "true to his own spirit" what would be an accurate translation of "true to his own spirit"??(in ancient greek or modern)

please help me out somebody!
Title: Re: Κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit, true to his inner daemon
Post by: banned8 on 06 Jul, 2006, 06:04:36
It means exactly that.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, demon:

1a. In ancient Greek mythology (=δαίμων): A supernatural being of a nature intermediate between that of gods and men; an inferior divinity, spirit, genius (including the souls or ghosts of deceased persons, esp. deified heroes).
1b. Sometimes, particularly, An attendant, ministering, or indwelling spirit; a genius. (Chiefly in references to the so-called ‘dæmon of Socrates’. Socrates himself claimed to be guided, not by a δαίμων, but by a δαιμόνιον, divinum quiddam (Cicero), a certain divine principle or agency, an inward monitor or oracle. It was his accusers who represented this as a personal dæmon, and the same was done by the Christian Fathers (under the influence of sense 2 = evil spirit), whence the English use of the word.

The God of Socrates by Apuleius puts forth the view of the nature of the Daemon prior to the Judaeo-Christian corruption of that character to Demon.
Much was made by the Stoics about «δαίμων εαυτού».

«Κατά» means «according to», therefore «κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού» means “according to his own daemon/genius”. That is, Jim Morrison lived according to his own conscience. He was true to his own spirit.
Title: Re: Κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit, true to his inner daemon
Post by: Πρωτέαs on 07 Jul, 2006, 03:53:01
The word δαίμων came from the word δαήμων.
Δαήμων was also Homer's father.
According to mythology he was (Δαήμων) half-man half-god.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kalypso on 12 Jul, 2006, 15:17:58
Live as if your were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever
Is anyone able to translate this to ancient greek
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 12 Jul, 2006, 22:27:36
The Ancients were stuck with that old adage "Γηράσκω δ' αεί πολλά διδασκόμενος" (I grow old, constantly learning many things) and I don't think they had anything like the one you want, nor can I translate this one (attributed to Gandhi, right?) into adequately pithy ancient Greek.

However, here's my modern Greek take on that:

Ζήσε σαν να πρόκειται να πεθάνεις αύριο. Μάθαινε σαν να πρόκειται να ζήσεις αιώνια.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rockforce on 14 Jul, 2006, 10:07:15
Heya!

Was browsing the net today for a translation of how the Spartans would have writen "Spartans" in ancient greek and this site seemed to be the best place to ask for advice. So thanks in advance for the translation.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 14 Jul, 2006, 13:11:34
ΣΠΑΡΤΙΑΤΑΙ, e.g. in Thucydides.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ebeth333 on 17 Jul, 2006, 18:49:24
Yasas!!
I have been reading and you guys are great!  I am greek and currently live in the USA.   I want to get a tattoo in memory of my mother.  She was from Athens and recently passed away.  I was looking to get something written in greek like:  love for my mother, in memory of Kyriaki,  mother or something like that..Suggestions would be kindly appreciated....Thanks, Liza
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kalypso on 23 Jul, 2006, 08:13:04
Yes indeed Gandhi!!! so the modern version you gave me is that how u would suspect it is written today? ! thanks again!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Pinky on 23 Jul, 2006, 13:29:29
Hi,

I am new here and read all 16 pages of the tattoo topic. My first idea (I had it for quite a while) was to put " what doesn't kill me makes me stronger" on my arm as a 10 year after my accident tattoo...but reading all these phrases in Greek I've noticed it is a ..positive language and you all try to "remove" the agressive and voilent words.
The thing is I want a tattoo with a special meaning (i will try to explain)
10 years ago on the 9th of august I was shot to be killed by a former friend. (sorry if I shocked anyone with the blunt way of saying it). Unfortunally for him I survived. 5 years ago on "the" date I took a tattoo with the date 9-8-96 in chinese characters and a butterfly flying around it as a sort of freedom.
last year this so called friend killed himself and his new girlfriend and that had me thinking he didn't kill me and after 10 years I have everything I want so in a way he made me stronger right.. ( i have to add he put me in a wheelchair so there is a small scar).

My question is.. I adore the greek myths and gods and want a phrase in Greek to close the 10 years.
I don't want the word kill on my body but i want something strong and powerfull... you know what I mean?

Can someone help me with a good phrase for a young woman surviving in this world?

thank you,
Pinky
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 23 Jul, 2006, 14:13:40
Yes indeed Gandhi!!! so the modern version you gave me is that how u would suspect it is written today? ! thanks again!

Yes, indeed, Kalypso. That's exactly how I would write today. (And many others, I suspect, or we would have them correcting it.)

Ebeth and Pinky, we're thinking. I'm sure you can hear the cogs whirring.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Jul, 2006, 19:06:01
Here are a couple of possibilities, at least until someone comes up with a better one:
ANTEXEY ("hang in there!").  Archilochus (7th cent. BC) said this to encourage his own spirit.
AIΩΝ  ΠΑΝΤΑ  ΦΕΡΕΙ ("time accomplishes all things").  Attributed to Plato (4th cent. BC)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: charisanne on 24 Jul, 2006, 17:32:33
i think maybe the message should be of hope. perhaps the latin dum spiro spero (while i breathe i hope) or non sum qualis eram (i am not what i once was). there's probably a greek translation.

charis x
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Pinky on 24 Jul, 2006, 19:33:24
it has to be a strong meaning. but not agressive..
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Traveler on 27 Jul, 2006, 07:20:56
I’ve been wondering what the Greek of classical times (i.e. Plato and Homer), and the Greek of the Bible translation is for traveler.  So far I’ve found ταξιδιώτης and ΤΑΞΙΔΙΏΤΗΣ.  They both mean traveler/voyager. 

I’d like the tattoo to be on my left forearm and to represent my life as a traveler.  I’ve been all over the world and want the tattoo to best represent my travels to far out places and my adventurous spirit.  I'd love to know which words you think would best fit my tattoo. 

Thanks 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Jul, 2006, 08:57:08
Actually, ταξιδιώτης and ΤΑΞΙΔΙΩΤΗΣ are the same word (the latter is simply in capital letters), the modern Greek word for "traveller."  The ancients used the word ΟΔΟΙΠΟΡΟΣ (I'm going to use all capitals here, unless you tell me you need lower case), which means "wayfarer."  Odysseus, whose homeward journey involved ten years of travel, was called ΠΛΑΝΗΤΗΣ -- literally, a wanderer.  You might prefer this word to designate a more romantic sense of travel.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Jul, 2006, 13:49:11
ΟΔΟΙΠΟΡΟΣ is also the word used in the Bible for 'traveller'.

In Sirach, 26:12:

ὡς διψῶν ὁδοιπόρος τὸ στόμα ἀνοίξει καὶ ἀπὸ παντὸς ὕδατος τοῦ σύνεγγυς πίεται
(She will open her mouth, as a thirsty traveller when he hath found a fountain, and drink of every water near her)

You might go for the word for 'wanderer', but I would choose the form ΠΛΑΝΗΣ, still used with that meaning to this day (while ΠΛΑΝΗΤΗΣ is now the word for 'planet' only).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Traveler on 27 Jul, 2006, 20:21:44
Thank you so much billberg and nickel, I've been looking everywhere for the correct usage of these words.  What would ΠΛΑΝΗΣ look like in lowercase and what would ΟΔΟΙΠΟΡΟΣ be in lowercase?  Would you guys recomend upper or lower case if i were to get this tattooed on my forearm?  Thanks again for the help, it's saved a lot of trouble in searching : )
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Jul, 2006, 20:28:36
Here they are in both lower and upper case. Use either, whichever pleases the eye most. Ancient Greek was in upper case only.

ὁδοιπόρος

πλάνης

ΟΔΟΙΠΟΡΟΣ

ΠΛΑΝΗΣ
Title: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: cavscout on 29 Jul, 2006, 03:48:56
want  modern translation for "christ is my navigator"

If it can be transtlated into new-testiment era Greek with no negative issues, that would be even better.

Thanks.
Title: Re: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: banned8 on 29 Jul, 2006, 13:14:53
Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός.

or, in the older system of accents:

Πλοηγὸς μου εἶναι ὁ Χριστός.

Sorry, but πλοηγός is only about 120 years old. I don't think there's an appropriate word in the Bible. After all, Christ is usually our shepherd.

Title: Re: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: kat of cicero on 29 Jul, 2006, 13:22:12
Τείνω να συμφωνήσω.
Πλοηγός για navigator / ποιμήν (-μένας) για Shepherd (Lord is My Shepherd, I shall not want etc).
k.o.k.
Title: Re: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: banned8 on 29 Jul, 2006, 13:53:17
Και μέχρι λίμνη της Γαλιλαίας, έτσι;

Παραπέρα, στους ωκεανούς και τις φουρτούνες, συμφέρει να τα 'χεις καλά και με Ποσειδώνα και όλους τους άλλους. :-}
Title: Re: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: wings on 29 Jul, 2006, 13:55:09
Ίσως και, πιο ελεύθερα, «οδηγός».
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: sweden on 29 Jul, 2006, 15:08:33
Hi,

I live in Sweden but my father is from Greece. I am going to tattoo my kids names on my arms and to honor the roots we come from I would like to put it in Greek letters. That´s why I need the names Elias and Alexander to be translated. Is there anyone who can help me with that?

Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned13 on 29 Jul, 2006, 15:25:38
Hi,

I live in Sweden but my father is from Greece. I am going to tattoo my kids names on my arms and to honor the roots we come from I would like to put it in Greek letters. That´s why I need the names Elias and Alexander to be translated. Is there anyone who can help me with that?

Thanks in advance!

Elias is Ηλίας or in capital letters ΗΛΙΑΣ.
Alexander is Αλέξανδρος and in capital letters ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ.

Title: Re: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Jul, 2006, 17:19:11
Cavscout's request reminds me a bit of "God is My Co-Pilot," title of an old WWII propaganda film about the bombing of Tokyo.  Fortunately these days no one would be so inept and tasteless as to involve the gentle deity in military action.  Yes, leave that to robust ancient gods like Poseidon. 
Title: Re: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: kat of cicero on 29 Jul, 2006, 17:40:05
Ha ha great quotation and in full accordance with the analysis i am trying to achieve between militarism , mass psycholoogy and formation of national identity.

As Anderson delicately put it " there is a strong affinity with religious imaginings" if not (in the worst case) complete replacement of religious rituals with secularist militarism.

Νικο προσπαθώ να τα έχω καλά με όλους σε οριζόντιο και κάθετο άξονα. Ειδικά μετά τη Γαλιλαία....
Είτε μιλάμε για καταγραφικό χάρτη είτε... για χάρτη προτάσεων σχεδιασμού....

Αλλά κι ο Ποσειδώνας μόνος του τί να πρωτοπρολάβει....; Τη Μαύρη, την Κασπία.... ποια;...
Title: Re: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: wings on 29 Jul, 2006, 17:48:30
Αλλά κι ο Ποσειδώνας μόνος του τί να πρωτοπρολάβει....; Τη Μαύρη, την Κασπία.... ποια;...

Ο Ποσειδώνας θεός είναι κι όλα τα προλαβαίνει άμα θέλει... άσε που έχει και καλή φυσική κατάσταση γιατί είναι στα μπάνια χειμώνα καλοκαίρι.:-)))
Title: Re: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: kat of cicero on 29 Jul, 2006, 17:54:32
Σωστη.... δεν το ειχα σκεφτεί... Θα μπορούσε λοιπον ένας διεστραμμένος νους (όχι ο δικός μου) να πλασάρει για λόγκο των Ειδικών Δυνάμεων τον Ποσειδώνα ΟΥΚ-α...
Ιδού πως πλάθεται ο Μύθος του Στρατιωτικού Πνεύματος...

Κι εδώ άρχισε να βρέχει....

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jamasiel on 01 Aug, 2006, 06:21:43
You people are wonderful - I came here from a search for Greek lettering and tattoos, but I can see how this would be a good community as I begin learning the language soon!

A meaningful story between my fiancee (from Aspa Spitia) and I is that of Eros and Psyche.  We sort of built our own story of meeting and dating early on around the concepts within the mythology, and it's come to symbolize much for us.  So I decided my first tattoo would commemorate this - people say it is bad luck to get your beloved's name tattoo'ed on you, but I figured this stands enough for deeper principles that it both applied to our relationship and to the eternal ideals behind it.

Anyway, I took it from the title of a painting depicting a scene from the story:
ο έρωτας ξυπνά την ψυχή
to my understanding, and as far as she can tell over Instant Message (she went home for several weeks to deal with some family matters) this is accurate, so I wanted to verify that - but I also wanted to see if this fits the notion and poetic feel of the expression - Eros (Love) awakens Psyche (the Soul)...am I making sense here?

My thanks and I look forward to talking with you all!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 01 Aug, 2006, 09:18:31
Anyway, I took it from the title of a painting depicting a scene from the story:
ο έρωτας ξυπνά την ψυχή
to my understanding, and as far as she can tell over Instant Message (she went home for several weeks to deal with some family matters) this is accurate, so I wanted to verify that - but I also wanted to see if this fits the notion and poetic feel of the expression - Eros (Love) awakens Psyche (the Soul)s and I look forward to talking with you all!

As far as the title of the painting is concerned, it would be accurate only insofar as it describes the action depicted in the painting (Eros awakening the sleeping Psyche).  But I'm grateful that you got me to thinking about the title as a more general statement of fact:  Eros does indeed awaken the Psyche, for better or for worse.  The ancients compared this awakening to a shot from the bow of Eros, whose arrow was known as the γλυκύπικρον Έρωτος βέλος, the "bittersweet dart of Eros."  So you would be wearing a tattoo that spoke of a reality that is sometimes ecstatic, and sometimes grim.  If you don't care for that sort of ambiguity, you might think of wearing simply the two names "Eros" and "Psyche" to commemorate your love.  Felicitations, by the way, and may your relationship prosper!
Title: Re: Christ is my navigator -> Πλοηγός μου είναι ο Χριστός
Post by: cavscout on 02 Aug, 2006, 05:07:09
Cavscout's request reminds me a bit of "God is My Co-Pilot," title of an old WWII propaganda film about the bombing of Tokyo.  Fortunately these days no one would be so inept and tasteless as to involve the gentle deity in military action.  Yes, leave that to robust ancient gods like Poseidon. 

Nothing so morbid as that. It will be writen over a nautical star with a cross in the middle of it, for a tattoo. "navigator" as in compass or guide, see?


Thanks for the help everyone.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: leonidas8 on 05 Aug, 2006, 08:14:12
Hey guys.  I'm looking for a translation of a phrase from (I believe) Thucydides.  I have it in Latin but can't find it in Ancient Greek.  Any help would be greatly appreciated!
"then we shall fight in the shade"

Also, if you could reply with it in both lower case and upper case that would be great.  Thanks again!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Aug, 2006, 10:09:56
That would be from Herodotus, Book 7, paragraph 226.  A Spartan named Dienekes promises a Trachinian that, even if the Persians darken the sun with the number of their arrows (as the Trachinian fears), it will be perfectly OK because then "the fight against them will be in the shade," and not in the sun.  The words you want are
Υπό σκιή έσοιτο πρός αυτούς η μάχη
or (in upper case)  ΥΠΟ  ΣΚΙΗΙ  ΕΣΟΙΤΟ  Η  ΜΑΧΗ.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: leonidas8 on 05 Aug, 2006, 11:59:49
That would be from Herodotus, Book 7, paragraph 226.  A Spartan named Dienekes promises a Trachinian that, even if the Persians darken the sun with the number of their arrows (as the Trachinian fears), it will be perfectly OK because then "the fight against them will be in the shade," and not in the sun.  The words you want are
Υπό σκιή έσοιτο πρός αυτούς η μάχη
or (in upper case)  ΥΠΟ  ΣΚΙΗΙ  ΕΣΟΙΤΟ  Η  ΜΑΧΗ.

So why do two of the words drop out when switching from lower to upper case?  And thank you for the correction, I thought it was either Herodotus or Thucydides.  Thank you so much again for you help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 05 Aug, 2006, 13:23:40
That would be from Herodotus, Book 7, paragraph 226.  A Spartan named Dienekes promises a Trachinian that, even if the Persians darken the sun with the number of their arrows (as the Trachinian fears), it will be perfectly OK because then "the fight against them will be in the shade," and not in the sun.  The words you want are
Υπό σκιή έσοιτο πρός αυτούς η μάχη
or (in upper case)  ΥΠΟ  ΣΚΙΗΙ  ΕΣΟΙΤΟ  Η  ΜΑΧΗ.

So why do two of the words drop out when switching from lower to upper case?And thank you for the correction, I thought it was either Herodotus or Thucydides. Thank you so much again for you help!

Ηello.

Bill omitted the two words because the original text does not say "then we shall fight in the shade" (as in your question) but "the fight against them will be in the shade" as explained in Bill's message.

To make it fit your phrase, we have to omit the "against them" part ("προς αυτούς").

If you don't use the upper case as suggested by Bill, the original accented text (with these two words crossed-out) should be as follows (or as in the picture):

ὑπὸ σκιῇ ἔσοιτο πρὸς αὐτοὺς ἡ μάχη
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Aug, 2006, 14:37:25
I had simply "nodded" when I wrote the upper case, failing to transcribe ΠΡΟΣ ΑΥΤΟΥΣ, which, as Wings points out, was irrelevant to your original request.  Sorry for the confusion.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: leonidas8 on 05 Aug, 2006, 23:19:41
I had simply "nodded" when I wrote the upper case, failing to transcribe ΠΡΟΣ ΑΥΤΟΥΣ, which, as Wings points out, was irrelevant to your original request.  Sorry for the confusion.

Not a problem, it makes sense now.  Thank you two again for your time and help!!
Title: unbroken spirit
Post by: beastuk1 on 16 Aug, 2006, 16:54:00
unbroken spirit
Title: Re: unbroken spirit
Post by: wings on 16 Aug, 2006, 16:57:07
Forum Rule 1.5
If you ask for translation help, please limit your query to 12 words and ALWAYS provide CONTEXT.  

Please read all forum rules (https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=35.0) carefully. Thanks in advance.:-)
Title: Re: unbroken spirit
Post by: beastuk1 on 16 Aug, 2006, 17:02:21
Sorry I am wanting to know the correct Greek for Unbroken Spirit as in the context of "My s
Spirit remains Unbroken through all the obstacles I have faced".
Kind Regards,
Title: Re: unbroken spirit
Post by: wings on 16 Aug, 2006, 17:12:24
Then you can say "ακμαίο ηθικό".

The whole phrase: Το ηθικό μου παραμένει ακμαίο παρά τα εμπόδια που βρήκα στο δρόμο μου/συνάντησα/αντιμετώπισα.
Title: Re: unbroken spirit
Post by: beastuk1 on 16 Aug, 2006, 17:16:13
Thank you very much for that, could you also answer why when I translate the words "Unbroken Spirit" from English to Greek on different sites I get different versions, for example I also got this 'ακατάβλητο πνεύμα'. Which one is the defnitive representation of 'Unbroken Spirit' in Greek?
Kind Regards,
Title: Re: unbroken spirit
Post by: wings on 16 Aug, 2006, 17:22:22
"ακατάβλητο πνεύμα" is also a very good expression, perhaps more suitable to translate "unbending spirit".

What you are asking for is not a scientific term to have a definite form. It all depends on the whole text and the translator. It's good to have a lot of alternatives, isn't it?
Title: Re: unbroken spirit
Post by: beastuk1 on 16 Aug, 2006, 17:26:41
Thank you for your help in this and it is good to have different variations but I am having the words tattoed on my arm and would like them to be as near as possible to the English meaning as it is a very personal statment to me. Would you advise that I go with the version that you supplied as it is closer to the idea of "My spirit remains unbroken"?

Once again kind regards,
Title: Re: unbroken spirit
Post by: wings on 16 Aug, 2006, 17:29:49
Τhen you can say "Hθικόν ακμαίον" (in the upper case "ΗΘΙΚΟΝ ΑΚΜΑΙΟΝ") which means "spirit unbroken" and it will be fine.:-)
Title: Re: unbroken spirit
Post by: banned8 on 16 Aug, 2006, 17:37:48
why when I translate the words "Unbroken Spirit" from English to Greek on different sites I get different versions

That's because the Greek words for "unbroken", ancient or modern, e.g. άθραυστος, άρρηκτος, αρραγής, άκλαστος, do not combine (collocate) with "πνεύμα" or "ηθικό".

As a result you get different translations, for example:
ακμαίο ηθικό = high morale
ακατάβλητο πνεύμα = indomitable / unbending spirit
αδάμαστο πνεύμα = untamed spirit
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Joker23 on 28 Aug, 2006, 21:16:54
A while back I came here and received help translating a bible verse for my left arm.  Today I come seeking assistance for the right. :)

I was hoping to find this one be searching, and had no luck.

I was looking for a translation of Matthew 5:8, one of the beatitudes.

"Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God"

Thanks in advance!

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 28 Aug, 2006, 21:28:20
I was looking for a translation of Matthew 5:8, one of the beatitudes.

"Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God"


And there you go:

Μακάριοι οι καθαροί τη καρδία, ότι αυτοί τον θεόν όψονται

[The same phrase in the upper case: ΜΑΚΑΡΙΟΙ ΟΙ ΚΑΘΑΡΟΙ ΤΗI ΚΑΡΔΙΑ, ΟΤΙ ΑΥΤΟΙ ΤΟΝ ΘΕΟΝ ΟΨΟΝΤΑΙ]
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Joker23 on 29 Aug, 2006, 16:33:38
Thank you!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jaxoncrew on 02 Sep, 2006, 14:43:11
Dear kind sirs
I was wondering if I could have a translation for "No regrets"
thank you for your time
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 02 Sep, 2006, 14:51:27
I was wondering if I could have a translation for "No regrets"

Could we have some context, please? Is it part of a piece of text? Is it a motto? Do you want it in ancient Greek? (Tough to create mottos in a dead language when they are not already there.) Or would modern Greek do the job?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tweeter on 04 Sep, 2006, 02:57:26
Hey all first time poster here! So uh, Hi!
I would like to know if anyone could help me? I want to get the Greek text for Psyche (which I have found hooray) and also Body so really, my question is can anyone help me get the greek for Body, as I cant find it anywehre (apparently I'm inept) thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 04 Sep, 2006, 03:00:13
I assume you have found ΨΥΧΗ (ψυχή) for soul/psyche. The word for body is:

σώμα

ΣΩΜΑ

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: cheese on 05 Sep, 2006, 12:40:36
hello all!
I am also new to this community and was just hoping one of you could be so kind as to help me with a translation.
I see so many people on here needing them for tattoos, and im no different.
all i need is the word "family"
or if there is some better way of interpreting ones parents...that'd be good too.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Πρωτέαs on 05 Sep, 2006, 13:02:12
Οικογένεια
ΟΙΚΟΓΕΝΕΙΑ -> family

Γονείς
ΓΟΝΕΙΣ -> parents
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: cheese on 05 Sep, 2006, 22:32:04
oh wow, thank you so much.
this was my last hope!
thanks again.
Title: dum spiro spero?
Post by: phelan on 05 Sep, 2006, 22:35:27
Hey, loving this forum. I'm adding to my tattoos, and I've always loved "dum spiro spero", something clicks with me anyway. Only thing about it is, I can't seem to find a text style I like. I really love looking at the characters of the greek language and kinda like the idea that it'll be less recognisable - I'm pretty sure thousands of people have dum spiro spero as a tattoo. So i was wondering is it possible to translate it or not really - modern or ancient (preferably ancient)? thanks for any help in advance. cheers!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: F_idάνι on 05 Sep, 2006, 22:56:22
But ''Dum Spiro Spero'' is not greek. It is latin, therefore it will be pronounced differently if written in greek.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: phelan on 05 Sep, 2006, 23:10:42
hey thanks, I know its latin and so the actual wording might be different, but is there a way of phrasing it in greek? i just liked the idea of it not being instantly recognisable to the masses
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 Sep, 2006, 23:11:42
I think phelan wants a translation:

ΟΣΟ ΖΩ, ΕΛΠΙΖΩ

Όσο ζω, ελπίζω.


(While I live, I hope.)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: phelan on 05 Sep, 2006, 23:26:45
thanking you, really really appreciated that, any chance you could do it a picture thingy so i can print it off? plus where do i find the fonts - i followed the link earlier in the forum but i couldn't access them for some reason - it is possible I'm just being a bit dense!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 Sep, 2006, 23:42:07
At the bottom of the message at this link (https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=6949239.msg24826#msg24826), there's a PDF attached which you can download and read with Adobe Reader. Choose a typeface and I'll create a GIF for the upper- or lower-case version of the Greek "Dum spiro spero".
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: phelan on 05 Sep, 2006, 23:48:28
you are undoubtedly a star!!

i really like the garamond bold one? lowercase if thats not too much of a bother. thank you so so much, its just what I was looking for.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Sep, 2006, 00:11:16
Here you are. I've thrown in an extra version in the old system of accents, in case you liked the look of it, but that one is in Palatino as Garamond does not have the full variety. But you get the drift.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tweeter on 06 Sep, 2006, 01:54:12
I assume you have found ΨΥΧΗ (ψυχή) for soul/psyche. The word for body is:

σώμα

ΣΩΜΑ




thank you so much!!! :) I apreciate it the mostest :D :D I'll post pics when it's done
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: veromito on 06 Sep, 2006, 01:56:54
Dear Sirs: I would like to get a tattoo of the name of my sister, Irene.
Irene in Greek means "Peace".
I would like to have it in bold capital letters and in Ancient Greek.
Also, if possibile, I would like to know if you have some particular fonts that i could hand to the tattooer so that he can use them (like a pdf format document or something).
Thank you very much in advance.
GDS
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Sep, 2006, 01:59:36
Veromito, re fonts and PDF, see my message above about this link: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=6949239.msg24826#msg24826

Both 'Irene' and 'peace' are ΕΙΡΗΝΗ in Greek. Thankfully, a word that does not use any specifically Greek characters in upper case.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: veromito on 06 Sep, 2006, 11:20:06
Dear Nickel,

Thank you so much!

To be honest, the fact that the word that does not use any specifically Greek characters in upper case is a kind of a surprise, cos I chose the Greek alphabet for the tattoo also to please the eye.

Maybe this is not the kind of service that you provide, but I would have a question re. the font in ANcient Greek.
I know that ANcient Greek was only in capital letters (I studied Ancient Greek at school). It is true? Would the entire name in lower cases a fake?

Also, what about the accent on the letter "e"?

Best regards,
GDS
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Sep, 2006, 14:15:22
You wouldn't have any accents in the upper-case version. On the other hand, lower case might be fake Ancient Greek, but Ειρήνη is a word that has persisted through time and has been written like that since lower case came into the language. So:

Εἰρήνη
Title: Opening line of the Iliad in Homeric?
Post by: zerattakis on 08 Sep, 2006, 03:05:02
Hi,

I've read all the pages on this topic and I am astounded at the dedication of all the moderators here. You must use much of your leisure time to help all of us less informed and for that I am truly grateful. I am looking to get the opening line of the Iliad tattooed but I have no 'original' translations handy, only english [Pope et. al.] Would anyone help me out? I would like to get the first 4 lines of Pope done but in the original greek. The lines are " Achilles' wrath, to Greece the direful spring of woes unnumber'd, heavely goddess sing! That wrath which hurl'd to Pluto's gloomy reign the souls of mighty chiefs untimely slain;" Another translation is from Perseus "The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes." I'm sure the original is the same however :)Many thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Sep, 2006, 03:31:13
Oh dear, I hate polytonic. But here it is:

Μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος
oὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί’ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε’ ἔθηκε
πολλὰς δ’ ἰφθίμους ψυχὰς Ἄϊδι προΐαψεν ἡρώων

Title: Re: Opening line of the Iliad in Homeric?
Post by: zerattakis on 08 Sep, 2006, 03:42:24
Thank you. Is it possible to have it in capitals also? I'm intersted in how it would look since I'll be printing it off as a key for the tattooist. Is a gif or something easy to make?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Sep, 2006, 03:55:57
ΜΗΝΙΝ ΑΕΙΔΕ ΘΕΑ ΠΗΛΗΪΑΔΕΩ ΑΧΙΛΗΟΣ
ΟΥΛΟΜΕΝΗΝ, Η ΜΥΡΙ’ ΑΧΑΙΟΙΣ ΑΛΓΕ’ ΕΘΗΚΕ
ΠΟΛΛΑΣ Δ’ ΙΦΘΙΜΟΥΣ ΨΥΧΑΣ ΑΪΔΙ ΠΡΟΪΑΨΕΝ ΗΡΩΩΝ


And here's a GIF I think you'll like:
Title: Re: Opening line of the Iliad in Homeric?
Post by: zerattakis on 08 Sep, 2006, 04:02:48
Thank you muchly. I appreciate your help on this. Now to choose a tattooist I trust to get it right. My boss is wondering if it is possible to get 'I am a storm' translated. I know that it probably doesn't exist in any ancient texts obviously but in modern or a best guess ancient translation? Last question I promise :)
Title: Re: Opening line of the Iliad in Homeric?
Post by: banned8 on 08 Sep, 2006, 04:11:51
My boss is wondering if it is possible to get 'I am a storm' translated.

Is your boss a man or a woman?
Title: Re: Opening line of the Iliad in Homeric?
Post by: zerattakis on 08 Sep, 2006, 04:17:34
My boss is wondering if it is possible to get 'I am a storm' translated.

Is your boss a man or a woman?

My apologies. She's is a female.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Sep, 2006, 04:26:42
For a she then:

ΘΥΕΛΛΑ ΕΙΜΙ

or, perhaps, to give it some extra oomph,

ΘΥΕΛΛΑ ΕΙΜΙ ΚΑΙ ΛΑΙΛΑΨ
(I am a storm and a hurricane)

Both words from Homer (but still in use). EIMI is the verb ('I am').
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: zerattakis on 08 Sep, 2006, 04:40:57
For a she then:

ΘΥΕΛΛΑ ΕΙΜΙ

or, perhaps, to give it some extra oomph,

ΘΥΕΛΛΑ ΕΙΜΙ ΚΑΙ ΛΑΙΛΑΨ
(I am a storm and a hurricane)

Both words from Homer (but still in use). EIMI is the verb ('I am').


Many thanks, nickel.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: gaffla226 on 02 Oct, 2006, 04:51:59
I've been searching all over the place, and I think I finally found a place that can help me.  I was wondering if you could give me a good translation for one of Leonidas's quotes during the Battle of Thermopylae:  "Come take them."  Wikipedia has it as "Μολών Λαβέ", but I was hoping I could get another translation from a more reliable source.  Thanks!

Seth
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 02 Oct, 2006, 04:55:53
It is quite accurate.

You will actually find some extra information in these two previous links:

https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=281.0

https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=532.0
Title: Re: Jesus Christ is Lord
Post by: jeverett on 02 Oct, 2006, 22:35:34
Really want a tatoo that says (Jesus Christ is Lord) in Ancient Greek!
I figured someone here could definately help..
Thanks so much!!!

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 03 Oct, 2006, 01:08:55
Κύριος Ιησοῦς Χριστὸς

as in Philippians 2:11 and elsewhere (http://www.google.com/search?num=100&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&rls=GGGL%2CGGGL%3A2006-32%2CGGGL%3Aen&q=%22%CE%BA%CF%85%CF%81%CE%B9%CE%BF%CF%82+%CE%B9%CE%B7%CF%83%CE%BF%CF%85%CF%82+%CF%87%CF%81%CE%B9%CF%83%CF%84%CE%BF%CF%82&btnG=Search).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: zelst000 on 03 Oct, 2006, 17:38:58
Hi there, I would like to know how the word “Arise” is written (also in capitals please too if that’s ok :)

From the online dictionaries I got:

ajnabaivnw
anistemi

I’m looking for the meaning in the following context:
“of those who prepare themselves for a journey/ power and leadership”

Any help much appreciated!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 03 Oct, 2006, 17:49:54
It is the so-called mediopassive form that you are looking for, therefore, in the first person:

ἀνίσταμαι

ΑΝΙΣΤΑΜΑΙ



Garamond GIF attached, as requested.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Panayi on 04 Oct, 2006, 04:26:32
Hi well done on the site i can see that you have helped alot of people.
Now i was hoping that u can help me i play sport and i would like a tattoo of a short Greek saying or quote to do with strength and or commitment or just something that is inspirational. I have tried looking up Greek gods to do with sport but cant find any is there a god that was associated with sport or could u plz tell me a god that represented strength, power or courage that sort off stuff thanks sorry if the question is a bit stupid..
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 04 Oct, 2006, 05:57:53
According to Pindar, a Boeotian poet of the mid-fifth century BC who wrote a lot of poems celebrating athletic victories, the glory of winning a contest comes from Zeus, the king of the gods.  He writes, "What is a somebody?  What is a nobody?  Man is a dream of a shadow.  But when glory, the gift of Zeus, comes, a shining light descends upon humans, and their lives are sweet as honey."  You could adapt his words from this and say, ΑΙΓΛΑ  ΔΙΟΣΔΟΤΟΣ  ΕΛΘΟΙ, "May glory come, the gift of Zeus."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: zelst000 on 04 Oct, 2006, 07:08:32
It is the so-called mediopassive form that you are looking for, therefore, in the first person:

ἀνίσταμαι

ΑΝΙΣΤΑΜΑΙ


Many thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: swinheart on 04 Oct, 2006, 19:29:13
Hi,
I can't believe how helpful you guys are. Its so nice of you to spend so much of your time helping us lot.

I too stumbled onto this page whilst looking for a way to translate something into Ancient Greek for a tattoo. Its a quote by Aristotle and the version I have reads "love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies". I want to get it written in its original form. I have seen lots of different versions as well and I am hoping what I have is OK because the tattoo is in reference to what me and my boyfriend say to eachother not as a friendship quote.

I am having a bit of difficulty finding it and so far I have this which I think says 'one soul dwelling in two bodies'...

μία ψυχὴ δύο σώμασιν ἐνοικοῦσα

...and this for love ( αγάπη ) but I don't know if its even in ancient or modern Greek, and as far as I was aware there were a few different words for love so I don't even know if thats right.

Any help you guys could give me would be really really appreciated and totally make my anniversary!!! :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 04 Oct, 2006, 19:41:42
This is actually by Diogenes Laertius and it is:

(φίλος ἐστὶ) μία ψυχὴ δύο σώμασιν ἐνοικούσα.

(i.e. a friend is one soul inhabiting two bodies).

The Greek text reads:
He was asked, "What is a friend?", and he said, "One soul inhabiting two bodies."

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: houlaboo on 04 Oct, 2006, 22:45:18
Hello everyone.  I just have to say that this is an incredible resourse and I wish I had known about it when I just began to learn Greek.  But now I have a specific question.  I am getting a tattoo probably in the next couple days and I want to make sure that what I've got is absolutely perfect.  As you know, tattoos are more permanent than marriage these days.  I want it to say "love is undying/immortal" in ancient Greek.  This is what I've come up with.
(by the way:  I really like the word αθανατος so that's why I chose it.)

αγάπη αθάνατος

or

αγάπη έστι αθάνατος

Also, could you tell me if all of my accents are correct?  ευχαριστω
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 Oct, 2006, 03:01:13
This is a tough one. Actually, this is one of my arguments concerning machine translation. How does a machine translate "love"? Because we have "eros", i.e. earthly or sexual love, and we have "agape", i.e. Christian love, and charity, and a mother's love for her children.

So you've got to clear that first. And then we have to decide whether it's better to use αθάνατος for immortal or αιώνιος for eternal.

And of course you know that the Greeks went for:

Ἔρως ἀνίκατε μάχαν

(Love, invincible in batlle)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: houlaboo on 05 Oct, 2006, 03:29:35
These are all things I've considered for a while.  I really like the idea of αθανατος in that it refers to the immortal or the undying.  The αγαπη was one that puzzled me as to what I should put because it usually does refer to a Godly or parental love.  But in asking my Greek professor, he didn't seem to raise any issues with it.  My one issue with ερος is that I don't want the idea to be a sexual type of love.  I want it to be the more heart-felt overall idea of love.  My biggest concern with all of this is in the wording of it.  I want it to actually say "love is undying" not "undying love".  So should I put the εστι in there or should I leave it out?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 Oct, 2006, 03:52:24
I like people who know what they want.

Well, Herodotus says:

ἀνθρώπου ψυχὴ ἀθάνατός ἐστι

So, in your case:

ἀγάπη ἀθάνατός ἐστι

There are some people at this site whose ancient Greek is far better than mine, so let's wait and see what they've got to say.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Oct, 2006, 05:11:35
Nickel is right on target.  In fact, you could probably even leave out ἐστι(ν) if you wanted.  As long as the adjective follows the noun, οr precedes the article, ancient Greek can omit the copula.  So ἡ ἀγάπη ἀθάνατος is fine (by analogy with ὁ παῖς καλός).  Or even ἀθάνατος ἡ ἀγάπη

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 Oct, 2006, 12:18:15
Or even ἀθάνατος ἡ ἀγάπη.

I like this, because it's shorter and it does not say "undying love", but "love is undying" even though "is" (ἐστι) is not there.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: houlaboo on 05 Oct, 2006, 17:50:44
Thanks a lot guys, you've been a lot of help.  I think I'm either going with:

η αγαπη αθανατος

or

αθανατος η αγαπη

ευχαριστω
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: swinheart on 06 Oct, 2006, 19:43:46
Hi,
Thanks loads, I'm glad I know the real quote now, before getting something completly wrong done! Cheers :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: houlaboo on 11 Oct, 2006, 02:42:30
Hey, just thought you might like to see this.  I got the tattoo done and it looks great.  Thanks for all the help guys.  I would come back when I get my next ones but I expect them to be in Latin and Coptic.

http://hope.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2011726&id=11400206&l=4263e
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Oct, 2006, 04:02:12
Wow. what a sense of accomplishment it gives to see the work carried out!  I'm sure nickel feels the same way.
We do Latin, too, so come back for that tattoo.  Just be sure to send the photos again!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 11 Oct, 2006, 04:12:42
I'm sure nickel feels the same way.

Indeed! But I'm actually waiting for my Nagiko (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0114134/).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dennishjc on 16 Oct, 2006, 15:01:54
Hello,

I'm looking for the ancient (Plato)translation of this quote..

"Those who are too smart to engage in politics are punished by being governed by those who are dumber."

Can you please help me?


Moderator's note: Question answered here: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=5357.0
Title: The Lord is my Shepherd - Ο Κύριος είναι ο ποιμένας μου
Post by: dhansen on 21 Oct, 2006, 00:29:25
I wanted to get "The Lord is my Shepherd" as a tattoo in greek. Can someone help me with that? I have some greek fonts installed on my computer as well so I could type the letters out once I know what they are.
Title: Re: The Lord is my Shepherd - Translation Help
Post by: Πρωτέαs on 21 Oct, 2006, 00:31:36
Ο Κύριος είναι ο ποιμήν μου
Title: Re: The Lord is my Shepherd
Post by: banned8 on 21 Oct, 2006, 00:40:10
Ο ΚΥΡΙΟΣ ΕΙΝΑΙ Ο ΠΟΙΜΗΝ ΜΟΥ

Ο Κύριος είναι ο ποιμήν μου


In David's Psalm 23:  Κύριος ποιμαίνει με
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: andersonm06 on 25 Oct, 2006, 09:13:29
I'm looking to get a tattoo- could someone please translate:

The sins we often regret are the sins we never commit.

and

Live today, forget the cares of the past.

I would like to compare them before going with one or the other.

Thanks alot!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Oct, 2006, 17:26:09
Here's my shot at the second:

Βίον μὲν τῆσδε τῆς ἡμέρας ζῆν, τὰς δὲ μερίμνας χθιζινὰς λαθέσθαι.

The first is still up for grabs, or I'll give it a try later.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Oct, 2006, 18:08:41
Here's my take on the first one:

Συχνὸν δ' ἡμῑν τὰ μήποτε πραχθέντα μεταμέλει κακά.

Wait a bit;  others may have better suggestions for these two slogans.
And let us know if you need them in capital letters.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: andersonm06 on 27 Oct, 2006, 00:01:21
ive decided i prefer the first one. could you put in in capital letters?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Oct, 2006, 00:09:09
ΣΥΧΝΟΝ  ΔΕ  ΗΜΙΝ ΤΑ  ΜΗΠΟΤΕ  ΠΡΑΧΘΕΝΤΑ  ΜΕΤΑΜΕΛΕΙ  ΚΑΚΑ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: carady on 31 Oct, 2006, 07:19:31
I know you guys must get tired of translating for us idiots who like tattoos. I actually asked a Classics professor at my university, and he refused because he doesn't support or condone tattoos (this highly offended me). But I hope y'all will give me a hand, because I'm not some goofball who's asking you to translate completely wacky stuff. It's quite relevant, at least in my opinion.

I'm looking for "Child of Dionysus" and comedy, tragedy, and satire. (I haven't decided which one I prefer yet)

yes, I'm a theatre kid.

I really appreciate your help, if you will be willing to share your knowledge where others wouldn't.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 31 Oct, 2006, 07:50:27
I actually asked a Classics professor at my university, and he refused because he doesn't support or condone tattoos (this highly offended me).
Yes, I know the type all too well.

Child of Dionysus:  ΔΙΟΝΥΣΟΥ ΠΑΙΣ
Comedy:  ΚΩΜΩΙΔΙΑ
Tragedy:  ΤΡΑΓΩΙΔΙΑ
As for satire, if you mean a satyr-play like Euripides' Bacchae, or the post-classical Greek farces of southern Italy, it's ΣΑΤΥΡΟΣ.  But I should mention that the Greeks didn't do satire as we know it;  that was a Roman specialty.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: carady on 01 Nov, 2006, 11:52:26
ah yes, thanks so much! i believe i'm leaning towards the traditional satyr play, it's always stood out to me as comedy-tragedy-satire as the "holy trinity" of theatre, even if satyr is a far cry from what we think of as satire (the romans definately have rights to that stuff!)

i'd thank you in greek, but all i know is german. oh well, much thanks for sure!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: F_idάνι on 01 Nov, 2006, 13:02:48
I wonder if it would be better to choose ΚΩΜΩΔΙΑ- ΤΡΑΓΩΔΙΑ- ΣΑΤΙΡΑ, but let's see what others might have to say.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 01 Nov, 2006, 15:46:14
By the way, this is in answer to a question posed yesterday concerning the spelling of the ancient Greek words for "tragedy" and "comedy."  Unfortunately, both question and answer were lost in yesterday's cybercataclysm:

The extra iota is the iota subscript, which (in ancient Greek texts) is written above the line in upper case.  Τράγος, "goat" + ΩΙΔΗ (=αοιδή, "song") = "goat song," a recitation in honor of Dionysus;  while the word for "comedy" is based on κώμη, the word for "village"  (Aristotle).
And Aristotle calls the satyr-drama σάτυρος, which is bound to sound funny in modern Greek.
Aristotle's Περί ποιητικής (Poetics) is a wonderful, short work, worth reading by anyone interested in creativity in general, especially in drama and its origins.  And you could follow it up with Borges' short piece, "Averroes' Search."  ;)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: carady on 02 Nov, 2006, 09:17:09
sorry, i don't really follow the last post--there was a cybercataclysm? oh dear. what's the difference between the spellings of these words in the first post vs. the second one?

since i'm having problems deciding, i may take it all in to my artist and ask her what she thinks will fit/look better, in her artistic opinion (which has won awards, hooray!)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Katerina Dimopoulou on 02 Nov, 2006, 10:54:35
Bill's suggestion ΤΡΑΓΩΙΔΙΑ - ΚΩΜΩΙΔΙΑ keeps the ancient greek spelling of tragedy and comedy. ΤΡΑΓΩΔΙΑ - ΚΩΜΩΔΙΑ is the modern greek spelling. As for the satyr play, please note that ΣΑΤΙΡΑ is not a satyr play; as Bill has already noted, it has to do with the Roman genre of satire, which is totally different from the ancient greek satyr play.

To have a clear view of the differences between the two, have a look on the OCD definition of the roman satire
The Oxford Classical Dictionary, 2nd edition, describes Roman satire as “so free and personal that its character changed with each satirist.... a piece of verse, or prose mingled with verse, intended both to entertain, and to improve society by exposing to derision and hatred the follies, vices, and crimes of men. Among its salient characteristics are spontaneity (real or apparent), topicality, ironic wit, coarse humour, colloquial language, frequent intrusions of the author’s personality or persona, and incessant variations of tone and style.”
http://www.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/satiresyllabus.html

while for the satyr play you can have a look here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satyr_play

If you keep the modern greek spelling, ΤΡΑΓΩΔΙΑ - ΚΩΜΩΔΙΑ, you would have to use ΣΑΤΥΡΙΚΟ ΔΡΑΜΑ for the satyr play. I would go for Bill's suggestion, ΤΡΑΓΩΙΔΙΑ - ΚΩΜΩΙΔΙΑ - ΣΑΤΥΡΟΣ - if nothing else, it is shorter.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kg_st on 02 Nov, 2006, 16:03:31
Hi need some help with a translation and ive been looking all over the net=(
could somebody please help me?
This is the  Quote i would like to have translated to ancient greek:

Grief teaches the steadiest minds to waver

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 02 Nov, 2006, 16:48:48
"Grief teaches the steadiest minds to waver":

ΑΜΗΧΑΝΕΙΝ ΤΟ ΚΗΔΟΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΗΝ ΑΣΦΑΛΕΣΤΑΤΟΝ ΦΡΕΝΑ ΔΙΔΑΣΚΕΙ.
Or, lower case:  αμηχανείν το κήδος και την ασφαλέστατον φρένα διδάσκει.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kg_st on 02 Nov, 2006, 18:00:03
Thank you . I really apreciate the help=D
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Colossus on 10 Nov, 2006, 15:31:51
Hi guys.    great work by the way with the site and everything. i just need some help finding  a few words I'm gonna get  tattoo's of.

Ancient Greek   translations and in modern Greek   if can be  done.

Colossus

Hellbound

Wargod

I'm just hoping u can help me.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 10 Nov, 2006, 16:42:54
Colossus =  Κολοσσός

Wargod = Θεὸς τοῦ πολέμου


Good for both ancient and modern Greek.

Can't think of an appropriate phrase for "Hellbound" yet.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Colossus on 11 Nov, 2006, 09:44:08
Ahh thank you so much.

ill be  checking in  day to day.  hoping you guys can find   a translation  for "hellbound"

Thanks for the help
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: timaaustin on 12 Nov, 2006, 21:51:57
Nickle,

I am a bible college student that has taken two semesters of greek. I am not very good but i was wondering if you could give me a translation for a couple of easy words. I am thinking of getting a tattoo of one of them and i want to make sure i have them right. the words are...

bondservant
servant
grace
blood alone

thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: shagrathi on 12 Nov, 2006, 22:33:06
bond= γραμμάτιο ή ομολογία
servant= υπηρέτης
grace= γοητεία
blood alone= αίμα μόνος, I don't know where did you see this expression, but I don't think that there is an accurate translation is Greek for this one. If you translate is straight as you see it, it doen't make any sense.

I would reccomend you to have a tattoo of "grace" it's the best of these, the rest are just words, that I don't think will relate with something if you make tattoo of them.

You said that you took 2 semesters of Greek. Are you studying in the U.S.? Are you in a college, or in a Community College?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 12 Nov, 2006, 22:58:40
Within the religious / biblical context:

bondservant = (this one is a slave girl in English, so in Greek) δούλη

servant = υπηρέτης, feminine υπηρέτις

grace = χάρις

blood alone = μόνον το αίμα (but I'm not sure I know what you mean, I'd love to have an idea of the context in which you see this)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: shagrathi on 12 Nov, 2006, 23:08:44
Για το bondservant δεν ήξερα αυτό τον ορισμό, για το blood alone και εγώ δεν νομίζω να εννοεί αυτό, μάλλον θα μπερδεύεται με κάτι άλλο.
Title: Passion
Post by: InHocSignoVinces on 14 Nov, 2006, 22:49:08
I really appreciate what you all are doing here. it is amazing. i read all the pages in this forum just now. I am looking for the word passion. What I really would like is the Biblical meaning of the word, but not as in "passion of christ" more like passion for life, or being passionate about God. If you all could help me with this I would appreciate it very much.

Also, I know this is a translation forum, but some of you seem very well versed in many things particularily historical value of literature. I was wondering if someone could tell me the significance (if there is any) of the symbol IHS (IHC). It is a symbol for Jesus, being the first three letters iota, eta, sigma, of the name Jesus, from my understanding, but I was just wondering if it ever played any kind of significant role.

In Hoc
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 14 Nov, 2006, 22:59:20
Quick answer to the second question:

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uibk.ac.at%2Fsprachen-literaturen%2Ftyrolis-latina%2Fbilder%2Fihs1.gif&hash=a648b5cdbb432e891c3f96b54d5aadceae311eeb)

IHS. A monogram for the name Jesus, formed by abbreviating the corresponding Greek word which in uncials is written IHΣOYΣ. It is found, e.g., in the Latin text of Lk. 6:3 in the Codex Bezae. That the second symbol, H, was really a Greek η and not a Latin h was soon forgotten, and the abbreviation 'ihs' was thus often wrongly expanded to 'Ihesus'.

Other attempts to explain the three letters as initials of separate words became very common. Thus they were held to denote Iesus Hominum Salvator ('Jesus, Saviour of Men') or In Hoc Signo [vinces] ('in this sign [thou shalt conquer]'). In the Middle Ages the IHS was widely used among the Franciscans and later it became popular among the Jesuits, who sometimes interpreted it as Jesum Habemus Socium ('We have Jesus as our companion').

From F.L. Cross and E.A. Livingstone, eds., The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (1997).

And I don't think it ever played a very significant role, or they wouldn't have been coming up with new explanations all the time.

See also http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07649a.htm
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Nov, 2006, 00:47:03
On the first question, ancient Greeks did not have anything equivalent to our all-encompassing "passion;"  instead, they preferred to name distinct aspects of what we call passion:  yearning (ΠΟΘΟΣ), desire (ΕΠΙΘΥΜΙΑ), affection (ΣΤΟΡΓΗ), emotional affect (ΠΑΘΟΣ), vehemence (ΣΦΟΔΡΟΤΗΣ). love (ΑΓΑΠΗ), sexual love (ΕΡΩΣ), eagerness (ΠΡΟΘΥΜΙΑ), etc.  One, or a number of these, may suit your needs.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Katerina Dimopoulou on 15 Nov, 2006, 10:03:09
Hi need some help with a translation and ive been looking all over the net=(
could somebody please help me?
This is the  Quote i would like to have translated to ancient greek:

Grief teaches the steadiest minds to waver



With all due respect to Bill and his otherwise flawless suggestion, I have to say that the line comes from Sophocles' Antigone (see http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Sophocles).

                               οὐδ' ὃς ἂν βλάστῃ μένει
       νοῦς τοῖς κακῶς πράσσουσιν, ἀλλ' ἐξίσταται. (563-64)

or, upper case

                              ΟΥΔ' ΟΣ ΑΝ ΒΛΑΣΤΗΙ ΜΕΝΕΙ
      ΝΟΥΣ ΤΟΙΣ ΚΑΚΩΣ ΠΡΑΣΣΟΥΣΙΝ, ΑΛΛ' ΕΞΙΣΤΑΤΑΙ.

Can't really say if this can be used for a tattoo; it seems far too long and complicated, as opposed to the english translation.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Nov, 2006, 18:26:27
Excellent work, Katerina!  Yes, the line cited by Kg_st is obviously a well-adapted translation of Sophocles' verses, which literally mean something like "For those who meet misfortune, no healthy mind remains steadfast; instead, the mind is taken aback."  Without your sharp eye and dedicated research, we would probably never have been able to discover the original source!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kaybee on 15 Nov, 2006, 20:23:18
Hi Everyone...

I'm new to this forum, and I think what you're doing is great!  Here's my story:

I spend three years stationed on Crete while in the Air Force.  While there, I married,lived in the town of Gournes and my son was born at the hospital in Iraklion.  That was many years ago...my son is now 18 yrs old (and just enlisted in the AF). I feel like my life has now come full circle..and looking back, I realize that the time that I spent there has a profoundly postive impact on my life.  I met so many wonderful people, saw so many beautiful places....It's a time I will never forget. 
"Love is the source of life" is the phrase I want to use...but I want it in Greek as a reminder of that time in my life.  Since I'm female, I'd like to have it in a font that's a softer visually (does this make sense?) If I could see it in a few different fonts I'd really appreciate it.  Thanks a lot.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 15 Nov, 2006, 22:17:47
Hi, Kay.

I was born and raised in Iraklion, and spent many many hours listening to music from the Gournes station. I probably owe a lot of my English to trying to understand what the broadcasters were saying. Even my knowledge of rock music comes from that station. But that was before 1966, long before your time there.

Love is the source of life, then. In Greek, it is better to say "The source of life is love". Here it is in a font that I like.

Πηγή της ζωής είναι η αγάπη.

Attached here you will find a PDF which you can download and read with Adobe Reader. Choose a typeface and I'll create a GIF for your favourite font.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kaybee on 15 Nov, 2006, 22:21:14
Yes...that's absolutely beautiful...Thank you so very much!!  --Kay
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kaybee on 15 Nov, 2006, 22:26:23
I couldn't get to the link...I actually like the one you have here (the italics is cool).  Can you sen me that one please?..and maybe one other one?  thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 15 Nov, 2006, 22:47:40
A recent crash must have wrought havoc with the links, so I reuploaded the PDF.

But here are some suggestions in any case.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kaybee on 15 Nov, 2006, 23:07:44
Perfect!!  Thanks again!
Title: In God I Trust
Post by: liltexas01 on 20 Nov, 2006, 06:09:26
Howdy all, I am new to the forum. My mom was born and raised in Greece. I am going to get a tattoo to be a symbol of my heritage. I was wanting to get this tattoed along with a few other things that i am drawing up. If yall have any ideas about what else might be a good idea that will look good i would appreciate it. Thank You.
Title: Re: In God I Trust
Post by: billberg23 on 20 Nov, 2006, 12:45:50
Modern Greek:  ΕΧΩ ΠΙΣΤΗ ΣΤΟ ΘΕΟ  (Έχω πίστη στο θεό)
Ancient (Biblical) Greek:  ΕΙΣ ΤΟΝ ΘΕΟΝ ΠΙΣΤΕΥΩ  (Εἰς τὸν θεὸν πιστεύω)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Teryn on 21 Nov, 2006, 10:01:41
Hi there. You guys are doing such a great job, and the advice is so valuable. Having something tattooed onto your body that means something completely different to what you intended would not be pleasant. ;)

I'm hoping that someone could translate the infinitive for, endure/to endure. I'm hoping that my tattoo will remind myself that when I'm down I have the strength to pick myself up again. I know it sounds kind of cheesy but I'd like the word to reflect inspiration, strength and slight aggression.

I'm also curious to what the Ancient Greek word for 'Dragon' would look like, and would it represent more of a serpent?

I would love to see some different fonts, and I'm keen on lower case.

Thankyou :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Katerina Dimopoulou on 21 Nov, 2006, 11:51:03
Τλῆναι would be the infinitive for 'endure'. Τλῆθι as well as τέτλαθι, the imperative (second singular).

And δράκων would be the word for dragon. Have a look here.

http://www.theoi.com/Cat_Drakones.html
http://www.theoi.com/Ther/DrakonHesperios.html

Have a good day :-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Teryn on 22 Nov, 2006, 09:11:03
Thankyou so much Katerina, for the translation and the links, it was as I thought reguarding dragons.


Thanks again :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kaybee on 22 Nov, 2006, 20:03:17
Hi Nickel!!

I have a question that may sound silly, but please bear with me:

You helped me out a bunch with translating this:  Πηγή της ζωής είναι η αγάπη.

I would like to know how to say it....can you (or anyone else in the forum) help me by spelling it out with the proper inflections so that I say it correctly?  It's been a long time since I've actually said anything in Greek...and even when I did, it wasn't very good.

Thanks for your patience.

Kay

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 22 Nov, 2006, 20:24:14
Πηγή της ζωής είναι η αγάπη.

I would like to know how to say it....

Not an easy one, with two different gammas in there. So let's start on those first:

There's the soft gamma sound when "γ" comes before an i or an e sound. Then it is pronounced like "y" in yield or yes.

And there's the hard gamma sound when the "γ" comes before an a or o sound, and that's like the French "r", much deeper in the throat.

So this would be: Pi-YEE ti(s) zo-EES in i a-ΓA-pi

I've gone for elision in "είναι η" (in case readers wonder).

Upper case shows where the accent falls. And the "i" sound is pretty much the same, whether accented EE or unaccented /i/.

"tis zoEEs" sounds like "ti-zo-EEs" unless you make a purposeful pause.

The 'o' as in 'cot' and the 'a' as in 'cut'.

Let me know if this is clear enough.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kidd on 22 Nov, 2006, 21:45:01
 Hello and we all appreciate the time and effort you put into this site.

I need a little help with a few phrases:
1)  Always in my heart
2) In loving memory

Its for my yia yia so any other suggestions would be nice. I would also like upper and lower case letters in what ever font or style usually used on gravestones.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: damnthing on 23 Nov, 2006, 02:19:33
Greetings:

I'm struggling with getting my head around a homeric greek guide, and would appreciate help with translating the word:

"survive"

and yes, this is intended for a tattoo.  I've got a Liddell & Harts, but I'm floundering here.  Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Nov, 2006, 05:44:52
Here are two Homeric words that cover aspects of what I think you mean by "survive:"

ΑΝΤΕΧΕΥ   means "hold out!"

ΖΗΘΙ   means "live on!"
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Teryn on 23 Nov, 2006, 09:05:13
Hi guys, just wondering if anyone has any font varieties for Τλῆθι / τέτλαθι 'endure!'

Thanks again :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kaybee on 24 Nov, 2006, 16:07:41
Great Nickel...

I think I've got it.  Thank you so much!!

Happy Holidays!

Kay
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Nov, 2006, 23:39:27
Hello and we all appreciate the time and effort you put into this site.

I need a little help with a few phrases:
1)  Always in my heart
2) In loving memory

Its for my yia yia so any other suggestions would be nice. I would also like upper and lower case letters in what ever font or style usually used on gravestones.
We're a little unsure just what to suggest.  On the one hand, you've posted in the "Tattoos and ancient Greek" section;  but if, on the other hand, you want the inscription for your grandmother's gravestone, then it wouldn't be a tattoo and you may want modern, not ancient, Greek.  Please clarify.

P.S.  Let us know who "we all" are, so we can appreciate you, too! 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 26 Nov, 2006, 03:12:11
1) Always in my heart
2) In loving memory

Sorry, it seems we missed this one. Forget the ancient Greek. Here's things we say on these occasions:

1.
ΘΑ ΖΕΙΣ ΠΑΝΤΑ ΣΤΗΝ ΚΑΡΔΙΑ ΜΟΥ

(You'll always live in my heart.)

2.
ΑΦΙΕΡΩΜΕΝΟ ΣΤΗ ΜΝΗΜΗ ΤΗΣ

(Dedicated to her memory.)

Stick to upper case and Times New Roman is the typeface most people use.
Let us know if you'd like variations of the above. And condolences on behalf of the team.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kidd on 27 Nov, 2006, 19:08:16
 Sorry for the confusion this is for a tattoo and nickel those will work.Unless knowing its for a tattoo brings any other suggetions to mind.Maybe with less letters or words.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Nov, 2006, 19:25:45
You can go for the shorter forms:

ΠΑΝΤΑ ΣΤΗΝ ΚΑΡΔΙΑ ΜΟΥ

(ALWAYS IN MY HEART)

ΣΤΗ ΜΝΗΜΗ ΤΗΣ

(IN MEMORIAM; IN HER MEMORY)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kidd on 27 Nov, 2006, 19:38:07
    Thanks nickel.      How would those look in lower case letters?   
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Nov, 2006, 19:44:59
Πάντα στην καρδιά μου.

Στη μνήμη της.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kidd on 27 Nov, 2006, 19:56:28
Thanks nickel.  Have a good day.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ydnim on 27 Nov, 2006, 20:03:41
Hi...

I would just like to know the translation for the name- Mindy

Thanks Alot!

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ydnim on 27 Nov, 2006, 20:05:46
and sorry but to add... how about the numbers - 271084  ??

thanks a million =)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Katerina Dimopoulou on 27 Nov, 2006, 22:08:56
Your numbers:

2 – δύο
7 – επτά / εφτά
1 – ένα
0 – μηδέν
8 – οκτώ / οχτώ
4 – τέσσερα

Note, though, that when used as adjectives, the numerals 1 and 4 are inflective, changing form according to gender. Thus, we have ένας (male), μία (female), ένα (neutral) and τέσσερις (m/f), τέσσερα (n).

As for ‘Mindy’, do you want a translation or a transliteration? For I don’t think there is a greek translation for it (but then, maybe I am wrong).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ydnim on 28 Nov, 2006, 13:40:47
thanks for the numbers!

as for the name - Mindy... i just needed a direct translation ... just like any other translation for names...

=)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ydnim on 28 Nov, 2006, 13:46:02
and i think i mean transliteration.... haha...

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Katerina Dimopoulou on 28 Nov, 2006, 13:58:13
Μίντι for Mindy, then.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ydnim on 28 Nov, 2006, 14:00:43
Thanks alot!
really appreciate your help =)
Title: Re: I will touch the sun or I will die trying.
Post by: ocelot on 28 Nov, 2006, 21:21:14
This is for a tattoo. I am looking for a translation of a quotation attributed to Icarus:

"I will touch the sun or I will die trying," which I am told, is the full quoatation but because of space limitations

and in the alternate, just a translation of:

"I will die trying."

Thanks.
Title: Re: I will touch the sun or I will die trying.
Post by: billberg23 on 28 Nov, 2006, 23:48:23
I will die trying = ΕΠΙΧΕΙΡΩΝ  ΑΠΟΛΟΥΜΑΙ

In lower case: ἐπιχειρῶν ἀπολοῦμαι

i'm wondering if the quotation attributed to Icarus is really by an ancient Greek author — it sounds rather modern.
Title: Re: I will touch the sun or I will die trying.
Post by: ocelot on 29 Nov, 2006, 08:52:45
Thanks for the translation. Is there any way you can post as a pdf or gif mpeg so that I can copy it an enlarge it? Thanks.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: damnthing on 29 Nov, 2006, 18:34:26
Here are two Homeric words that cover aspects of what I think you mean by "survive:"

ΑΝΤΕΧΕΥ   means "hold out!"

ΖΗΘΙ   means "live on!"

Hey, thanks so much!  Could I get the break down, too?  Is this just the form of the verb, and if so, what case, etc.?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Nov, 2006, 19:09:17
Hey, thanks so much!  Could I get the break down, too?  Is this just the form of the verb, and if so, what case, etc.?
ΑΝΤΕΧΕΥ  is 2nd person singular mediopassive present progressive imperative, literally "keep holding out!"
ΖΗΘΙ   is second person singular active aorist (snapshot action) imperative.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ydnim on 29 Nov, 2006, 21:16:05
Μίντι for Mindy

can i know how the lower case for Μίντι ??

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 29 Nov, 2006, 21:21:44
Μίντι for Mindy

can i know how the lower case for Μίντι ??

What do you mean?  Μίντι is the lower case exactly as "Mindy". The upper case would be ΜΙΝΤΙ.:-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ydnim on 29 Nov, 2006, 21:24:10
ok. got it.

how about the lower case for m  instead of M ? is it still the same?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 29 Nov, 2006, 21:31:51
ok. got it.

how about the lower case for m  instead of M ? is it still the same?

No, it is not the same. This will be μίντι but, in Greek, it makes no sense to start a name with a letter in the lower case.
Title: No Regrets
Post by: ilovenyca on 29 Nov, 2006, 22:45:44
I want to get a tattoo on my inner wrist that says 'No Regrets' in greek to honor the greek side of my family.

Does anyone know how to write that? Ancient or Modern greek, whichever will look better.

Any suggestions?
Title: Re: No regrets
Post by: billberg23 on 30 Nov, 2006, 00:59:10
I want to get a tattoo on my inner wrist that says 'No Regrets' in greek to honor the greek side of my family.

Does anyone know how to write that? Ancient or Modern greek, whichever will look better.

Any suggestions?

Ancient Greek would be Οὔ μοι μεταμέλει  οὐδενός or in upper case ΟΥ ΜΟΙ ΜΕΤΑΜΕΛΕΙ ΟΥΔΕΝΟΣ.
Modern Greek is probably simpler, so let's wait for that.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 30 Nov, 2006, 01:03:49
I want to get a tattoo on my inner wrist that says 'No Regrets' in greek to honor the greek side of my family.

Does anyone know how to write that? Ancient or Modern greek, whichever will look better.

Any suggestions?

Modern Greek would be: Δεν μετανιώνω για τίποτα (upper case: ΔΕΝ ΜΕΤΑΝΙΩΝΩ ΓΙΑ ΤΙΠΟΤΑ).
Title: Translation - 'beautiful girls'
Post by: Tyson2122 on 30 Nov, 2006, 03:43:25
Hi sorry not even sure whether this is the right section to post this but .... i wanted to name a star after my wife and daughter rebecca and ellie .... for christmas

regards tyson
Title: Re: Translation - 'beautiful girls'
Post by: Evmorfia on 30 Nov, 2006, 09:51:32
Hi sorry not even sure whether this is the right section to post this but .... i wanted to name a star after my wife and daughter rebecca and ellie .... for christmas

regards tyson

Hi tyson,

Beutiful girls is "Όμορφα Κορίτσια"

Good luck with your star and have a nice Christmass
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: v for vompirellah on 30 Nov, 2006, 09:54:28
hello to everyone!

If there is any possibility to name stars after our names... I kindly ask you to get me the provider's name in order to send them my request. Ok Sir Nickel?
Title: Re: pearl
Post by: Christy on 30 Nov, 2006, 12:25:52
Hi there.  I am looking for a translation of "pearl" for a tattoo.  I am Greek and have gone through alot so far in my life and the way a pearl is created has given the word a very personal and important meaning in my life, so I wanted to ask help from those I thought would know for sure. If possible I would really like this in Ancient and Modern Greek and in several fonts (if you can??), probably lower case. Thanks for your help in advance  :)
Title: Re: pearl
Post by: wings on 30 Nov, 2006, 12:29:52
Hi there.  I am looking for a translation of "pearl" for a tattoo.  I am Greek and have gone through alot so far in my life and the way a pearl is created has given the word a very personal and important meaning in my life, so I wanted to ask help from those I thought would know for sure. If possible I would really like this in Ancient and Modern Greek and in several fonts (if you can??), probably lower case. Thanks for your help in advance  :)

Ancient Greek:  μάργαρον
Modern Greek:  μαργαριτάρι
Title: Re: Vasdakis, Basdakis
Post by: rockerbug13 on 30 Nov, 2006, 13:34:50
My grandmother's father came to the United States through Ellis Island years ago.  His name was Vasdakis... they changed it to Basdakis.  Anyway I've wanted to change my name back to our original name for years.  i would like to know how to write it.  either way...  i also want to get it as a tattoo eventually

Thank you for your help :P
Title: Re: Vasdakis, Basdakis
Post by: wings on 30 Nov, 2006, 13:37:28
My grandmother's father came to the United States through Ellis Island years ago.  His name was Vasdakis... they changed it to Basdakis.  Anyway I've wanted to change my name back to our original name for years.  i would like to know how to write it.  either way...  i also want to get it as a tattoo eventually

Thank you for your help :P

Hi, there.

The name would be Βασδάκης in Greek.
Title: Re: pearl
Post by: Christy on 30 Nov, 2006, 21:40:06
Ancient Greek:  μάργαρον
Modern Greek:  μαργαριτάρι


Thanks so much!  :)
Title: Re: pearl
Post by: Christy on 30 Nov, 2006, 22:11:03
One more question for you.  Is it proper to have μάργαρον spelled out vertically?  Or does that in any way change the word/meaning?  Thanks :)
Title: Re: pearl
Post by: wings on 30 Nov, 2006, 22:24:45
One more question for you.  Is it proper to have μάργαρον spelled out vertically?  Or does that in any way change the word/meaning?  Thanks :)

You can have it vertically. Nothing changes.:-)
Title: Re: pearl
Post by: Christy on 01 Dec, 2006, 22:03:13
One last question, I promise!!  How do you pronounce μάργαρον??  Thanks so much for your help, wings!!
Title: Re: pearl
Post by: wings on 01 Dec, 2006, 22:37:42
It is pronounced /'maryaron/ ("y" about the same as in "yes").
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 01 Dec, 2006, 22:49:44
It's actually a bit more complicated than that. It's not the soft gamma sound of 'yes' but more like the sound of the French 'r', deeper in the throat.
Title: άγια and holy
Post by: roguecat87 on 04 Dec, 2006, 05:11:22
Hello there,

What an amazing site! I came across it whilst browsing and I am in awe of the patience and tact shown by all the moderators.

My name is Catherine, a name which apparantly originates from from the Greek for 'pure'. I am facinated by the culture and history of Greece, and have recently began Homer's The Oddessey. I want to get a tattoo that says 'holy' - the word the internet throws up at me is άγια. Could I ask, firstly, is this the correct word, secondly, could I possibly see it in other fonts, and thirdly, is άγια a noun, or an adjective that would describe an object, a person, or a god? Does it mean literally sacred/pure or does it mean in service to the gods?

I specifically want the word that means sacred or set apart for God's purposes, and would love it in the Greek that was used in the New Testament.

Many thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: uhohjanelio on 04 Dec, 2006, 18:04:27
Hi There,

My best friend has been wanting to get a tattoo of the meaning of his son's name -- Alexander -- for quite some time but has been unsuccessful finding a translation into Ancient Greek, I am hoping that you can help! :-) The phrase that we are looking to get translated is "Protector of Mankind".

I am hoping you can help! Thanks a million, this will mean the world to him!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 04 Dec, 2006, 18:40:28
You may be pleased to learn that the name "Alexander" already means "Protector of Men."  In Greek, the name is written ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: uhohjanelio on 04 Dec, 2006, 19:31:18
WOW! Thank you for the quick response! :-) But I think he was looking to have the actual words "Protector of Men" translated, not just the name -- is there a difference?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 04 Dec, 2006, 19:40:12
The name "Alexander" means "protector of men" in Greek. So you can just explain this to your friend. It would make no sense in Greek to repeat the same thing twice saying "Alexander, protector of men". You just say "ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ" ("Αλέξανδρος" in the lower case) and this is more than enough.:-)
Title: Re: άγια and holy
Post by: banned8 on 04 Dec, 2006, 20:27:02
I specifically want the word that means sacred or set apart for God's purposes, and would love it in the Greek that was used in the New Testament.

There are two words to look at here:

ἅγιος and ἱερός

They are both adjectives that have uses as nouns. They are both very old—the latter since Homer's time and the former since Herodotus'— and both appear in the Bible.

ἅγιος (the first bit in hagiography) is the word for saintly and saint. It is also the word we use in Holy Land (Άγιοι Τόποι), the Holy See (η Αγία Έδρα), the Holy Trinity (η Αγία Τριάδα) et al. Saint Paul is άγιος Παύλος and the Saint (viz. Roger Moore) is ο Άγιος.

ἱερός (the first bit in hieroglyph) is the word for sacred, such as a sacred place; and the noun, το ιερόν, is the sanctuary and the sanctum (but the holy of holies corresponds to τα άγια των αγίων). The Holy Alliance is Ιερά Συμμαχία, a holy war is ιερός πόλεμος, the Holy Synod is Ιερά Σύνοδος.

If you're going to use either of these words as a tatoo, I would choose the neuter form:

ἅγιον or ἱερόν

The former would mean saintly and pure (as in "never been touched"); the latter, sacred, devoted and inviolable (as in "not to be touched").

WARNING: the triangular bone at the base of the spine that joins to a hip bone on either side and forms part of the pelvis, the sacrum, is ιερόν οστούν in Greek. If you're going to have a tatoo there, ἱερόν would be appropriate.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: uhohjanelio on 04 Dec, 2006, 21:22:25
The name "Alexander" means "protector of men" in Greek. So you can just explain this to your friend. It would make no sense in Greek to repeat the same thing twice saying "Alexander, protector of men". You just say "ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ" ("Αλέξανδρος" in the lower case) and this is more than enough.:-)

Thank you so much! :-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Rossi on 05 Dec, 2006, 02:50:58
Good day everybody! I am amazed at the dedication of everyone here. And you even do it for free! Like many others, I came to this site for a translation. If you are not busy, may you provide me with word ARKHE written in greek? It means "beginning," right? And if it's not too much to ask, can someone make me a gif with that word in both upper and lower case, and in different font types? If you can't, I'll just take what you'll give me. Thanks so much in advance! More power to this site! :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 05 Dec, 2006, 02:56:34
Good day everybody! I am amazed at the dedication of everyone here. And you even do it for free! Like many others, I came to this site for a translation. If you are not busy, may you provide me with word ARKHE written in greek? It means "beginning," right? And if it's not too much to ask, can someone make me a gif with that word in both upper and lower case, and in different font types? If you can't, I'll just take what you'll give me. Thanks so much in advance! More power to this site! :)

Hi, there.

In the upper case you have exactlly the same characters in English as the word is ΑΡΧΗ. Lower case is αρχή. Let us know if you still want the lower case so that we make a gif for you.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Rossi on 05 Dec, 2006, 03:05:47
Hi, there.

In the upper case you have exactlly the same characters in English as the word is ΑΡΧΗ. Lower case is αρχή. Let us know if you still want the lower case so that we make a gif for you.

Wow that's fast! I think I'll take the lower case. If I get the upper case I might get tired of people asking me what those letters stand for. Haha. Thank you very much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 Dec, 2006, 03:45:29
For a start, here's a GIF.

Because I think it would be fascinating to tell people that ay-pee-eks-eitch means 'beginning' in Greek, I've thrown in one in upper case as well.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: roguecat87 on 05 Dec, 2006, 08:37:08
Wow nickel! Thankyou so much for your through offering. Roger Moore the saint! I'm a Sean Connery girl myself...
Would I be amiss to ask for the second word, ἱερόν, in some different fonts? Funnily enough the tattoo is going to be on my lower back.
Thank you a million times!
P.S I like your photo. It's very pensive, it reminds me of Auguste Rodin's Thinker Statue.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Rossi on 05 Dec, 2006, 15:05:40
For a start, here's a GIF.

Because I think it would be fascinating to tell people that ay-pee-eks-eitch means 'beginning' in Greek, I've thrown in one in upper case as well.

Thank you very much nickel! You are the man.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 Dec, 2006, 20:55:00
ἱερόν, in some different fonts
Title: I love you, Mommy
Post by: Marianthe on 05 Dec, 2006, 21:03:37
Good morning, I was hoping for a little assistance if possible.
My mother passed away 3 years ago and I have been considering a tattoo in her honor for some time.
My parents were both Greek but my father wanted us to be American so we were never taught the language. My mother loved it so and I think it always hurt her that we never learned. (She had deep pride, our great grandfather was an important figure in the Greek revolutionary war and it galled her for us to be so American)
My wish to commemorate her, is to write “I love you Mommy” in Modern Greek.
I was given a translation but I think what it actually said was Malaka (great joke – not so funny to have over your heart for eternity.) Can someone please help me? I would deeply appreciate it.

Thank you for your time.
Title: Re: I love you Mommy
Post by: wings on 05 Dec, 2006, 21:09:51
Σ' αγαπώ, μαμά!

or

Σ' αγαπώ, μανούλα! (as already suggested by Sassa in http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1669590)
Title: Re: I love you, Mommy
Post by: Marianthe on 05 Dec, 2006, 21:13:26
Thank you very much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: marian m on 05 Dec, 2006, 21:56:18
Hi Marianthe,

I had to say hello because we happen to have the same name in Greek! :-) You know, it's not a very common name.

btw: what state are you from?



Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Jambo09 on 06 Dec, 2006, 00:01:27
Hi,

I actually have the same request except mine is a bit more complex. My Mother passed away 2 years ago and i want something to commemorate to her but i cannot think of anything specific that would be good.

Any suggestions along with the translation in any Greek u think looks best would be most helpful!

Thanks
Jambo
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Jambo09 on 06 Dec, 2006, 03:20:17
Could u translate for me...

'to a mother who was most brave and fair'

I think that is what i might want but just have to be sure.

Thankyou
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Dec, 2006, 16:20:28
Could u translate for me...
'to a mother who was most brave and fair'

My thought for this goes like this:

σε μια μητέρα δίκαιη και γενναία

(word for word: to a mother fair and brave)

In Greek, this is more pithy and has better rhythm.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 06 Dec, 2006, 16:23:24
Nick, how about σε μια μητέρα γενναία και ωραία?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Dec, 2006, 16:30:06
Nick, how about σε μια μητέρα γενναία και ωραία?

Well, explain the difference and let the asker choose.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 06 Dec, 2006, 16:33:35
Well, σε μια μητέρα γενναία και ωραία means "to a brave and fair mother ("fair" as in the title of the film "My fair lady").:-)

Sorry, Nick, I can't think of a better explanation.:-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Dec, 2006, 16:43:14
"to a brave and fair mother" ("fair" as in the title of the film "My fair lady").:-)

As opposed to a reasonable and impartial mother, which was my interpretation with "δίκαιη" — to make this a more complete explanation.

(Thanks, my fair co-moderator.)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Jambo09 on 06 Dec, 2006, 16:51:40
I think im going to go with Nickels, he got the right meaning but both is actually a great way to look at it!!

Is there any chance you can make a jpeg for me please as i dont have the tools to get the font on this computer,

Thankyou very much for your time both of you!!!

Jambo
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Dec, 2006, 17:26:15
I hope you agree with my choice of typeface.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kidd on 07 Dec, 2006, 19:07:52
Hello, You helped me out a little while ago and now i hope you can help out a friend of mine. We need the phrase "Gods Angels"  in upper and lower case letters. Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 07 Dec, 2006, 21:04:20
God's Angels


ΑΓΓΕΛΟΙ  ΤΟΥ  ΘΕΟΥ

ἄγγελοι  τοῦ  Θεοῦ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tabro on 08 Dec, 2006, 04:44:00
Hello all.  This is one of the most interesting threads I've ever seen.  I love this stuff!

I was wondering if I might be able to get something translated.  Can you translate "Life is pain"?  A few pages back (about 20), Nickel had translated "Eternal Love", and I think the font he used was fantastic.  Would it be possible to see my translation in that font?

Thanks in advance,

Tab
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Dec, 2006, 05:10:33
Quote
Life is pain

I'll give you my version in modern Greek first, and let me know if this is the right typeface. But wait for others to contribute their ideas as well. In modern Greek this is slogan-like and means "Life equals pain".

Ζωή ίσον οδύνη.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tabro on 08 Dec, 2006, 05:19:52
I'll give you my version in modern Greek first, and let me know if this is the right typeface. But wait for others to contribute their ideas as well. In modern Greek this is slogan-like and means "Life equals pain".

Ζωή ίσον οδύνη.

Wow, that's very interesting looking indeed.  Thank you for replying so quickly.  Do you have any fonts that use the more "blockier" typeface?  By blockier I mean more straight lines.  Kind of like what is carved below the statue at Thermopylae?  I'm referring to "Molon Labe".

Thanks,

Tab
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Dec, 2006, 05:23:35
Do you mean like this?

Ζωή ίσον οδύνη.

Or upper case:

ΖΩΗ ΙΣΟΝ ΟΔΥΝΗ.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tabro on 08 Dec, 2006, 05:27:44
Do you mean like this?

Ζωή ίσον οδύνη.

Or upper case:

ΖΩΗ ΙΣΟΝ ΟΔΥΝΗ.

Actually, the font you used on Page 2 for "Η ΤΑΝ" "Η ΕΠΙ ΤΑΣ" looks pretty close to what I'm thinking.  Could you try that?

Thanks,

Tab
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Dec, 2006, 05:35:17
Thought so. My favourite. Lithos. Only it comes as a JPG.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tabro on 08 Dec, 2006, 05:39:29
Thought so. My favourite. Lithos. Only it comes as a JPG.

That's what I was thinking.  Fantastic font!  I will have to wait and see what the others come up with, but the first font you showed me, and this Lithos both look great.  Does Lithos use only capitals by the way?

Thanks so much,

Tab
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Dec, 2006, 05:40:17
Ζωή ίσον οδύνη.

I can't think of anything more beautiful in ancient Greek.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Dec, 2006, 05:43:23
Does Lithos use only capitals by the way?

Yes, it imitates ancient Greek writing, when only upper case characters were in use.

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimagesource.allposters.com%2Fimages%2Fpic%2FBRGPOD%2F225216%7EVotive-Tablet-with-Relief-of-a-Leg-Dedicated-by-Tyche-to-Aesculapius-and-Hygieia-Posters.jpg&hash=af91df2bd9eac3d5f8a420a285f37d60d91507e6)

(Thanks, Bill.)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tabro on 08 Dec, 2006, 05:47:06
Yes, it imitates ancient Greek writing, when only upper case characters were in use.

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimagesource.allposters.com%2Fimages%2Fpic%2FBRGPOD%2F225216%7EVotive-Tablet-with-Relief-of-a-Leg-Dedicated-by-Tyche-to-Aesculapius-and-Hygieia-Posters.jpg&hash=af91df2bd9eac3d5f8a420a285f37d60d91507e6)

(Thanks, Bill.)

Ah, very cool.  I agree with Bill as well.

Thank you for all your help Nickel!

Tab
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Dec, 2006, 06:01:21
Παρακαλώ, Νίκο, και αργοπορημένα χρόνια πολλά!
Title: There is only one good . . .
Post by: bklynboy on 15 Dec, 2006, 01:03:27
I'm looking for a translation for "There is only one good, knowledge, and only one evil, ignorance."  Actually I already have the translation, but was hoping that Nickel could render it in Lithos.

Much obliged.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 15 Dec, 2006, 06:12:14
@bklynboy: I see I've become the forum's official Lithos (stone) inscriber.

Here's the Greek text from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of the Philosophers (ii, 30):

ἓν μόνον ἀγαθὸν εἶναι, τὴν ἐπιστήμην, καὶ ἓν μόνον κακόν, τὴν ἀμαθίαν

And the Lithos bit:
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: bklynboy on 15 Dec, 2006, 16:46:49
You have indeed.  Many thanks.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: paulsos on 15 Dec, 2006, 20:51:47
hi nickel i wonder if you could help translate my name+ wifes and sons name into greek and ancient greek please
my name is PAUL my wifes name is JANETand my sons name is RHYS
have a good xmas thanks paul
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 15 Dec, 2006, 21:02:48
Paul comes from the Roman nickname "Paulus", which meant "small", which later became a "proper" name. St Paul was at first known as Saul, and took his new name mainly to mark his conversion from Jew to Christian, but also presumably because it was close to the original. The Greek for it is Παύλος.

Janet is a diminutive of Jane, the feminine form of John, and the Greek equivalent is Ιωάννα.

Rhys is a Welsh name and we have no equivalent for it. We transliterate it as Ρυς or Ρις.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 17 Dec, 2006, 08:59:34
Πρωινό Κυριακής οπότε συγχωρέστε την πολυλογία...

Έχω γενικά την εντύπωση ότι (εκτός όσων έχουν κάποια ελληνική ρίζα), αυτό που τους ενδιαφέρει είναι να δείχνει "ξένο" για coolness factor, δηλαδή να περιέχει γράμματα που δεν είναι κοινά με τα λατινικά. Επίσης να μοιάζει ελληνικό στα μάτια τους και μια και η εμπειρία τους είναι κυρίως τα κεφαλαία γράμματα από τα fraternities/sororities, αυτό σημαίνει να είναι στα κεφαλαία και οπωσδήποτε με κάποιο από τα Γ, Δ, Θ, Λ, Ξ, Π, Σ, Φ, Ψ, Ω. Όσο περισσότερα, τόσο το καλύτερο γι αυτούς! Πχ είμαι βέβαιος ότι αν τους πει κανείς ότι μια χαρά τατουάζ είναι το ΦΩΣ για τους χαρούμενους ή η ΘΛΙΨΙΣ/ΘΛΙΨΗ για τους μελαγχολικούς θα ξετρελαίνονταν :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Dec, 2006, 14:00:11
Συμφωνώ απόλυτα, lycos, και ήθελα κάποια στιγμή να ανοίξω μια συζήτηση απευθυνόμενη προς τους ελληνόφωνους του νήματος. Μια είναι η διάσταση τού να βρούμε εμείς κάποια ενδιαφέρουσα πληροφορία για όλους μας και άλλη τού να φτιάξεις το πιο πετυχημένο μοτίβο για χαράκωμα... Άλλη ώρα θα καταθέσω τα συμπεράσματα που έχω βγάλει.
Title: Re: Remember
Post by: Kurstennicole on 19 Dec, 2006, 02:07:03
θυμηθείτε

i want a tattoo that says remember.
i found this word, but on your site i found another one
which is correct? and if that ones wrong what the heck does it mean?!
thank you so much!
Title: Re: Remember
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Dec, 2006, 03:22:47
θυμηθείτε

i want a tattoo that says remember.
i found this word, but on your site i found another one
which is correct? and if that ones wrong what the heck does it mean?!
thank you so much!


Θυμηθείτε sounds fine to me as modern Greek, but I'll leave it to the real Hellenophones to decide.
On the other hand, since you posted in "Tattoos and Ancient Greek," I'll give you the ancient forms:  μνήσθητι (ΜΝΗΣΘΗΤΙ) singular, μνήσθητε (ΜΝΗΣΘΗΤΕ) plural.
Title: Re: Remember
Post by: wings on 19 Dec, 2006, 03:30:57
θυμηθείτε

i want a tattoo that says remember.
i found this word, but on your site i found another one
which is correct? and if that ones wrong what the heck does it mean?!
thank you so much!
Can you give us some context for "remember"?
Title: Re: Faith, hope, love
Post by: chopper on 19 Dec, 2006, 05:38:18
i'm looking for a translation for the words FAITH, HOPE, LOVE--in all caps
Title: Re: Faith, hope, love
Post by: Katerina Dimopoulou on 19 Dec, 2006, 05:42:53
ΠΙΣΤΙΣ (ancient greek) / ΠΙΣΤΗ  (modern greek) = faith
ΕΛΠΙΣ (agk) / ΕΛΠΙΔΑ (mgk) = hope
ΑΓΑΠΗ (the same for both a & mgk) = love

Title: fear purging - hesemus phobus
Post by: paddyc on 19 Dec, 2006, 11:02:46
hey folks

    trying to get this in ancient greek to go with my other greek tattoos...

    Its the spartan for "fear purging" it was something like.... Hesemus Phobus


can any one translate the correct phrase into ancient greek for me?

   many thanks



paddy
www.chupasart.com
Title: Re: Remember
Post by: banned8 on 19 Dec, 2006, 14:37:17
Can you give us some context for "remember"?

I think the asker is referring to ΜΕΜΝΗΣΟ, as in this message (https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=3757.msg9743#msg9743).
Title: Re: Remember
Post by: wings on 19 Dec, 2006, 14:58:48
I think the asker is referring to ΜΕΜΝΗΣΟ, as in this message (https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=3757.msg9743#msg9743).

Then, modern Greek would be different, too. I am referring to Bill's answer.
Title: Re: fearless
Post by: Tabro on 20 Dec, 2006, 03:29:45
Hello again all!  I have a friend that wanted to know if you could translate a word for him.  He is wanting "Fearless".  Many thanks.

Tab
Title: Re: fearless
Post by: lycos on 20 Dec, 2006, 04:11:16
I'd go for ΑΤΡΟΜΗΤΟΣ (ἀτρόμητος)
Title: Re: Remember
Post by: Kurstennicole on 20 Dec, 2006, 06:45:37
i want it to be in the context of remembering thigns that have happened and lessons, just a broad "remember"
so the word i would be looking to use is ΜΕΜΝΗΣΟ in this context?
thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kurstennicole on 20 Dec, 2006, 21:44:31
can you translate the font like you did for "eternal love" on page 4
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Dec, 2006, 21:57:43
Here are a few remember's in Times New Roman:

(Ancient Greek)

Μέμνησο

(Biblical Greek)

Ἐνθυμοῦ

(Modern Greek)

Θυμηθείτε or

Να θυμάστε or

Μην ξεχνάτε (Do not forget)
Title: Re: fearless
Post by: banned8 on 20 Dec, 2006, 22:01:26
@tabro:

I'd go for ΑΤΡΟΜΗΤΟΣ (ἀτρόμητος)

Or (more common in ancient Greek):

ΑΦΟΒΟΣ ἄφοβος
Title: Re: fear purging - hesemus phobus
Post by: banned8 on 20 Dec, 2006, 22:11:21
spartan for "fear purging" it was something like.... Hesemus Phobus

This is funny. I'm not at all familiar with any of the 'fear shedding' stuff I've read here (http://www.christchurchsummit.org/Sermons-2002/020310-DrivingBackFear.html).

What's more, hesma (χέσμα), mentioned in that text, is more like excrement than shedding.

The noun from the verb χέομαι is χύσις, but χύσις φόβου (shedding of fear) does not ring a single bell. So hang on, until someone with better ideas comes along or I find the time for some research into this.

(Άκου εκεί «χέσμα φόβου»!)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Katerina Dimopoulou on 21 Dec, 2006, 01:16:55
Although χέσμα φόβου could indeed be very appropriate, I would think that the greek word is ἑσμή, from ἵημι = release, let go - in which case ἑσμά is the doric form, as Pressfield says.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 21 Dec, 2006, 01:46:45
This is in reply to a private message for the words 'destiny' and 'dream' in ancient Greek:

destiny:

μοῖρα  ΜΟΙΡΑ

dream:

ὄναρ  ΟΝΑΡ

or

ὄνειρον   ΟΝΕΙΡΟΝ

or

ἐνύπνιον   ΕΝΥΠΝΙΟΝ

in that order of preference.
Title: Re: fear purging - hesemus phobus
Post by: Katerina Dimopoulou on 21 Dec, 2006, 22:16:37

    Its the spartan for "fear purging" it was something like.... Hesemus Phobus


Looking for something else, I came across a passage reading as follows:

In Aristophanes' times, the laxative attributes of fear were a common motif, "dyeing oneself brown" (for example) serving as a widespread metonym for being afraid.

I wonder whether it is χέσμα after all. But then, χέσμα should be 'chesma' and not 'hesma'. What I find most interesting, though, is that I can find no reference to χέσμα φόβου, nor to ἑσμὰ φόβου. Acc. to LSJ χέσμα = excrement; the word occurs in Galenus and in the Scholia to Aristophanes. No reference is made to the Spartans and the ritual of 'fear-shedding'. As for ἑσμά, it appears only in medieval dictionaries - in other words, ἑσμὰ φόβου is simply my own guess. I really wonder where Pressfield got this from.
Title: Unconditional love -> Αγάπη χωρίς όρους
Post by: PdoubleE on 23 Dec, 2006, 09:02:55
i am getting a tatto and i want it to be in greek..   a fancy greek style, Calligraphy maybe?      i have ebony and ivory in aribic   and i would like to translate love and hate   i cannot find it Anywhere online.   thank you Much
~Greg
Title: Re: Unconditional love- hate
Post by: spiros on 23 Dec, 2006, 11:29:13
Unconditional love = Αγάπη χωρίς όρους

hate = Μίσος
Title: Re: Unconditional love -> Αγάπη χωρίς όρους
Post by: Leon on 23 Dec, 2006, 11:54:54
I think άνευ όρων αγάπη is better (especially for a tattoo), but maybe it's just down to personal opinion...
Title: Re: Unconditional love -> Αγάπη χωρίς όρους
Post by: dkf on 23 Dec, 2006, 11:55:47
Another idea for unconditional love: Απόλυτη αγάπη

Cheers!
Title: Re: Unconditional love
Post by: lycos on 23 Dec, 2006, 15:29:03
Perhaps δίχως is slightly more lyric than χωρίς

"Αγάπη δίχως όρους"

Title: Re: Unconditional love -> Αγάπη χωρίς όρους
Post by: banned8 on 23 Dec, 2006, 15:37:21
i would like to translate love and hate

Give the customer what the customer wants.

Αγάπη και μίσος
Title: mystification, Deception , and Enmity
Post by: PdoubleE on 23 Dec, 2006, 18:59:56
I would like to translate  mystification,  Deception , and Enmity from english into greek, Or words with similar meaning
And I have found Love, Hope,  And Faith already on here so thank you
Title: Re: mystification, deception, enmity
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Dec, 2006, 20:23:59
 >I would like to translate  mystification,  Deception , and Enmity >from english into greek.

Ancient Greek:
mystification = ΑΠΟΡΙΑ  (ἀπορία)
deception = ΑΠΑΤΗ  (ἀπάτη)
enmity = ΕΧΘΡΑ  (ἔχθρα)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: PdoubleE on 23 Dec, 2006, 22:58:19
srry so many questions..  and greatly appreaciated.    What would  Doubt translated into greek be in greek.
Again.. Thank you much
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Dec, 2006, 23:15:11
What would  Doubt translated into greek be?

You can also use ΑΠΟΡΙΑ for this, if you mean "perplexity."  Or you can use ΑΜΦΙΣΒΗΤΗΣΙΣ (ἀμφισβήτησις) if you mean debate or dispute about something.  Or ΑΠΙΣΤΙΑ (ἀπιστία) if you mean "disbelief."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: paddyc on 24 Dec, 2006, 21:54:44
hey folks

just seen the replies from nuckel and Katerina Dimopoulou, many thanks for that, I will re read the book soon and let you know the exact phrase and happy christmas

     many thanks paddy


www.chupasart.com
Title: Oceans
Post by: islantis on 28 Dec, 2006, 16:11:56
Hi.
I am interested in getting a tattoo in ancient greek.

I'd like to know if "oceans" and oceans not ocean can be translated in ancient greek?
It is the name of a song that means a lot to me, but i'd like it written in upper case ancient greek.

Can anyone help me, thankyou! :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 28 Dec, 2006, 17:04:41
ΩΚΕΑΝΟΙ

"Ocean" does come from the Greek word ωκεανός, originally the great stream or river (in Homer) supposed to encompass the disk of the earth, and personified as ‘the god of the great primeval water’, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and husband of Tethys; hence, the great outer sea, as opposed to the Mediterranean [Oxford English Dictionary].
Title: Willpower
Post by: Gitane on 28 Dec, 2006, 22:16:04
I would like to know if there is a word for 'willpower' in ancient Greek.

And also i would like to know what the translation would be of:

Be brave
Be bold
Be free

Thank you so much already!

Title: Live Life Through Children's Eyes
Post by: tommyfoil on 29 Dec, 2006, 00:14:52
was wondering if someone could translate this phrase as  i want to make a tatoo with it............ "Live Life Through Childrens Eyes"   if you can i would appretiate it
Title: Re: Live Life Through Children's Eyes
Post by: user2 on 29 Dec, 2006, 00:59:03
The simplest thing to say would be
Ζήσε τη ζωή μέσα από τα μάτια των παιδιών
or maybe
Βλέπε τη ζωή μέσα από τα μάτια των παιδιών
("look at life...", instead of "live life...")
Title: Re: Willpower
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Dec, 2006, 06:35:03
I would like to know if there is a word for 'willpower' in ancient Greek.

And also i would like to know what the translation would be of:

Be brave
Be bold
Be free
The ancients might have come close to our notion of "will power" with an expression like ἀδαμάντινος προθυμία (ΑΔΑΜΑΝΤΙΝΟΣ ΠΡΟΘΥΜΙΑ) — literally "stubborn, unconquerable desire/zeal."

Be brave:  θαρρεῖν (ΘΑΡΡΕΙΝ)
Be bold:  τολμᾶν  (ΤΟΛΜΑΝ)
Be free:  ἐλευθέρως βιῶναι (ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΩΣ ΒΙΩΝΑΙ)

______________________________________
Cavalleria Classica
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: islantis on 29 Dec, 2006, 09:28:54
ΩΚΕΑΝΟΙ

"Ocean" does come from the Greek word ωκεανός, originally the great stream or river (in Homer) supposed to encompass the disk of the earth, and personified as ‘the god of the great primeval water’, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and husband of Tethys; hence, the great outer sea, as opposed to the Mediterranean [Oxford English Dictionary].

Thank you nickel!
This might sound silly, but how do i make it plural? like I know it reads Ocean but would it change to say Oceans?
Also can these be translated into uppercase ancient greek..

- Black
- Given to fly

Thank you your help is really appreciated :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Dec, 2006, 10:35:19
Thank you nickel!
This might sound silly, but how do i make it plural? like I know it reads Ocean but would it change to say Oceans?
Also can these be translated into uppercase ancient greek..

- Black
- Given to fly
ΩΚΕΑΝΟΙ  is already plural, as you requested.
Black:  ΜΕΛΑΣ is masculine singular;  get back to us if you need another gender or number.
Given to fly:  If you mean "tending to fly (as a bird flies)," it's  ΜΕΛΛΩΝ ΠΤΗΝΑΙ (masculine singular).  Again, other genders or plural would require changes.
Title: Re: Willpower
Post by: Gitane on 29 Dec, 2006, 11:22:40
The ancients might have come close to our notion of "will power" with an expression like ἀδαμάντινος προθυμία (ΑΔΑΜΑΝΤΙΝΟΣ ΠΡΟΘΥΜΙΑ) — literally "stubborn, unconquerable desire/zeal."

Be brave:  θαρρεῖν (ΘΑΡΡΕΙΝ)
Be bold:  τολμᾶν  (ΤΟΛΜΑΝ)
Be free:  ἐλευθέρως βιῶναι (ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΩΣ ΒΙΩΝΑΙ)

______________________________________
Cavalleria Classica

Wow, thank you billberg23! I have one more question though, does modern Greek have another word for willpower than ancient Greek?
Title: Re: Willpower
Post by: wings on 29 Dec, 2006, 11:42:34
Wow, thank you billberg23! I have one more question though, does modern Greek have another word for willpower than ancient Greek?

Well, in Modern Greek we would actually say η δύναμη της θέλησης.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: garyindiana on 30 Dec, 2006, 21:16:32
Could someone please help me with "Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth." Would it even make sense to get it in all upper case? If so could someone show me that too? i just can't help but to laugh thinking you guys are all tricking me into getting some vulgarity permanently etched into my skin.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: bw_tps on 30 Dec, 2006, 21:18:57
Hello.  I really want something different for my "tattoo."  It's a bit cliche but nobody I know has one of this genre--which is nice.  

If anybody would be so kind, to help me with translating:

Determined
Perseverance
Driven
WillFull

All if possilbe, all in capital letters, too?

Thanks.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 30 Dec, 2006, 21:24:31
Could someone please help me with "Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth." Would it even make sense to get it in all upper case? If so could someone show me that too? i just can't help but to laugh thinking you guys are all tricking me into getting some vulgarity permanently etched into my skin.

Your question has already been answered at: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=6666.msg46086#msg46086

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 30 Dec, 2006, 22:43:59
Determined
Perseverance
Driven
WillFull
Determined = ΑΥΘΑΔΗΣ
Perseverance = ΚΑΡΤΕΡΙΑ.  "Persevering" is ΚΑΡΤΕΡΟΣ masculine,  ΚΑΡΤΕΡΑ feminine.
Driven = ΠΡΟΘΥΜΟΣ
Wilful = ΥΠΕΡΦΡΩΝ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: islantis on 31 Dec, 2006, 08:02:34
ΩΚΕΑΝΟΙ  is already plural, as you requested.
Black:  ΜΕΛΑΣ is masculine singular;  get back to us if you need another gender or number.
Given to fly:  If you mean "tending to fly (as a bird flies)," it's  ΜΕΛΛΩΝ ΠΤΗΝΑΙ (masculine singular).  Again, other genders or plural would require changes.

Yes I am female so I would need that gender :)

Thank you so much for your help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 31 Dec, 2006, 08:16:38
Yes I am female so I would need that gender :)
So black = ΜΕΛΑΙΝΑ
and given to fly = ΜΕΛΛΟΥΣΑ ΠΤΗΝΑΙ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: islantis on 31 Dec, 2006, 10:28:37
So black = ΜΕΛΑΙΝΑ
and given to fly = ΜΕΛΛΟΥΣΑ ΠΤΗΝΑΙ

Thank you so much! :)

Sorry I'm being so annoying, lol.
One last request, could you also translate "Love" and "Trust" in ancient greek for me, uppercase and lowercase?

I promise thats the last thing I ask for, i had many ideas! Thankyou! :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 31 Dec, 2006, 16:29:40
One last request, could you also translate "Love" and "Trust" in ancient greek for me, uppercase and lowercase?
Love = ΑΓΑΠΗ, ἀγάπη
Trust = ΠΙΣΤΙΣ, πίστις
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: RainmakerPKP on 03 Jan, 2007, 10:53:59
i am thinking about getting a tattoo in ancient greek. i am also thinking about getting it in modern greek. the phrase i am getting tattood is:

LIVE EVER
DIE NEVER

the context is live ever, as in to live long, eternally forever, and to die never, to never give up. they are almost the same phrase, but diffrent, so it might be hard to translate. if someone could translate this in ancient and modern green in capitals it would be VERY much appreciated :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Denny on 03 Jan, 2007, 20:08:57
I also am looking to get a tattoo and found this in one of the replies:  "Not Simply to Live...But to Live Well" (οὐ τὸ ζῆν...αλλὰ τὸ εὖ ζῆν).  I would like to know how to translate my name Dennis into ancient Greek.  I'm not sure if that's possible or if I use Dionysus, assuming that Dennis is a derivative of that.

Thank You.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 03 Jan, 2007, 20:15:52
i am thinking about getting a tattoo in ancient greek. i am also thinking about getting it in modern greek. the phrase i am getting tattood is:

LIVE EVER
DIE NEVER

the context is live ever, as in to live long, eternally forever, and to die never, to never give up. they are almost the same phrase, but diffrent, so it might be hard to translate. if someone could translate this in ancient and modern green in capitals it would be VERY much appreciated :)

Modern Greek might be something like ΠΑΝΤΟΤΕ ΝΑ ΖΗΣΕΙΣ and  ΠΟΤΕ ΝΑ ΜΗΝ ΠΕΘΑΝΕΙΣ, but let's wait for the true hellenophones to render it accurately.

Hellenophone's addition: ΝΑ ΖΕΙΣ ΑΙΩΝΙΑ for the first one. Slightly better and in line with the ancient rendering.

In any case, ancient Greek is ΕΙΣ ΑΙΩΝΑ ΖΗΝ and ΜΗΠΟΤΕ ΑΠΟΘΑΝΕΙΝ.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 03 Jan, 2007, 20:28:38
I also am looking to get a tattoo and found this in one of the replies:  "Not Simply to Live...But to Live Well" (οὐ τὸ ζῆν...αλλὰ τὸ εὖ ζῆν).  I would like to know how to translate my name Dennis into ancient Greek.  I'm not sure if that's possible or if I use Dionysus, assuming that Dennis is a derivative of that.

Thank You.
"Dennis" is actually derived from French "Denys," which in turn is derived from Latin "Dionysius," which in turn is derived from Greek ΔΙΟΝΥΣΙΟΣ (Διονύσιος), which means "gift of the god Dionysus."  So the pagan parents of St. Dionysius (after whom you are named), in naming him, must have attributed his conception and/or birth to the influence of the god of wine and ecstatic spirituality.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Denny on 03 Jan, 2007, 20:52:00
That's great!  Thank you for the very quick reply.  Is the translation you used ancient Greek and is that the same as the quote I included?  Do you or anyone else in the forum post a font that I could use for a tattoo for both the quote and my name?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 03 Jan, 2007, 21:04:57
For RainmakerPKP.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Denny on 03 Jan, 2007, 21:44:36
Nickel,

Thank you for the reply but I think 2 messages were mixed.  I was looking for the translation and font (lower & upper case) for:

Not simply to live...but to live well

and

Dionysius

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 03 Jan, 2007, 21:51:49
A bit of confusion is inevitable...
Title: Passion Tattoo
Post by: jasoreo on 05 Jan, 2007, 00:05:39
I wondering how the word passion is spelled out in Greek. I wanna get it tattoed on me but I want to make sure I have got it right. Been doing alot of research and found that this place might be able to help me out. So if their is anybody out their that can help me I would greatly appreciate it.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 Jan, 2007, 01:44:23
For jasoreo:

ΠΑΘΟΣ / Πάθος, in the sense of loving with passion or the passion of Christ.
Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: ILIANA27 on 05 Jan, 2007, 03:56:49
Hi Nickel,

This is the most fantastic website I have ever come across..
I have been thinking about getting a tattoo for a while..

I want to get the word 'Eleutheria', but was wondering if it is said the same way in Ancient Greek.

Also are they any other quotes you can recommend that follow the same lines of freedom..
Not too long, as I dont want an essay on my body. Something smart and to the point.

Thanks for your help.

Iliana
Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: banned8 on 05 Jan, 2007, 04:24:26
Oh yes, eleutheria is quite old. You can find it in Herodotus, and the day of freedom is ἐλεύθερον ἦμαρ in Homer.

My favourite saying in that spirit comes from modern Greek and this chap here (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigas_Feraios):

Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά.

i.e. (almost word for word): Whoever thinks freely thinks well.
Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: ILIANA27 on 05 Jan, 2007, 04:43:47
Thanks Nickel!


Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά'

Can this be put in Ancient Greek also?



Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: banned8 on 05 Jan, 2007, 05:00:13
Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά.

Can this be put in Ancient Greek also?

It can, but I won't do it. I'm not in favour of intralingual translation in the case of sayings of historical significance.

Give us some time and we'll come up with something appropriate in ancient Greek.

Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: banned8 on 05 Jan, 2007, 05:15:03
How about this, for example:

Τὸ εὔδαιμον τὸ ἐλεύθερον, τὸ δ’ ἐλεύθερον τὸ εὔψυχον.

It comes from Pericles' funeral oration as reported by Thucydides and means: happiness is the fruit of freedom and freedom of valour.
Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Jan, 2007, 05:32:02
That's excellent, nickel;  we could also ransack Herodotus for appropriate passages, and there would be many, but what stands out in my mind is again in modern Greek, the inscription Kazantzakis wrote for his own tombstone:  Δεν ελπίζω τίποτα, δε φοβούμαι τίποτα, είμαι ελεύθερος!  (I have no hope, I have no fear, I am free!)

[Nαι, το ξέρω ότι το έγραψε "λέφτερος,"  μα να μην μπερδέψω τον πελάτη ...] 
Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: banned8 on 05 Jan, 2007, 05:42:33
I should be kicking myself for not remembering my fellow citizen's epitaph. And that's another one I wouldn't translate into ancient Greek.


[Γράφει "λεύτερος" στον τάφο του, που θα μπέρδευε λιγότερο τον πελάτη :-]
Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Jan, 2007, 06:09:24
[Γράφει "λεύτερος" στον τάφο του, που θα μπέρδευε λιγότερο τον πελάτη :-]
(http://)
Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: ILIANA27 on 05 Jan, 2007, 07:43:15


Thanks for your help today!

I think i might just leave it as Eleutheria, otherwise its just going to be too big.

I understand Greek, not confused at all : )

Iliana
Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Jan, 2007, 08:52:07
I understand Greek, not confused at all : )
Γι' αυτό έχω μάθει να μην κάνω προϋποθέσεις (blush)!
Title: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: banned8 on 05 Jan, 2007, 12:54:59
[Γράφει "λεύτερος" στον τάφο του, που θα μπέρδευε λιγότερο τον πελάτη :-]

Δεν ήταν κόλπο για να σε βάλω να μας δώσεις φωτογραφία σου, φανταστικέ Μπιλ. Αλλά the usual web misinformation. Η δική μου μνήμη από την επίσκεψη στον τάφο (λίγο μετά την ταφή του) δεν βοηθούσε. Αλλά μια φωτογραφία αξίζει περισσότερο από 5.670 Google hits.
Title: Re: ελευθερία -> freedom
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Jan, 2007, 16:46:42
Η δική μου μνήμη από την επίσκεψη στον τάφο (λίγο μετά την ταφή του) δεν βοηθούσε.
The epitaph was elusive at that time.  It was stuck in movable letters to a rough wooden cross.  When I saw it in 1961, most of the letters had fallen out (or been plucked out).  Luckily, a couple of kids were playing (marbles?) on the ground near the cross.  When I asked them what had been written there, one of them stood up, cupped his hands as if reciting in school, and intoned the epitaph.  Nick, it was an incredibly moving experience. 
Title: Jacob Michael
Post by: ashley5306 on 06 Jan, 2007, 19:30:36
I am getting a tattoo of my sons name (jacob) in greek, since i am greek. and i was wondering if someone could please translate it for me.  Jacob and also Jacob Michael.   and are greek numbers different?  if so could you do 5-3-06 also.  sorry if i seem like an idiot.. i just don't have any clue on greek writing, but this is something i have been wanting to do since he was born. thanks for your help.
Title: Re: Jacob Michael
Post by: wings on 06 Jan, 2007, 19:37:07
I am getting a tattoo of my sons name (jacob) in greek, since i am greek. and i was wondering if someone could please translate it for me.  Jacob and also Jacob Michael.   and are greek numbers different?  if so could you do 5-3-06 also.  sorry if i seem like an idiot.. i just don't have any clue on greek writing, but this is something i have been wanting to do since he was born. thanks for your help.

Jacob ->  Ιακώβ
Michael -> Μιχαήλ

There is no change in numbers. But if you mean the date of birth by "5-3-06", then in Greek it should be "5-3-06" if you mean "5 March 2006" or it should become "3-5-06" if you mean "3 May 2006".
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 06 Jan, 2007, 23:42:40
If you want actual Greek numbers, you should go for ε'-γ'-,βς'
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tabro on 08 Jan, 2007, 06:20:29
Hello all!  I am looking to get the following translated...

"Death comes for us all"
"Not every man really lives"
"Live every moment"

I'm wanting an inspirational type saying.  If any of you have any suggestions I would appreciate it!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Jan, 2007, 07:54:41
"Death comes for us all"
"Not every man really lives"
"Live every moment"
Death comes to us all:  Ἡμῖν δὲ πᾶσιν ἐπέρχεται ὀ θάνατος  ΗΜΙΝ ΔΕ ΠΑΣΙΝ ΕΠΕΡΧΕΤΑΙ Ο ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ
Not every man really lives:  Οἱ μὲν τῷ ὄντι ζῶσιν, οὶ δ' οὔ  ΟΙ ΜΕΝ ΤΩΙ ΟΝΤΙ ΖΩΣΙΝ, ΟΙ Δ' ΟΥ  (Literally, "Some really live, others don't.")
Live every moment:  Πᾶν ἀκαρὲς χρόνου διαβιῶναι  ΠΑΝ ΑΚΑΡΕΣ ΧΡΟΝΟΥ ΔΙΑΒΙΩΝΑΙ

That's the best we can do at the moment.  Stay tuned for updates. 
Title: Re: Remember, you must die
Post by: RainmakerPKP on 08 Jan, 2007, 13:41:39
could someone translate the phrase "Remember, you must die" for me in ancient greek. i am thinking of getting that as a tattoo, it would be very much appreciated. thank you very much :)
Title: Re: Remember, you must die
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Jan, 2007, 17:32:16
could someone translate the phrase "Remember, you must die" for me in ancient greek.
Μέμνησο ὅτι χρή σε ἀποθανεῖν  ΜΕΜΝΗΣΟ ΟΤΙ ΧΡΗ ΣΕ ΑΠΟΘΑΝΕΙΝ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 08 Jan, 2007, 22:45:50
To shorten it, how about ΜΕΜΝΗΣΟ ΑΠΟΘΑΝΕΙΝ ΧΡΗ ?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Jan, 2007, 23:50:57
That sounds great.  If we eliminate OTI, however, then we should change XPH to XPHN.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 09 Jan, 2007, 00:12:28
Don't we say ΘΑΡΣΕΙΝ ΧΡΗ?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 09 Jan, 2007, 02:14:04
Don't we say ΘΑΡΣΕΙΝ ΧΡΗ?
Of course, meaning "it is necessary to be brave."  But here, after "remember," we need either OTI XPH ("that it is necessary") or the infinitive XPHN ("it to be necessary").
Title: Warrior
Post by: Brevan on 12 Jan, 2007, 11:04:27
ok all i really need to know is how to translate "warrior" into acient greek.  I may be intrested in using it as a tattoo, but i guess it depends... soo  if you could translate as lower case and all capitols that would be great.
word.

p.s.  dont know if it makes a diffrence but im talking about warrior as in : hercules was a great "warrior".  I am a true "warrior".
Title: Re: Warrior
Post by: banned8 on 12 Jan, 2007, 14:42:53
warrior

μαχητής           ΜΑΧΗΤΗΣ
Title: Re: Warrior
Post by: Brevan on 12 Jan, 2007, 21:47:51
hey thanks nickel, i really appreciate it.  Just one more ??.... I do like the capoitol letters better, but if you were getting the same tattoo i was, would you get it done exactly as it appears in the text above (not taking shading and outlining ect. into account) or is there a way to make the letters look better? perhaps a certain font or something. my knowledge of this is limited but the only letter that really looks greek is the "Σ" at the end.
thanks!
Title: Re: Warrior
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Jan, 2007, 23:26:49
I do like the capoitol letters better, but if you were getting the same tattoo i was, would you get it done exactly as it appears in the text above (not taking shading and outlining ect. into account) or is there a way to make the letters look better? perhaps a certain font or something. my knowledge of this is limited but the only letter that really looks greek is the "Σ" at the end.
The Greek words you folks like to use on your tattoos  have a lot of history and culture behind them.  We respect the words themselves more than the poor little symbols that are used to write them.  Those symbols were borrowed by the Romans to make your alphabet, just as the Greeks had borrowed symbols from the Phoenicians to make their own alphabet.  If I commit my body to wearing a word for the rest of my life, I’ll consider the meaning of the word far more important than the exotic shape of its letters.  How would you feel if someone you loved refused to wear your name on his/her body because the spelling of it wasn’t decorative enough?  Of course, if your interest is mainly in appearance, you always have the option of creating your own alphabet.  You could make it as strange and mysterious as you like, and it might turn out to be much more exotic than the Greek, with even less chance of anyone being able to read it! :-)))   
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Poing on 12 Jan, 2007, 23:52:32
Sorry guys but I dont know how formal this orum is ,so....
Im going to be stressed out at first ok?
if u want  a Cd in Ancient Greek Language buy yourselves
Έσσεται Ήμαρ-Terror X Crew(greeks not txc from London)
ok?
it's very good!a bit alternative but really good
hope u ll enjoy c ya
Title: Re: Warrior
Post by: Brevan on 13 Jan, 2007, 00:35:11
The Greek words you folks like to use on your tattoos  have a lot of history and culture behind them.  We respect the words themselves more than the poor little symbols that are used to write them.  Those symbols were borrowed by the Romans to make your alphabet, just as the Greeks had borrowed symbols from the Phoenicians to make their own alphabet.  If I commit my body to wearing a word for the rest of my life, I’ll consider the meaning of the word far more important than the exotic shape of its letters.  How would you feel if someone you loved refused to wear your name on his/her body because the spelling of it wasn’t decorative enough?  Of course, if your interest is mainly in appearance, you always have the option of creating your own alphabet.  You could make it as strange and mysterious as you like, and it might turn out to be much more exotic than the Greek, with even less chance of anyone being able to read it! :-)))   

ummmm yes i do care more about the word's meaning much more than how it looks. if i didnt i would just ask for a greek word that looked cool.  Also you may have noticed i emphasized FONT im query.  Font is only changing how the word LOOKS not what it MEANS... imagine a person where english is a foriegn language to them... they go to a site where someone translates to english but they dont like how it looks.  You dont have to change the spelling or what it says, theire are plenty of other options: lower case, upper case, diffrent fonts, or even writing it in cursive. If im going to get a word premantly written on my body, i think it would be wise to explore all possible ways of writing it, wouldnt you agree??     
Title: Re: Warrior
Post by: wings on 13 Jan, 2007, 01:01:11
ummmm yes i do care more about the word's meaning much more than how it looks. if i didnt i would just ask for a greek word that looked cool.  Also you may have noticed i emphasized FONT im query.  Font is only changing how the word LOOKS not what it MEANS... imagine a person where english is a foriegn language to them... they go to a site where someone translates to english but they dont like how it looks.  You dont have to change the spelling or what it says, theire are plenty of other options: lower case, upper case, diffrent fonts, or even writing it in cursive. If im going to get a word premantly written on my body, i think it would be wise to explore all possible ways of writing it, wouldnt you agree??     

Brevan, what you don't see is that the way these letters look won't change because of the font. Again, Σ will still be look like the only "Greek" letter.

You can see what I mean here, where I have used various different fonts, though I still prefer the font Nickel had used earlier:

ΜΑΧΗΤΗΣ
ΜΑΧΗΤΗΣ
ΜΑΧΗΤΗΣ
ΜΑΧΗΤΗΣ
ΜΑΧΗΤΗΣ
ΜΑΧΗΤΗΣ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 13 Jan, 2007, 01:02:01
ummmm yes i do care more about the word's meaning much more than how it looks. if i didnt i would just ask for a greek word that looked cool.  Also you may have noticed i emphasized FONT im query.  Font is only changing how the word LOOKS not what it MEANS... imagine a person where english is a foriegn language to them... they go to a site where someone translates to english but they dont like how it looks.  You dont have to change the spelling or what it says, theire are plenty of other options: lower case, upper case, diffrent fonts, or even writing it in cursive. If im going to get a word premantly written on my body, i think it would be wise to explore all possible ways of writing it, wouldnt you agree??     
Yes, I'm focused better now on your emphasis on "font."  Sorry to have been misled by the statement that "the only letter that really looks greek is the Σ at the end."  I can't help remembering that the Roman alphabet (the one you use) is originally the Greek alphabet with just a few changes, so it all "looks Greek" to me. 
Nickel and Wings are the Font Masters here.  I'm sure they'll give you some input if they have the time. 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Jan, 2007, 01:11:06
Font Master? Did I hear my name?

Well, if you don't want the starkness of the Lithos font, which seems to be the favourite here for Ancient Greek (first one in the picture), you can always go for some of the Byzantine fonts. Fancy ecclesiastical fonts, really; don't tie in very well with 'warrior', but what the heck, let's give it a go.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 14 Jan, 2007, 11:24:32
If you want more letters that don't exist in the Latin Alphabet, try

ΠΟΛΕΜΙΣΤΗΣ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: greekgoddess on 17 Jan, 2007, 18:26:59
hi, firstly i would like to say how wonderful it is to see so many people interested in the Greek language, makes one so proud to be Greek!! and what a fantastic site this is!
Now I'm on of those unfortunate people who is Greek by blood but not Greek by tongue! It infuriates me immensely.. Well anyway, i am extremely proud of my heritage, and are thinking about getting a tattoo in Greek, either modern or attic.. i am thinking of either the word PRINCESS (obviously English) or maybe a Greek phrase you speak of in other messages, if there is one someone could suggest, in keeping with the Princess idea. or/and the word Goddess! hope there is someone who may be able to help or enlighten me, paraka-lo!?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 17 Jan, 2007, 20:37:30
Well anyway, i am extremely proud of my heritage, and are thinking about getting a tattoo in Greek, either modern or attic.. i am thinking of either the word PRINCESS (obviously English) or maybe a Greek phrase you speak of in other messages, if there is one someone could suggest, in keeping with the Princess idea. or/and the word Goddess! hope there is someone who may be able to help or enlighten me, paraka-lo!?
First suggestion from the ancient realm: ΔΕΣΠΟΙΝΑ (δέσποινα), meaning "lady" (of the land, of the house, etc., female counterpart of a lord).  It was often joined to the names of goddesses.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Jan, 2007, 08:53:08
i am thinking of either the word PRINCESS (obviously English) or maybe a Greek phrase you speak of in other messages, if there is one someone could suggest, in keeping with the Princess idea.
And here's another one in ancient Greek:  ΠΟΤΝΙΑ (πότνια).  Meaning mistress (of humans, of animals, of crops, etc,), it was also used with names of goddesses, esp. Athena.  A really powerful combination could be ΔΕΣΠΟΙΝΑ ΠΟΤΝΙΑ, since ΔΕΣΠΟΙΝΑ by itself often referred to Persephone, the ultimate princess.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: triki on 19 Jan, 2007, 22:17:51
Hello, I was just wondering if someone could help me translate these quotes in Greek.

I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
-- William Allen White quotes

Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.
-- William Shakespeare quotes

Any help would be appreciated :D

Thanks !
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 19 Jan, 2007, 23:20:48
In modern Greek:

I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.

Δεν φοβάμαι το αύριο, γιατί έζησα το χτες και λατρεύω το σήμερα.
(Translation already available on the web)

Δεν με φοβίζει το αύριο, γιατί είδα το χτες και λατρεύω το σήμερα.
(Alternative translation)

Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.

Να τους αγαπάς όλους, να εμπιστεύεσαι λίγους και να μην κάνεις κακό σε κανέναν.
(Translation by Errikos Belies)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tc-9 on 23 Jan, 2007, 09:38:23
I was looking for the translation of the name "Eugene" which i understand has some Greek roots...i have read that it means well-born...and i am wanting the translation of this name "Eugene" for a tattoo...thank you for your time
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 23 Jan, 2007, 13:03:51
I was looking for the translation of the name "Eugene" which i understand has some Greek roots...i have read that it means well-born...and i am wanting the translation of this name "Eugene" for a tattoo...thank you for your time

Ευγένιος
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tc-9 on 23 Jan, 2007, 21:44:37
thanks a lot...also one last question just to make sure that am i correct that "eugene" means well-born or something around that?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 23 Jan, 2007, 23:05:50
"eugene" means well-born

Yes (http://www.google.com/search?num=100&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&rls=GGGL%2CGGGL%3A2006-32%2CGGGL%3Aen&q=%22eugenes%22+%22well-born%22&btnG=Search).

Also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugene
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: F_idάνι on 23 Jan, 2007, 23:11:29
I don't know the exact origin of the name, but it bears connotations of  good lineage, nobility and courtesy.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tc-9 on 25 Jan, 2007, 21:21:07
thanks again....one last translation...could you translate the word "strength" and the word "courage" in upper and lower cases?  Thank you once again
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Jan, 2007, 21:51:23
could you translate the word "strength" and the word "courage" in upper and lower cases?
Strength:  ΣΘΕΝΟΣ  σθένος
Courage:  ΘΑΡΣΟΣ   θάρσος
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: timshannon22 on 26 Jan, 2007, 03:49:48
Hello All!!  I recently found out that I am greek (I was adopted after birth) and I have started the process of learning more about my heritage.  I also found out that I have two brothers and extended family still living somewhere in Greece.  I am about to graduate college and I always wanted to get a tattoo, as long as it held a special meaning for me.  I have a multi-faceted question for you experts . .

First, i have heard that greeks don't value tattoos and piercings because they feel the body is sacred and shouldn't be tarnished, is this accurate? 

Second, I am curious if there are any common greek tattoo designs, perhaps of an ancient origin (given my first question is inaccurate)?

and Third, I would like to get the translation in both upper and lower case for the words: "virtue" and "brotherhood"

Thank you so much for helping me.  I look forward to possibly asking more questions about my heritage as I travel this path in life.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 26 Jan, 2007, 05:21:29
Hello All!!  I recently found out that I am greek (I was adopted after birth) and I have started the process of learning more about my heritage.  I also found out that I have two brothers and extended family still living somewhere in Greece.  I am about to graduate college and I always wanted to get a tattoo, as long as it held a special meaning for me.  I have a multi-faceted question for you experts . .

First, i have heard that greeks don't value tattoos and piercings because they feel the body is sacred and shouldn't be tarnished, is this accurate? 

Second, I am curious if there are any common greek tattoo designs, perhaps of an ancient origin (given my first question is inaccurate)?

and Third, I would like to get the translation in both upper and lower case for the words: "virtue" and "brotherhood"

Thank you so much for helping me.  I look forward to possibly asking more questions about my heritage as I travel this path in life.
Congratulations on your happy discovery!  The sun will soon rise in the homeland of your ancestors, and others will awaken to answer your immediate and future questions.  In the meantime, I can tell you the ancient words you seek:
Virtue:  ΑΡΕΤΗ  ἀρετή
Brotherhood:  ΑΔΕΛΦΟΤΗΣ  ἀδελφότης
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: timshannon22 on 26 Jan, 2007, 06:02:17
thank you so much billberg23, i appreciate your help and your kind words.  I look forward to picking your brain more in the future.
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: chitajmc on 26 Jan, 2007, 22:37:23
I would also like to get a tattoo w/my name in Greek.  I am part Greek but was never fortunate enough to live around any of my Greek relatives.  One of my cousins sent me my name in Greek but I saw some other letters that were different so I am not so sure.  Can someone help me?

My name is Jennifer
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 26 Jan, 2007, 23:29:04
For chitajmc (Jennifer):
Enjoy your tattoo, ΤΖΕΝΙΦΕΡ  (Τζένιφερ) !
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 27 Jan, 2007, 02:17:44
I would also like to get a tattoo w/my name in Greek.  I am part Greek but was never fortunate enough to live around any of my Greek relatives.  One of my cousins sent me my name in Greek but I saw some other letters that were different so I am not so sure.  Can someone help me?

My name is Jennifer

It's your body of course, but having a Greek transliteration of your name doesn't make sense. Perhaps go for a Greek translation of your name? Jennifer is a Cornish name derived from the original Welsh Gwynhwyfar, its first synthetic word meaning "white, blessed, holy" and the second "smooth" (See this Irish guy trying to translate it in Irish (http://www.namenerds.com/irish/problem.html)). So having that in mind, your name could be ΛΕΥΚΗ/λευκή (white), which is an actual Greek name. Now if you like the (somewhat inaccurate as the above guy mentions) meaning of "white wave", there is an Ancient Greek name tailored for it, which is ΛΕΥΚΙΠΠΗ/Λευκίππη , Leucippe (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leucippe), an Oceanid (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oceanid), nymph (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nymph) of the white wave.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Jan, 2007, 02:50:14
On the other hand, seeing that it's a Cornish form of Guinevere (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guinevere), familiar from the wife of King Arthur, you may choose the old Greek form for that name (which can raise a few eyebrows even among the Greeks):

Γενιέβρη (from the French Guenièvre (https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reine_Gueni%C3%A8vre))
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Jan, 2007, 03:16:56
Now if you like the (somewhat inaccurate as the above guy mentions) meaning of "white wave", there is an Ancient Greek name tailored for it, which is ΛΕΥΚΙΠΠΗ/Λευκίππη , Leucippe (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leucippe), an Oceanid (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oceanid), nymph (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nymph) of the white wave.
Λευκίππη is a very "land-locked" name.  Meaning "driver of white horses" (LSJ, if we need a reference), it was given to several individuals in Greek mythology, none of them related to Okeanos.
Jennifer, do any of the above suggestions resemble your cousin's rendering of your name in Greek?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 27 Jan, 2007, 03:26:05
Λευκίππη is a very "land-locked" name.  Meaning "driver of white horses" (LSJ, if we need a reference), it was given to several individuals in Greek mythology, none of them related to Okeanos.

This is wrong then? (https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%9B%CE%B5%CF%85%CE%BA%CE%AF%CF%80%CF%80%CE%B7_(%CE%A9%CE%BA%CE%B5%CE%B1%CE%BD%CE%AF%CE%B4%CE%B1))
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Jan, 2007, 03:45:10
This is wrong then? (https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%9B%CE%B5%CF%85%CE%BA%CE%AF%CF%80%CF%80%CE%B7_(%CE%A9%CE%BA%CE%B5%CE%B1%CE%BD%CE%AF%CE%B4%CE%B1))
I regret that I hadn't seen the Greek version of Wikipedia.  The English version is more conservative, mentioning Leucippe simply as one of the nymphs with whom Persephone played in a meadow.  She is not listed by Hesiod as a daughter of Okeanos.  In the Homeric hymn, some of Persephone's playmates are taken from Hesiod's list, and the inclusion of Leucippe might give the impression that she, too, is an Oceanid.  Her name, and its association with the horse, would seem to belie this, however.  But of course Poseidon was god both of horses and of the sea.  So one never knows.  Apologies for sounding so definitive!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Jan, 2007, 04:01:21
@lycos: You're trying to combine an admittedly wrong interpretation of the meaning of Gwynhwyfar ("white ghost (http://www.google.com/search?num=100&hl=en&safe=off&rls=GGGL%2CGGGL%3A2006-32%2CGGGL%3Aen&q=guinevere+%22white+ghost%22&btnG=Search)", according to most sources) with an extension of the meaning of a word that, after all, means "rider or driver of white horses", made up of the words white + horse.

In that case, why not simply Λευκοθέα, white goddess?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 27 Jan, 2007, 15:49:24
I like Λευκοθέα.

It's true I've approached this more as a game. It's a long shot translating a name and I enjoy the discovery process! We're trying to have a close match in terms of meaning and use a real Greek name.

So I'll try to deviate from the last condition and just translate the actual meaning. I'm afraid I don't know the word ghost in Ancient Greek, perhaps billberg23 who is the Ancient Greek guru? :-) Going with the modern Greek one, φάντασμα, perhaps Λευκόφαντη;
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Jan, 2007, 17:34:15
Going with the modern Greek one, φάντασμα, perhaps Λευκόφαντη;
Sure, or Λευκειδώλη or Λευκοψύχη.  Or even simply Λευκώ.  But somehow I suspect that Jennifer will prefer to see her own name in Greek, no matter how elegant our constructs may be.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 27 Jan, 2007, 17:39:26
Sure, or λευκειδώλη or λευκοψύχη.  But somehow I suspect that Jennifer will prefer to see her own name in Greek, no matter how elegant our constructs may be.

Indeed. Please, let's not confuse askers who don't know Greek and only ask for their name in Greek characters.:-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Connaki on 29 Jan, 2007, 09:01:07
Hi, I want to get a tattoo of Alexander The Great's famous quote: "Nothing is impossible to him who will try..." in Ancient Greek - can you please give me the translation to this?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 29 Jan, 2007, 09:43:26
I don't know the provenance of the specific quotation, but my suggestion, on the basis of Plutarch's life of Alexander, is:

Οὐδὲν τοῖς θαρροῦσιν ἀνάλωτον.

Nothing is impossible to those who dare.
Title: TATTOO TRANSLATION
Post by: PINKDRAGONJMNC on 29 Jan, 2007, 22:10:47
I am getting a tattoo in remembrance of my mother. I want it to say   MOTHER   and  under that I want it to say  UNFORGETTABLE.  Can someone give me the translation for these 2 words?
Title: Re: TATTOO TRANSLATION
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Jan, 2007, 23:20:19
Ancient Greek:
Mother =  ΜΗΤΗΡ  (μήτηρ)
Unforgettable =  ΑΕΙΜΝΗΣΤΟΣ  (ἀείμνηστος)
Modern Greek is probably quite similar, but stay tuned!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: PINKDRAGONJMNC on 30 Jan, 2007, 05:58:23
Thank You very much!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: KeyKeeper on 31 Jan, 2007, 08:33:56
I've been thinking about a tattoo that read, "Till Death Do us Both". as a spin off of the phrase we say when we get married "Till death do us part." Can that be translated effectively into ancient Greek? Thank you for you time.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 31 Jan, 2007, 17:01:27
I've been thinking about a tattoo that read, "Till Death Do us Both". as a spin off of the phrase we say when we get married "Till death do us part." Can that be translated effectively into ancient Greek? Thank you for you time.
Attic Greek (5th-4th cent. B.C.):
ΕΩΣ ΑΝ ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ ΝΩ ΔΙΑΦΘΕΙΡΗΙ  (upper case)
ἕως ἂν θάνατος νὼ διαφθείρῃ (lower case)
Literally, "Till death destroy the two of us."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: KeyKeeper on 01 Feb, 2007, 00:06:39
Thanks a million.
Title: Relentless
Post by: tommyfoil on 05 Feb, 2007, 05:29:29
i want to get the word  RELENTLESS tattood on my back......... can you do that for me please?  much appretiated


Moderator's note: The subject of the post should contain only the word you wish to translate, according to the rules.
Title: Re: Relentless
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Feb, 2007, 19:12:26
i want to get the word  RELENTLESS tattood on my back......... can you do that for me please?  much appretiated
Can't tell whether you want ancient or modern Greek; nor do you specify which sense of "relentless" you intend.  In any case, here are the choices in ancient Greek:
If you mean "harsh," "pitiless," it's ΣΧΕΤΛΙΟΣ (σχέτλιος) [or ΣΧΕΤΛΙΑ (σχετλία) if you're female].
If you mean "persistent," "stubborn," it's ΑΥΘΑΔΗΣ (αὐθάδης).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 Feb, 2007, 19:26:09
To add to Bill's suggestions, in modern Greek we might prefer:

ΑΔΥΣΩΠΗΤΟΣ - αδυσώπητος

("inexorable" in both ancient and modern Greek)
Title: dean
Post by: Costa on 06 Feb, 2007, 02:44:35
i need it for a tattoo please :)
Title: One life, Once chance
Post by: Georgeous1 on 06 Feb, 2007, 03:05:33
I was wondering the translation for "One life, Once chance" would be. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
Title: Re: dean
Post by: billberg23 on 06 Feb, 2007, 04:17:08
i need it for a tattoo please :)
English "dean" is derived ultimately from ancient Greek ΔΕΚΑΝΟΣ (δεκανός) , meaning "one who presides over a ten-man group."  So you could use this, or the ancient word for "president," which is  ΠΡΥΤΑΝΙΣ  (πρύτανις).
Finally, you might choose the modern Greek word for "dean," ΑΡΧΙΜΑΝΔΡΙΤΗΣ (αρχιμανδρίτης).
Title: Re: One life, Once chance
Post by: billberg23 on 06 Feb, 2007, 04:20:27
I was wondering the translation for "One life, Once chance" would be. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
Μία ζωή, μία εὐκαιρία.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Teryn on 09 Feb, 2007, 10:57:13
Hi guys.
If possible, could someone please show me some font styes for Τλῆθι and τέτλαθι as "Endure". I think I would prefer lower case lettering.
Thankyou! :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 09 Feb, 2007, 14:19:09
could someone please show me some font styes for Τλῆθι and τέτλαθι as "Endure".

Please have a look at the PDF with the samples attached to this message.
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=3757.msg39326#msg39326
Title: The Lord Provides
Post by: JMach on 09 Feb, 2007, 18:11:48
I want "The Lord Provides" on a tattoo.  Can you help me with this??  Thank you!  Joel
Title: Re: The Lord Provides
Post by: billberg23 on 09 Feb, 2007, 20:36:59
I want "The Lord Provides" on a tattoo. 

Ultimately, this popular saying seems to go back to ΚΥΡΙΟΣ ΕΙΔΕΝ (κύριος εἶδεν) in Genesis 22.14, which is the Septuagint translation of Hebrew Jehovah Jireh (or, more accurately, Yahweh Yireh).  Literally, it means "The Lord saw (to it)," i.e. God provided Abraham with a ram to substitute for his son Isaac as a sacrifice.  Yahweh Yireh is what Abraham called the place of sacrifice, and the words came to be popular as an attribute, or a secondary name, of God. Hebrew coming up shortly, in case you prefer the original text to the Greek translation.

Title: Re: The Lord Provides
Post by: billberg23 on 09 Feb, 2007, 22:21:47
I want "The Lord Provides" on a tattoo.
Ah, here we are, in Hebrew:  יְהוָה יִרְאֶה
(From http://net.bible.org/passage.php?passage=Gen+22:14#n1)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: copper on 10 Feb, 2007, 09:55:37
Well I've been through most of this thread and it's amazing. You guys are wonderful for taking the time to do this. I had a question, going to add courage in ancient greek to a tattoo that I already have. I knew I wanted the word, decided on Ancient Greek after reading Aristotle's writings on courage as one of the foremost virtues. Can anyone tell I've takes one to many ancient philosophy classes =). My question is I've found two translations ΕΥΤΟΛΜΙΑ and ΘΑΡΣΟΣ can anyone tell me which is correct, oh and i would also like the spelling in lower case if possible. Thank you
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: copper on 10 Feb, 2007, 11:27:36
Not sure how important context is in this case. Looking for an all encompassing idea of courage both physical and moral. In its extreme heroic form and its very simple ie getting out of bed on a cold day ; )
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Feb, 2007, 15:03:00
Looking for an all encompassing idea of courage both physical and moral. In its extreme heroic form and its very simple ie getting out of bed on a cold day ; )
θάρσος is the word you want here.
εὐτολμία means "boldness" and wouldn't quite suit the latter case.  :-)
Title: greek tattoo
Post by: Lucas on 10 Feb, 2007, 23:04:22
hey everyone, just a quick but important question on mybehalf. i am planning to get 2 tattoos, one written across my wrist saying LOVE FOREVER CHANGES and one written around my waist from the wording on jim morrisons gravestone KATA DAIMONA EAYTOY - true to his own spirit,

i have a few questions, is the quote on jim morrisons grave in ancient greek or modern greek
and could someone please give me the upper and lower case letterings for both the sayings i wish to have done, obviosly i want to make sure i get it right as i have to live with it

many thanks
lucas
x
Title: Re: greek tattoo
Post by: banned8 on 10 Feb, 2007, 23:13:06
For Jim M's gravestone, see:
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=3403.0

Κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού

It goes back to the Stoics.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: aristotle88 on 11 Feb, 2007, 02:21:42
What a great thread! i am going to get a tattoo in greek very soon and i just wanted to explore the fonts for the following quote   "God has entrusted me with myself"  i would like to see it in both ancient greek and modern greek with the appropriate capitals. Thank you so much for your assistance!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Feb, 2007, 04:20:25
i am going to get a tattoo in greek very soon and i just wanted to explore the fonts for the following quote   "God has entrusted me with myself"  i would like to see it in both ancient greek and modern greek with the appropriate capitals.
Here's a suggestion for the ancient Greek:
ΘΕΟΣ ΜΟΙ ΠΑΡΕΔΩΚΕΝ ΕΜΑΥΤΟΝ
I'll leave the rest to the Fontmaster.
Title: Re: greek tattoo
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Feb, 2007, 04:34:50
i am planning to get 2 tattoos, one written across my wrist saying LOVE FOREVER CHANGES ... and could someone please give me the upper and lower case letterings for both the sayings.
Love forever changes:  Ο Δ' ΕΡΩΣ ΑΕΙ ΠΕΡΙΠΕΤΗΣ  (ὀ δ' ἔρως ἀεὶ περιπετής).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tabro on 11 Feb, 2007, 19:04:21
Hello again all!  I think I've finally decided on what I want to get.  Could you please translate "Nothing is impossible" for me?  Thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Feb, 2007, 19:18:04
Hello again all!  I think I've finally decided on what I want to get.  Could you please translate "Nothing is impossible" for me?  Thanks!
ΟΥΔΕΝ ΑΔΥΝΑΤΟΝ  (οὐδέν ἀδύνατον)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Hoplite16 on 13 Feb, 2007, 04:51:47
Hi. First of all I must say that what you folks(Wings, Nickel) have been doing deserves a great deal of respect with all the selflessness you have showed by simply helping others without recieving any material reward.

Ok here it goes..
 
I am wanting to know the Ancient Translation for the following....

"Shield or Glory"       and     "Spartan"

You help is much appreciated... 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Hoplite16 on 13 Feb, 2007, 04:52:42
Your*
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 13 Feb, 2007, 05:11:52
"Shield or Glory"       and     "Spartan"
1)  AΣΠΙΣ  Η  ΚΛΕΟΣ  (ἀσπὶς ἢ κλέος)
2)  ΛΑΚΕΔΑΙΜΟΝΙΟΣ  (Λακεδαιμόνιος) or ΣΠΑΡΤΙΑΤΗΣ  (Σπαρτιάτης)
Title: Alive in Christ in ancient greek (New Testament Greek)
Post by: olibear on 14 Feb, 2007, 15:39:21
Hi everybody.

After I've done a lot of research of the internet, I found this website.
I'd like to know what the phrase "Alive in Christ" (A and C in capital letters) is in Greek of the New Testament.
It is for a tattoo. As far as I know, it is possible to write in Greek with Microsoft Word (symbol font). For this reason it would be great to know the phrase in latin letters as well.
Thanks.
Title: Re: Alive in Christ in ancient greek (New Testament Greek)
Post by: billberg23 on 14 Feb, 2007, 16:12:21
Hi everybody.

After I've done a lot of research of the internet, I found this website.
I'd like to know what the phrase "Alive in Christ" (A and C in capital letters) is in Greek of the New Testament.
It is for a tattoo. As far as I know, it is possible to write in Greek with Microsoft Word (symbol font). For this reason it would be great to know the phrase in latin letters as well.
Thanks.

Ephesians 2.4-5 doesn't actually use those words.  What Paul says is "But God, being rich in mercy, through the great love with which he loved us, made us alive together with Christ, even though we were dead through our trespasses."  "Made us alive together with Christ" is ἡμᾶς συνεζωοποίησεν τῷ Χριστῷ.
St. Jerome translated the phrase into Latin as nos convivificavit Christo.
Title: Re: Alive in Christ in ancient greek (New Testament Greek)
Post by: olibear on 14 Feb, 2007, 16:27:55
Ephesians 2.4-5 doesn't actually use those words.  What Paul says is "But God, being rich in mercy, through the great love with which he loved us, made us alive together with Christ, even though we were dead through our trespasses."  "Made us alive together with Christ" is ἡμᾶς συνεζωοποίησεν τῷ Χριστῷ.
St. Jerome translated the phrase into Latin as nos convivificavit Christo.

Thank you. This phrase might be a bit long for a tattoo.
I've found a word in a dictionaty: zao (alive) http://www.foreignword.com/Tools/dictsrch_aff.asp?menu=N&query=alive&src=BP&go=Translate&trg=CQ
I like the meaning of this word. Does it have the meaning in the context my phrase stands?
Title: Re: Alive in Christ in ancient greek (New Testament Greek)
Post by: billberg23 on 14 Feb, 2007, 17:17:49
Thank you. This phrase might be a bit long for a tattoo.
I've found a word in a dictionaty: zao (alive) http://www.foreignword.com/Tools/dictsrch_aff.asp?menu=N&query=alive&src=BP&go=Translate&trg=CQ
I like the meaning of this word. Does it have the meaning in the context my phrase stands?
In fact, the root za- , "live," (cp. zoe, "life") is the basis for the word συνε-ζωο-ποίησεν in the phrase I gave you. 
Title: Re: Alive in Christ in ancient greek (New Testament Greek)
Post by: olibear on 14 Feb, 2007, 19:43:37
In fact, the root za- , "live," (cp. zoe, "life") is the basis for the word συνε-ζωο-ποίησεν in the phrase I gave you. 

Ok. I've found the following in eSword (a Bible Software): συζωοποιέω Χριστός (had quickened us together with Christ). Does this mean about the same, as your phrase?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 14 Feb, 2007, 20:08:03
Your Bible Software is not giving you a phrase.  It's giving you two different elements:  (a) the first person singular, present active indicative of the verb συνεζωοποίησεν, and (b) the nominative singular of the noun Χριστῷ.  It gives you these forms so that you can look them up easily in any Greek dictionary.
Meanwhile, the phrase remains the same:  ἡμᾶς συνεζωοποίησεν τῷ Χριστῷ, of which "hath quickened us together with Christ" is the King James translation.
   
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: olibear on 15 Feb, 2007, 00:02:28
Sorry, that I bother you with this topic on and on.
I'd like to know if this phrase could be shortened somehow?
 συνεζωοποίησεν (suzwopoiew,v ) is explained as (http://www.greekbible.com/index.php)
 1) to make one alive together  1a) of Christians, with Christ.
Thanks a lot.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Feb, 2007, 00:46:55
Sorry, that I bother you with this topic on and on.
I'd like to know if this phrase could be shortened somehow?
 
Sorry, I'm not in favor of altering biblical texts (or any ancient text, for that matter).
Your "Greek Bible" source gives a reasonable translation and (1a) interpretation of συνεζωοποίησεν.  By the way, don't be confused by "quickened."  That's 17th-century English for "enlivened," so it means the same as "made alive."  (Cf. the expression "The quick and the dead," = "The living and the dead.") 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Iwanna on 15 Feb, 2007, 02:29:13
Hi Guys this thread is awesome! Im looking at getting a tattoo but havent yet decided what to get! I was looking for something really meaningful and powerful like "hell hath no fury as a woman scorned" but then i thought id be patriotic and get something in Greek instead. Any good ideas for me? something from mythology or a philosopher??
Thanks heaps!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Iwanna on 15 Feb, 2007, 05:03:34
hi guys can someone translate this for me into ancient greek?

Live today, forget the cares of the past - by Epicurus
and secondly,

Bear patiently, my heart - for you have suffered heavier things - by Homer

Thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Feb, 2007, 06:01:54
Bear patiently, my heart - for you have suffered heavier things - by Homer
Tέτλαθι δή, κραδίη· καὶ κύντερον ἄλλο ποτ' ἔτληςOdyssey 20.18
Title: Live your dream. -> Somnium transfer in vitam tuam. / Vive somnium tuum.
Post by: alexandros! on 15 Feb, 2007, 15:57:21
Καλησπέρα! Μπορείτε να μου μεταφράσετε την φράση "Ζήσε τ' όνειρό σου" στα λατινικά? Ευχαριστώ! Αλέξανδρος
Title: Re: live your dream
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Feb, 2007, 16:17:50
Πρόταση:  Somnium transfer in vitam tuam.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: olibear on 15 Feb, 2007, 16:21:06
Your "Greek Bible" source gives a reasonable translation and (1a) interpretation of συνεζωοποίησεν.  By the way, don't be confused by "quickened."  That's 17th-century English for "enlivened," so it means the same as "made alive."  (Cf. the expression "The quick and the dead," = "The living and the dead.") 

Ok. So, if συζωοποιέω is the infinitive, συνεζωοποίησεν would be the present perfect?
Is that correct?
Title: Re: live your dream
Post by: alexandros! on 15 Feb, 2007, 16:35:45
ευχαριστω πολυ! Μου ειχαν πει ομως πως ειναι "vive tuum somnium". ειναι λαθος; Αλεξανδρος
Title: Re: Live your dream. -> Somnium transfer in vitam tuam. / Vive somnium tuum.
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Feb, 2007, 17:07:03
Όχι λάθος.  Αλλά somnium tuum είναι πιό ευφραδές.
Title: Re: Live your dream. -> Somnium transfer in vitam tuam. / Vive somnium tuum.
Post by: alexandros! on 15 Feb, 2007, 17:23:06
συγγνωμη που γινομαι κουραστικος και επιμενω. την φραση την θελει ο αδερφος μου για τατουαζ.. vive=ζησε, tuum=το δικο σου, somnium=ονειρο. κανω λαθος; (δεν ξερω καθολου καλα λατινικα). Οποτε δεν ειναι καλυτερα vive tuum somnium; συγγνωμη και παλι για την επιμονη μου.. Αλεξανδρος
Title: Re: Live your dream. -> Somnium transfer in vitam tuam. / Vive somnium tuum.
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Feb, 2007, 18:15:14
συγγνωμη που γινομαι κουραστικος και επιμενω. την φραση την θελει ο αδερφος μου για τατουαζ.. vive=ζησε, tuum=το δικο σου, somnium=ονειρο. κανω λαθος;
Όλα σωστά.
Quote
(δεν ξερω καθολου καλα λατινικα). Οποτε δεν ειναι καλυτερα vive tuum somnium;
Πρόκειται για φυσική ροή της γλώσσας.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Feb, 2007, 18:39:02
Ok. So, if συζωοποιέω is the infinitive, συνεζωοποίησεν would be the present perfect?
Is that correct?
συζωοποιέω is not an infinitive. 
A verb is always entered into a dictionary under its first principal part.  In English, the first principal part of a verb is the bare verb, e.g. "bring," "lose," "love," etc.  In Greek, the first principal part is the first person singular present active indicative, so "I bring," "I lose," "I love," etc.  So your dictionary lists the first principal part of Paul's συνεζωοποίησεν as συζωοποιέω, which is, as I mentioned above, the first person singular, present active indicative ("I make alive with").
Many dictionaries phrase definitions (sloppily) as infinitives:  so in your dictionary (under συζωοποιέω), instead of the more accurate "I make alive," you find "to make alive."
Finally, συνεζωοποίησεν is simple past, despite the fact that the King James version translates it loosely as a present perfect.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Feb, 2007, 06:21:07
Hi Guys this thread is awesome! Im looking at getting a tattoo but havent yet decided what to get! I was looking for something really meaningful and powerful like "hell hath no fury as a woman scorned" but then i thought id be patriotic and get something in Greek instead. Any good ideas for me? something from mythology or a philosopher??
Thanks heaps!
We haven't forgotten you, Iwanna (Iωάννα?), but it's not easy to find something that's just right.  Will modern Greek work as well for you as ancient Greek?
Αs for ancient Greek, you might consider the two famous sayings inscribed in the temple of Apollo at Delphi by the Seven Sages:
ΓΝΩΘΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ  (γνῶθι σαυτόν), "Know yourself," and  ΜΗΔΕΝ ΑΓΑΝ  (μηδέν ἄγαν),  "Nothing too much."
The two statements were universally regarded by the Greeks as representing ultimate wisdom.  The latter was particularly hard for them to live up to, thank goodness.     
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Lucas on 16 Feb, 2007, 18:56:03
hey, thanks so much for the reply for the tattoos, i have decieded on a font i like but was wondering if  i could word the saying i want in the font i like, i am in south america at the moment in rio so communicating to the tattoo artist is not easy , the saying is this

Κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού- true to his own spirit

bu i would like to see it in this style below   with more of a slant like italics if possible , so i can give it too the tattoo artist

Πηγή της ζωής είναι η αγάπη. ( style of font)

thank u so much for all the help , i am very  very thankful

lucas
x
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 16 Feb, 2007, 19:09:04
Πηγή της ζωής είναι η αγάπη. ( style of font)

Could you please give us the page number or the message link for this?
Title: Latin Phrase
Post by: martj8 on 20 Feb, 2007, 22:56:45
I am getting a greek god tattoo and I need a phrase translated.

In latin it is Si vis pacem, para bellum

The english translation is If you wish peace, prepare for war
Title: Re: Latin Phrase
Post by: billberg23 on 20 Feb, 2007, 23:52:41
I am getting a greek god tattoo and I need a phrase translated.

In latin it is Si vis pacem, para bellum

The english translation is If you wish peace, prepare for war
ΕΙΡΗΝΗΝ ΕΙ ΕΘΕΛΕΙΣ, ΠΟΛΕΜΟΝ ΠΑΡΑΣΚEYΑΖΕ
Lower case: Εἰρήνην εἰ ἐθέλεις, πόλεμον παρασκεύαζε

Better yet, maybe, is a quote from Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics 1177b5:
ΠΟΛΕΜΟΥΜΕΝ ΙΝ' ΕΙΡΗΝΗΝ ΑΓΩΜΕΝ
Πολεμοῦμεν ἵν' εἰρήνην ἄγωμεν
(We make war so that we may live in peace.)
Title: two roads diverged
Post by: Soul on 21 Feb, 2007, 07:29:23
Hello,

I'm hoping to get "two roads diverged" translated into Ancient Greek. Any similar concept (such as "two paths crossed") will also be fine. It is part of my favourite poem, "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost. To put it into context:

I shall be telling this with a sigh 
Somewhere ages and ages hence: 
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— 
I took the one less traveled by, 
And that has made all the difference.

Any help with this would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
Title: Re: two roads diverged
Post by: billberg23 on 21 Feb, 2007, 08:47:50
Hello,

I'm hoping to get "two roads diverged" translated into Ancient Greek. Any similar concept (such as "two paths crossed") will also be fine. It is part of my favourite poem, "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost. To put it into context:

I shall be telling this with a sigh 
Somewhere ages and ages hence: 
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— 
I took the one less traveled by, 
And that has made all the difference.

Any help with this would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
Literally, "two roads diverged" would be δισσαὶ ἐσχίσθησαν ὁδοί ;  but cf. Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus 900, ἔνθα δίστομοι συμβάλλουσιν ὁδοί, "where branching roads meet."  Using Sophoclean language, then, "two paths crossed" would be δίστομοι συνέβαλον ὁδοί.
Title: Strength and Honor
Post by: Decio on 23 Feb, 2007, 22:45:39
My brother and I are getting tattoo's in honor of our late father.  We all shared a deep love for the movie "Gladiator" and this was what was said while they would salute.  I'm really hoping to get the correct translation so I don't end up permanently marking someone's joke for something this important to us.  Also if it is not asking too much, I would be most appreciative of how it would be pronounced.

Thank You
Title: Re: Strength and Honor
Post by: billberg23 on 24 Feb, 2007, 02:36:31
My brother and I are getting tattoos in honor of our late father.  We all shared a deep love for the movie "Gladiator" and this was what was said while they would salute.  I'm really hoping to get the correct translation so I don't end up permanently marking someone's joke for something this important to us.  Also if it is not asking too much, I would be most appreciative of how it would be pronounced.

Thank You
I haven't seen the film, so I don't know what they were supposed to have said there.  In real life, gladiatorial shows were mostly an Italian taste, so the gladiators spoke Latin, not Greek.  Usually they saluted whoever presided over the games (often the emperor himself), pronouncing the formula Morituri te salutamus ("We who are about to die salute you").
Be that as it may, the ancient Greek for "strength and honor" would be ΔΥΝΑΜΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΙΜΗ (lower case δύναμις καὶ τιμή).
Title: Re: Strength and Honor
Post by: billberg23 on 24 Feb, 2007, 18:14:05
  Also if it is not asking too much, I would be most appreciative of how it would be pronounced.
Sorry I missed this the first time around.  Here's the pronunciation, with accented syllables in caps:
DEE-nah-miss  keh  tee-MEE  (pronounce DEE as "thee")

And sympathies on the loss of your father.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Hoplite16 on 24 Feb, 2007, 20:54:13
Can I get


"Perfection"  Translated?     Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 24 Feb, 2007, 23:33:28
Can I get


"Perfection"  Translated?     Thanks
H ΠΑΝΤΕΛΕΙΑ     ἡ παντέλεια
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kergie on 25 Feb, 2007, 21:52:29
So, I'm thinking I want a tattoo in Ancient Greek. 

I've done a little research, and I know I want the phrase:  "I praise God."   It comes out to be "Doxazo Theon" (I believe), but I want it in Ancient Greek characters.

Thanks for the help!

--Kergie
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Feb, 2007, 23:10:05
So, I'm thinking I want a tattoo in Ancient Greek. 

I've done a little research, and I know I want the phrase:  "I praise God."   It comes out to be "Doxazo Theon" (I believe), but I want it in Ancient Greek characters.

Thanks for the help!

--Kergie
ΔΟΞΑΖΩ ΤΟΝ ΘΕΟΝ   (δοξάζω τὸν Θεόν)
Title: Grace
Post by: justabitoff on 27 Feb, 2007, 10:13:29
Hi, I am planning on getting two tattoos, one of "faith" in ancient hebrew, and one of "grace" in ancient greek. could you tell me what "grace" is in ancient greek? and if there are different kinds of grace, then I mean the grace in this verse: "For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God -- not by works, so that no one can boast." Ephesians 2:7,8.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Grace
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Feb, 2007, 16:29:24
Hi, I am planning on getting two tattoos, one of "faith" in ancient hebrew, and one of "grace" in ancient greek. could you tell me what "grace" is in ancient greek? and if there are different kinds of grace, then I mean the grace in this verse: "For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God -- not by works, so that no one can boast." Ephesians 2:7,8.

Thanks!
XAΡΙΣ                                          Lower case: χάρις
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Decio on 01 Mar, 2007, 20:57:53
Sorry I missed this the first time around.  Here's the pronunciation, with accented syllables in caps:
DEE-nah-miss  keh  tee-MEE  (pronounce DEE as "thee")

And sympathies on the loss of your father.

Thank you VERY much!  After some research you are absolutely correct, this should be in Latin, but I really appreciate the translation, the correction on language, and your sympathies. /salute
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Marios P on 03 Mar, 2007, 05:00:36
Hi, i would very much appreciate if you could translate the following phrase for me into ancient greek for a tattoo that i intend to get with my sister as soon as possible. The phrase is 'From the Womb to the Tomb'
Many Thanks, Marios
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 03 Mar, 2007, 06:30:18
'From the Womb to the Tomb'
Has to rhyme in Greek, too, right?  Try ΑΠΟ ΣΚΑΦΗΣ ΜΕΧΡΙ ΤΑΦΗΣ  (lower case ἀπὸ σκάφης μέχρι ταφῆς).  Literally:  "from cradle to grave."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Marios P on 03 Mar, 2007, 16:05:25
to be honest im willing to sacrifice the rhyming for something that is one hundred percent lyrically and grammatically correct and authentic. Whilst im aware there may be many ways to say the phrase, is there any chance you could list a few of the most accurate from which i could choose one? many many thanks for you help, Marios
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 03 Mar, 2007, 18:58:22
to be honest im willing to sacrifice the rhyming for something that is one hundred percent lyrically and grammatically correct and authentic. Whilst im aware there may be many ways to say the phrase, is there any chance you could list a few of the most accurate from which i could choose one? many many thanks for you help, Marios
From the womb = AΠΟ ΤΗΣ ΓΑΣΤΡΟΣ, ΑΠΟ ΤΗΣ ΝΗΔΥΟΣ, ΑΠΟ ΤΗΣ ΜΗΤΡΑΣ

To the tomb = ΜΕΧΡΙ ΤΗΣ ΘΗΚΗΣ, ΜΕΧΡΙ ΤΟΥ ΤΑΦΟΥ, ΜΕΧΡΙ ΤΟΥ ΤΥΜΒΟΥ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 03 Mar, 2007, 19:09:47
My choice from these would be:

ΑΠΟ ΓΑΣΤΡΟΣ ΜΕΧΡΙ ΤΟΥ ΤΑΦΟΥ.

In addition, in Judges 13:7 you have the choice of:

ἀπὸ γαστρὸς ἕως ἡμέρας θανάτου

ΑΠΟ ΓΑΣΤΡΟΣ ΕΩΣ ΗΜΕΡΑΣ ΘΑΝΑΤΟΥ


(from the womb to the day of death)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 04 Mar, 2007, 01:16:14
ΑΠΟ ΓΑΣΤΡΟΣ ΕΩΣ ΗΜΕΡΑΣ ΘΑΝΑΤΟΥ
Sounds like a winner to me.  Nothing beats quoting the Good Book, and it's certainly the most "lyrical" (or did you mean "literal," Marios?).
Title: semeiotics / semiotics
Post by: sicvitaest on 05 Mar, 2007, 03:30:03
hello, im new too this whole forum and message posting thing....however..i  stumbled upon this site throughout  my personal studies  onthe  internet.. im  going  to be travelling to Greece in May, for the first time..i  have been immersed in curiousity and study of philosophy and metaphysics and linguisic skepticism since junior  high school.. about 8 years ago... anyways i  have been wanting to  start getting tattoos  as symbols of my life  and  i cant think  of a better place than Greece to get my first tattoo signifying my philosophical inquiry into life  and myself..      being that tattoos themselves are symbols..  i find the phrase     " significant signs signify semiotics"  or           "dialectical semiotics of  being"       as signs significant to the idea im  attempting to conceptualize  with this tattoo.  i wish toget it in  ancient greek lower-case....and for it to incorporate the idea of semiotics into my life and into the tattoo itself;the language origin,and the place its to be done,   being the modern birthplace of philosophy.  before this gets too long...help with translation, or other possible suggestions would be greatly appreciated,  as this means  a great  deal to me . thank you  somuch...KyLe
Title: Re: semeiotics / semiotics
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Mar, 2007, 04:13:37
First, you may be interested in reading a previous Forum discussion of tatoos in Greece today at https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=7211.0.  You may conclude that Greece is not the most likely place to get your tattoo.
Second, do decide on a definite phrase that you want to use for your tattoo.  When you have done so, please post it under the topic, "Tattoos and Ancient Greek," which you'll find in the Ancient Greek Translation Forum of this site.  At that point, we'll be happy to accommodate you!
Title: Re: semeiotics / semiotics
Post by: sicvitaest on 05 Mar, 2007, 04:38:55
thanks for the dicussion forum link..it gave me a  vague conception on the cultural 'acceptance' of tattoos Greece today,  i still however am sticken on the idea of "adorning my temple with meaningful symbols" as was a reply in that discussion. You said  it  "may  not be the most likely place to get my tattoo." Is that  because it isnt  practiced there? Anyone sure  if there are any safe places to be tattooed  in  Athens or Crete?  I'll post this question at the other forum as well. Thanks again for the guidance...
Title: To see a world in a grain of sand
Post by: Starbeybe on 06 Mar, 2007, 09:11:19
Hi! I am new to this forum but have been searching for a correct translation of the following phrase into ancient greek. I would appreciate any help I could get, thanks!

"To see a world in a grain of sand"
It is part of a poem (my favorite) by William Blake

I tried using babelfish to translate, and they gave me this: δείτε έναν κόσμο σε ένα σιτάρι της άμμου

I'm not sure if that is correct if someone could send me the correct translation in ancient Greek I would really appreciate it! Thanks! (If you could post it in a better font than this one as well, that would be great!) Thanks a lot!
Title: Re: To see a world in a grain of sand
Post by: billberg23 on 06 Mar, 2007, 16:22:04
I tried using babelfish to translate, and they gave me this: δείτε έναν κόσμο σε ένα σιτάρι της άμμου
I'm not sure if that is correct; if someone could send me the correct translation in ancient Greek I would really appreciate it! Thanks! (If you could post it in a better font than this one as well, that would be great!)
Babelfish did pretty well with that one, but it gave you modern Greek.  If you really want ancient Greek, it would be more like

ἐν ἄμμου χόνδρῳ τέλειον κόσμον ἰδεῖν

Sorry I don't have a fancier font, but I can give you upper case:

EN AMMOY XONΔΡΩΙ ΤΕΛΕΙΟΝ ΚΟΣΜΟΝ ΙΔΕΙΝ


Mod's edit: Fancier font

ἐν ἄμμου χόνδρῳ τέλειον κόσμον ἰδεῖν

EN AMMOY XONΔΡΩΙ ΤΕΛΕΙΟΝ ΚΟΣΜΟΝ ΙΔΕΙΝ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Starbeybe on 07 Mar, 2007, 00:04:48
Thank you! I really appreciate it!
Title: a Part is whole, alone; only apart from Its whole; where its only a part, alone...or Apart
Post by: sicvitaest on 08 Mar, 2007, 04:28:11
Helloo all..  so i would much appreciate if someone would be able to translate this phrase to ancient greek for me. its one of a few ideas for a tattoo im hoping to get while in Greece in the coming May...thanks somuch..         also im wondering if anyone knows of any good forums or message boards or whatever with discussions on methaphysics, philosophy, psycholinguistics, pragmatics, advanced ancient civilization, modern application, etc. ..or topics of the sort??  well thanks 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kurstennicole on 08 Mar, 2007, 05:35:24
is there any way to translate the phrase:
 "Not all who wander are lost"
thank you so much, i already have had one word translated and tattooed and would love to get this quote as a tattoo!
Title: Re: a Part is whole, alone; only apart from Its whole; where its only a part, alone...or Apart
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Mar, 2007, 06:22:02
"A part is whole, alone; etc."
Sorry, you'll need to submit a much shorter phrase.  Read Forum Rules (blue button at top of this page), especially:
"1.5 If you ask for translation help please limit your query to 12 words and ALWAYS provide CONTEXT. If you want help with something bigger than that then you may contact one of the members or directly Translatum Translation Services for professional translation. If you want a free draft translation you can always use Greek machine translation."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Mar, 2007, 06:50:38
is there any way to translate the phrase:
 "Not all who wander are lost"
ΟΥ ΠΑΣ ΠΛΑΝΩΜΕΝΟΣ ΔΙΗΜΑΡΤΗΚΕ ΤΗΣ ΟΔΟΥ
Lower case:  οὐ πᾶς πλανώμενος διημάρτηκε τῆς ὁδοῦ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: echomarine on 09 Mar, 2007, 16:49:20
I know that it has probably already been addresses in this forum, but I was hoping that I could get the Ancient Greek translation of "This, or on this" (I believe that the greekish is I TAN I EPI TAS) in both all caps and lower case in that Lithos font that looks very classical. If it isn't too much trouble I would also like the Ancient Greek translation of "Come get them" in both all caps, and lower case, in the Lithos font as well. Thanks.

Without going too much into detail, I am a marine with a troubled past. I had everything from alcoholism to suicide attempts. The first quote "This, or on this" is a constant reminder to me that there is never a reason to give up. You keep fighting through everything. The second quote is like a unit motto for me. We (My Unit) try to embody the Spartan warrior ethos both in training and in the fight. I appreciate your help. I will be posting pictures of my tattoo's once i get them to show you how much they mean to me. Thank you for your help.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 09 Mar, 2007, 17:55:10
I know that it has probably already been addresses in this forum, but I was hoping that I could get the Ancient Greek translation of "This, or on this" (I believe that the greekish is I TAN I EPI TAS) in both all caps and lower case in that Lithos font that looks very classical. If it isn't too much trouble I would also like the Ancient Greek translation of "Come get them" in both all caps, and lower case, in the Lithos font as well. Thanks.
The best I can do at the moment is to refer you to earlier replies to these very popular questions.
For the first, see
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=925.msg3744#msg3744.
For the second, see
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=281.msg796#msg796.
Others may have time to help with the font later.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 09 Mar, 2007, 18:20:15
@echomarine, there's no Lithos for lower case. There was no lower case in those days, in any case.

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg299.imageshack.us%2Fimg299%2F7791%2Fspartanim2.jpg&hash=fb70744a320995e7e8885453b476940f5c1ca9e7)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: echomarine on 09 Mar, 2007, 18:49:53
Thank you so much, you help is greatly appreciated. I will post how it looks when they're done.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kurstennicole on 09 Mar, 2007, 22:46:47
thank you so much, are there any other fonts i can get that in, something kind of girly? if at all possible?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 10 Mar, 2007, 16:51:47
@Kurstennicole: Girly enough for you?

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg259.imageshack.us%2Fimg259%2F6770%2Fnotlostaj9.jpg&hash=7f12ec3bc93218bcd33af902ba86a255806fdb60)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: funkdelight33 on 11 Mar, 2007, 00:54:56
Nickel, could you please do me a favor....

I am going to use the phrase "Know Thyself" for a tatoo.  I would like to use the most correct form for the ancient times which was inscribed on the temple.  I believe it was the ALL Capitals version b/c Lithos was what they used in Ancient Greece correct.  Could you attach that in a .jpg or .bmp version so I can print it and use it to trace.  Maybe a few different fonts if not too much trouble would be GREAT!

Thanks so much!!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 11 Mar, 2007, 01:30:18
Stick to this (Lithos, upper case).

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg261.imageshack.us%2Fimg261%2F7209%2Fgnothisautonlw7.jpg&hash=b8003384905e7106f9b86d1f285ccad6083b4f6f)

See also:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Gnothi_Sauton_Reichert-Haus_in_Ludwigshafen.jpg
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: funkdelight33 on 11 Mar, 2007, 03:00:16
Perfect, thanks much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: VanWilder on 11 Mar, 2007, 05:11:11
I too was wondering if anyone could give me an accurate translation in ancient greek quotes for a tattoo. The one quote was "Come and take them" by Leonidas which I saw was already translated. The other is a quote by Alexander the Great. It is "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." I have used an online translator for it, but I dont full trust it (Plus, it's probably in modern greek, not ancient). I got "Δεν υπάρχει τίποτα αδύνατο σε τον που θα προσπαθήσει" I also looked up the greek alphabet and didn't see that first letter or the things over some of the letters. I also want it in ancient greek or whatever it would have been written in in Alexander's time. His name also, wikipedia.org says Μέγας Ἀλέξανδρος (Megas Alexandros). Again, ancient greek or whatever it would have been written in back then. Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Mar, 2007, 07:24:14
I too was wondering if anyone could give me an accurate translation in ancient greek quotes for a tattoo. The one quote was "Come and take them" by Leonidas which I saw was already translated. The other is a quote by Alexander the Great. It is "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." I have used an online translator for it, but I dont full trust it (Plus, it's probably in modern greek, not ancient). I got "Δεν υπάρχει τίποτα αδύνατο σε τον που θα προσπαθήσει" I also looked up the greek alphabet and didn't see that first letter or the things over some of the letters. I also want it in ancient greek or whatever it would have been written in in Alexander's time. His name also, wikipedia.org says Μέγας Ἀλέξανδρος (Megas Alexandros). Again, ancient greek or whatever it would have been written in back then. Thanks
Your instincts are quite good, Mr. VanWilder;  the ancient Greek for "there is nothing impossible, etc." is phrased quite differently, and means "there is nothing that cannot be seized by them who have the courage."  See https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg51361#msg51361 (Reply #616).  In capital letters (which was all they had in the days of Plutarch and Alexander) it would be  ΟΥΔΕΝ ΤΟΙΣ ΘΑΡΡΟΥΣΙΝ ΑΝΑΛΩΤΟΝ.
At least some of the difficulty arises from your seeing Greek written in lower case, with all the accents included.  Avoid lower case, and you won't have to worry about accents.  The word "megas" simply means "great."  In capital letters, "Alexander the Great" is Ο ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: VanWilder on 11 Mar, 2007, 07:42:49
Thanks a lot Billberg, you really helped me out. I also figured megas meant great, and I'm going out further on a limb and guess that the O you put at the beginning of Alexander the Great means 'the' so it'd be "the great alexander"? Does it make sense if you drop the O or did they normally write his name with the O? Just checking stuff before I make permanent additions to my skin. Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Mar, 2007, 09:42:31
Thanks a lot Billberg, you really helped me out. I also figured megas meant great, and I'm going out further on a limb and guess that the O you put at the beginning of Alexander the Great means 'the' so it'd be "the great alexander"? Does it make sense if you drop the O or did they normally write his name with the O? Just checking stuff before I make permanent additions to my skin. Thanks
With his name alone as your tattoo, you can safely leave out the article O.  If you use the name in a sentence, the definite article will normally be required, as with any proper name in Greek.  In the Greek Wikipedia article on Alexander (https://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%91%CE%BB%CE%AD%CE%BE%CE%B1%CE%BD%CE%B4%CF%81%CE%BF%CF%82_%CE%BF_%CE%9C%CE%AD%CE%B3%CE%B1%CF%82), you'll see three different versions of his name — Aλέξανδρος ο Μέγας, Μέγας Αλέξανδρος, and ο Μέγας Αλέξανδρος.
Btw check my earlier post:  I've corrected my misspelling of A's name (mistakes will happen!).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: VanWilder on 11 Mar, 2007, 10:17:49
The tattoo I was planning was basically a quotation. Two lines of the quote "ΟΥΔΕΝ ΤΟΙΣ ΘΑΡΡΟΥΣΙΝ ΑΝΑΛΩΤΟΝ" you gave me, then one line under it, "ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ." Like how when people make quotations:

"Quote"
- Person who said it

Since it's that kind of thing and not in a full sentence, I'm assuming I can drop the O. You totally confused me with that last line though. I don't know what earlier post you are referring to. The one you linked me back to in your first post contained the quote in non-capital letters, but I didn't see Alexander's name in Greek so I'm not sure what spelling mistake and correction you are talking about. I'm going to assume the ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ you gave me is right unless you say otherwise.

Btw: I'm assuming ancient greek uses different lettering than modern greek because some of the cap vs non-cap letters don't match up to the greek alphabet chart I got off the internet. Specifically, from wikipedia it says 'Μέγας Αλέξανδρος' and you said 'ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ' As far as I can tell from looking them up, the ς is Ξ in caps, not Σ. Again, I have no clue on Greek at all, and that chart is probably not ancient greek, so if you could, please clear up my confusion.  Thanks for all your help
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Mar, 2007, 10:49:36
I'm going to assume the ΜΕΓΑΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ you gave me is right unless you say otherwise.
Yes, that's got it.
The Greek alphabet (upper case) was pretty much standardized in the Alexandrian period (3rd cent. BC) and remains the same today.  The lower case developed gradually over time from cursive script, and wasn't standardized until the middle ages.  The ς (final sigma) is Σ in upper case; the ξ (xi) is Ξ in upper case.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Lucas on 11 Mar, 2007, 14:14:06
@Kurstennicole: Girly enough for you?

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg259.imageshack.us%2Fimg259%2F6770%2Fnotlostaj9.jpg&hash=7f12ec3bc93218bcd33af902ba86a255806fdb60)

Hello, just a quick question that would be greatly much appreciated.
I am getting the tattoo of true to his own spirit as on jim morrisons grave around myu waist in lower case, is it possible that anyone could show me this wording with the font that is used in the  quote.the second example down
its just so i can print it off to give to the tattoo artist.
much appreciated.

luke
Title: Strength and Honor -> Δύναμις καὶ τιμή
Post by: Marine99 on 11 Mar, 2007, 16:43:43
Hi i am very desperate to find the right translation for the tattoo i am getting in a few days. I just wanted to ask yall if you could translate the phrase "Strength and Honor" This would help me out so much.
Thank you
Title: Re: Strength and Honor
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Mar, 2007, 18:55:34
See https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.660.html (Reply #663).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 11 Mar, 2007, 19:26:31
Is this what you mean?

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg65.imageshack.us%2Fimg65%2F4215%2Fdaimonagn4.jpg&hash=2b48a94afb6de3b41a78923e4045dc5b1c214d81)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: VanWilder on 11 Mar, 2007, 21:12:56
Yes, that's got it.
The Greek alphabet (upper case) was pretty much standardized in the Alexandrian period (3rd cent. BC) and remains the same today.  The lower case developed gradually over time from cursive script, and wasn't standardized until the middle ages.  The ς (final sigma) is Σ in upper case; the ξ (xi) is Ξ in upper case.

Ok thanks, I got it. And then the Leonidas quote would be "MΟΛΩN ΛABE" with his name being spelled "ΛEΩNIΔAΣ" right? (Got off wikipedia then converted to caps). I just can't decide between the two. Alexander's is an overtly inspirational quote from the words alone, but Leonidas' quote is inspirational from the circumstances in which he said it and what it stands for... Maybe I'll get both, one on each wrist haha.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Mar, 2007, 21:27:25
Ok thanks, I got it. And then the Leonidas quote would be "MΟΛΩN ΛABE" with his name being spelled "ΛEΩNIΔAΣ" right? (Got off wikipedia then converted to caps). I just can't decide between the two. Alexander's is an overtly inspirational quote from the words alone, but Leonidas' quote is inspirational from the circumstances in which he said it and what it stands for... Maybe I'll get both, one on each wrist haha.
Works for me!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: hmwayte on 12 Mar, 2007, 00:40:47
Hello there (= I'm a new student of the classics and have discovered a passion for ancient Greek despite only having studied it for a year so far. I've decided I'd like my first tattoo to be in the language and, after viewing each and every post in this forum (not an easy task but definitely an interesting one!), I've decided upon 'Live and Learn'. I've read your reasoning for using ΓΗΡΑΣΚΩ ΑΕΙ ΔΙΔΑΣΚΟΜΕΝΟΣ but was wondering whether it would be better to change ΔΙΔΑΣΚΟΜΕΝΟΣ to ΔΙΔΑΣΚΟΜΕΝH given that I'm female. Would that be necessary/correct? Also, I realise that script was all in upper case so would it be pretty unfaithful to use lowercase letters or is it not too big of a problem?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 12 Mar, 2007, 01:12:52
Γηράσκω ἀεὶ διδασκομένη.

Beautiful!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Mar, 2007, 01:25:59
I've decided upon 'Live and Learn'. I've read your reasoning for using ΓΗΡΑΣΚΩ ΑΕΙ ΔΙΔΑΣΚΟΜΕΝΟΣ but was wondering whether it would be better to change ΔΙΔΑΣΚΟΜΕΝΟΣ to ΔΙΔΑΣΚΟΜΕΝH given that I'm female. Would that be necessary/correct?
Not necessary, but hardly incorrect!  I would probably use the feminine form if I were you.  Those aren't Solon's exact words, so it doesn't matter if you use upper case or lower case (a distinction he never knew).  What Solon actually said was
Γηράσκω δ' αἰεὶ πολλά διδασκόμενος (fr. 22.7 Diehl).  Αnd even there, you can use the feminine form without spoiling the elegiac meter;  just shift the acute accent forward.
Delighted to hear you love Greek!  Come back to us any time if you need help.
Oops, I see nickel was already here.  And I agree with him — it sounds beautiful!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: hmwayte on 12 Mar, 2007, 01:34:21
Not necessary, but hardly incorrect!  I would probably use the feminine form if I were you.  Those aren't Solon's exact words, so it doesn't matter if you use upper case or lower case (a distinction he never knew).  What Solon actually said was
Γηράσκω δ' αἰεὶ πολλά διδασκόμενος (fr. 22.7 Diehl).  Αnd even there, you can use the feminine form without spoiling the elegiac meter;  just shift the acute accent forward.
Delighted to hear you love Greek!  Come back to us any time if you need help.
Oops, I see nickel was already here.  And I agree with him — it sounds beautiful!

I'll definitely opt for the feminine version and probably lowercase too. I'm getting the tattoo done next month and I'll be sure to post a photo of it here when it's done. Thanks ever so much for your help (=
Title: Help With Accurate translation plz?
Post by: Bedhead on 12 Mar, 2007, 01:55:28
I was thinking about getting a tattoo in ancient Greek , My sister has recently got   Γνῶθι σεαυτόν  "Know yourself" on her wrist and I like the tattoo the meaning and the style and theres much more about it that I like but I was wondering if someone could translate a couple things for me please.  "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.”  and   "Give me a place to stand and I will move the earth". Your time and effort on this is very much appreciated.Thank you.


Kody
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Mar, 2007, 03:01:22
"Give me a place to stand and I will move the earth"
Δῶς μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω
Upper case:  ΔΩΣ ΜΟΙ ΠΑ ΣΤΩ ΚΑΙ ΤΑΝ ΓΑΝ ΚΙΝΑΣΩ
(Αrchimedes)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 12 Mar, 2007, 03:12:54
Excellent, Bill. If you now find the Chinese ideograms for the Confucius saying, you'll have done a complete job :-}

Come on, Bedhead/Kody. Why are you asking for a saying by Confucius to be translated into ancient Greek? Won't it look so much better if they gave you the Mandarin or whatever for that on a Chinese forum?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Mar, 2007, 05:08:08
Excellent, Bill. If you now find the Chinese ideograms for the Confucius saying, you'll have done a complete job :-}
Confucius?  You mean I can stop ransacking Thucydides?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 12 Mar, 2007, 05:21:47
Confucius?  You mean I can stop ransacking Thucydides?

Well, the web seems to think it is by Confucius.
Title: love & death -> έρως & θάνατος
Post by: cayla on 12 Mar, 2007, 05:46:12
i come from a greek / lebanese family & my sister and i wanted to get a tattoo of something meaninful.  i once heard of a greek...umm..i guess you could call it a way of life? philosophy?..im not sure but it was "LOVE AND DEATH" ->>the two things we live to do is to love and to die.. im not sure if my source was credible or if this even makes sense in respect to greek philosophy....but i would love to have it translated & if possible..explained.. i really do appreciate the help..
Title: Re: love & death
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Mar, 2007, 08:25:35
You've opened the broadest possible topic, Cayla, and we can only begin to approach it here.  Usually the two (ΕΡΩΣ, love/desire and ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ, death) are juxtaposed as opposites.  For early Greek philosophers, eros was often conceived as the creative life force, the origin of all things, even of all gods.  For Aristotle, eros as "appetite" was the source of all movement in the universe.  For Freud, it was the force that sustained life as well as the health of the mind.
Thanatos promotes the opposite:  it is the negation of eros and of life itself.  Freud spoke of the Todestrieb, the "death drive" or "death instinct" that is responsible for neurosis, psychosis, and all self-destructive, life-negating behavior.  For a fascinating introductory read on all this, try Norman O. Brown's Life against Death, a psychoanalytical account of the interaction of eros and thanatos throughout history.  And watch this thread for further developments!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Connaki on 12 Mar, 2007, 13:17:29
What about Alexander the Great's quote: "Nothing is impossible to him who will try.."?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Mar, 2007, 15:28:04
What about Alexander the Great's quote: "Nothing is impossible to him who will try.."?
See, most recently, reply #698 (above).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Bedhead on 12 Mar, 2007, 22:42:10
Thanks alot for your help and suggestion I will look into getting it done in chinese, and yes its confucius. Thanks again.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Bedhead on 12 Mar, 2007, 23:46:16
I think I am kinda going over board with the extremely nice service you guys are doing for all of us, but i just cant help myself this is the only site i found that can give accurate ancient greek for different phrases/quotes. So the quotes or words I would like to have in ancient greek are, "unopposed"---Tacitus (nullo adversante?) and "Let them hate, as long as they fear"---Accius (Oderint dum metuat?) Thank you. 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 13 Mar, 2007, 03:07:13
So the quotes or words I would like to have in ancient greek are, "unopposed"---Tacitus (nullo adversante?) and "Let them hate, as long as they fear"---Accius (Oderint dum metuat?) . 
1.  OYΔΕΝΟΣ ΑΝΤΕΙΠΟΝΤΟΣ  οὐδενὸς ἀντειπόντος
2.  ΜΙΣΟΙΕΝ ΟΣΟΝΠΕΡ ΦΟΒΟΥΝΤΑΙ  μισοῖεν ὄσονπερ φοβοῦνται
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jglenis on 13 Mar, 2007, 04:24:02
Quote
"Give me a place to stand and I will move the earth"

Hello, about this sentence, I'd like to ask apart from translating it how you understand it. I see two options: 1. "Give me land/work and I will be able to make a change in this world," which could be attributed to Confucius and 2. "what Archimedes is reputed to have said when he discovered the lever." Let me add at this point that having asked a friend to look through some quotations by Confucius (in Traditional Chinese), there was nothing of the kind to be found. So, I wonder if after all it was Archimedes the person who said that. 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Mar, 2007, 04:56:31
John, the above saying is by Archimedes and has been translated. It's the other saying ("Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall") that is attributed to Confucius, though I haven't seen anything like it in his Analects.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: G0nZ0 on 13 Mar, 2007, 11:28:38
Hi all, Im looking for an acurate ancient greek translation for "ares god of war"

I hope you can help.

Thanks
:)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 13 Mar, 2007, 17:36:26
Hi all, Im looking for an acurate ancient greek translation for "ares god of war"
ΑΡΗΣ Ο ΘΕΟΣ ΤΟΥ ΠΟΛΕΜΟΥ
Lower case: Ἄρης ὁ θεὸς τοῦ πολέμου
Title: What we do in life/echoes in eternity.
Post by: -1398- on 13 Mar, 2007, 21:52:59
Ok first off I have to say this is going to help alot.  I've been wanting a tattoo for a while and finally decided on at least getting a phrase in greek.  I wish i could ask my grandmother how to translate this but she is against tattoo's altogether and wouldn't do it for me. Also I was considering splitting the phrase into two parts where the divider is, would it still read the same?  Again thank you!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jglenis on 13 Mar, 2007, 23:02:35
Quote
"Give me a place to stand and I will move the earth"

John, the above saying is by Archimedes and has been translated. It's the other saying ("Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall") that is attributed to Confucius, though I haven't seen anything like it in his Analects.

That would make indeed much more sense - also, I would agree with you that the other one you mention, attributed to Confucius, is not to be found in his Analects (in Chinese). Rather, online there is a literal translation (I was told) from English (我们最大的光荣并不在于永不跌倒,而在于每次跌倒后能起来) and a more idiomatic expression (人生的光荣,不在永不失败,而在能屡败屡起) that would translate: "the glory in life is not to be failure for ever but to rise every time we fall."
That is all, just for the record - I hope I didn't disorientate this very interesting indeed thread.
Title: Re: What we do in life/echoes in eternity.
Post by: billberg23 on 14 Mar, 2007, 06:26:18
I wish i could ask my grandmother how to translate this but she is against tattoo's altogether and wouldn't do it for me. Also I was considering splitting the phrase into two parts where the divider is, would it still read the same?
Looks like you've been bounced from English-Greek over here to ancient Greek, maybe only because you want a tattoo, and most tattoos want to be in ancient Greek.  But I have the impression that you'd prefer your grandmother's Greek to the Greek of your remote ancestors in antiquity. You've been patient, and I'll try to help you, though I'm only a pseudellenophone.  The true hellenophones will be quick to fix it if it's wrong ...

Ο,ΤΙ ΚΑΝΟΥΜΕ ΣΤΗ ΖΩΗ ΜΑΣ / ΑΝΤΗΧΕΙ ΣΤΗΝ ΑΙΩΝΙΟΤΗΤΑ
Lower case:  Ό,τι κάνουμε στη ζωή μας / αντηχεί στην αιωνιότητα

Yes, the divider works the same way with the Greek.
 
Title: Re: What we do in life/echoes in eternity.
Post by: wings on 14 Mar, 2007, 12:49:55
Ο,ΤΙ ΚΑΝΟΥΜΕ ΣΤΗ ΖΩΗ ΜΑΣ / ΑΝΤΗΧΕΙ ΣΤΗΝ ΑΙΩΝΙΟΤΗΤΑ
Lower case:  Ό,τι κάνουμε στη ζωή μας / αντηχεί στην αιωνιότητα

Yes, Bill. You are right. All tattoo questions are to be answered in this thread.

Your translation sounds fine to me.
Title: Re: What we do in life/echoes in eternity.
Post by: billberg23 on 14 Mar, 2007, 18:22:20
Yes, Bill. You are right. All tattoo questions are to be answered in this thread.

Your translation sounds fine to me.
Thanks, wings, for the info;  and for adding the accent to the O.  Live and learn!  I just hope 1398 can find his/her message in its new location.
Title: Re: What we do in life/echoes in eternity.
Post by: -1398- on 15 Mar, 2007, 05:47:47
Thanks, wings, for the info;  and for adding the accent to the O.  Live and learn!  I just hope 1398 can find his/her message in its new location.

I found it....thanks!
Title: Re: What we do in life/echoes in eternity.
Post by: wings on 15 Mar, 2007, 14:14:14
I found it....thanks!

Great!

Bill, usually members are automatically directed to the new thread. :-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: inky on 15 Mar, 2007, 18:04:52
Hello,

I have recently read a quote by Thucydides which has been translated as 'Happiness depends on being free, and freedom depends on being courageous'. I know that this is not a perfect translation however, so what would have been the equivalent? (does anyone know what text it is from?)

Many thanks :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 15 Mar, 2007, 18:30:27
@inky:

τὸ εὔδαιμον τὸ ἐλεύθερον, τὸ δ' ἐλεύθερον τὸ εὔψυχον



2.43.4.2
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: inky on 15 Mar, 2007, 18:39:01
fantastic, thanks for the swift reply :D
Title: My help is in the name of the Lord
Post by: James.Stahl on 15 Mar, 2007, 21:06:47
Could someone help me with this one.

My help is in the name of the Lord

thanks,
    James
 
Title: Re: My help is in the name of the Lord
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Mar, 2007, 22:01:34
My help is in the name of the Lord
Ἡ βοήθειά μου ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι τοῦ Κυρίου
Η BOHΘΕΙΑ ΜΟΥ ΕΝ ΤΩΙ ΟΝΟΜΑΤΙ ΤΟΥ ΚΥΡΙΟΥ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: James.Stahl on 15 Mar, 2007, 22:32:45
Oh Nice thank you very much.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tjcrazy on 16 Mar, 2007, 07:07:11
Hi, I was wondering if someone could help me with a translation.  It's pretty simple, I know, but I don't trust most of the free online translation websites out there.

"Will of Iron"

Thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Mar, 2007, 08:04:00
"Will of Iron"
The ancients didn't use exactly that metaphor.  Try ἀδαμάντινος προθυμία (ΑΔΑΜΑΝΤΙΝΟΣ ΠΡΟΘΥΜΙΑ) — literally "stubborn, unconquerable desire/zeal."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 16 Mar, 2007, 16:38:28
@tjcrazy: In this case, I would use the modern Greek phrase for this, and add a little ancient flavour to it:

σιδηρᾶ θέλησις

What do you think, Bill?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tjcrazy on 16 Mar, 2007, 17:20:00
How about "strength of many" ?

-tjcrazy
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Mar, 2007, 17:25:43
@tjcrazy: In this case, I would use the modern Greek phrase for this, and add a little ancient flavour to it:

σιδηρᾶ θέλησις

What do you think, Bill?
It's all Greek to me!  (-:
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Mar, 2007, 17:38:37
How about "strength of many" ?
ΠΟΛΛΩΝ ΣΘΕΝΟΣ
πολλῶν σθένος
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tjcrazy on 16 Mar, 2007, 17:42:12
would u have any recommendations for the correct pronunciations of:

πολλῶν σθένος

and

σιδηρᾶ θέλησις??

Wow you guys are great!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Mar, 2007, 18:38:18
would u have any recommendations for the correct pronunciations of:

πολλῶν σθένος

and

σιδηρᾶ θέλησις??
1)  po-lone  stheh-noss
2)  see-thee-rah (hard ththeh-lee-siss (soft th)

Accented syllables are in bold type.
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: yiannis on 17 Mar, 2007, 01:14:59
Can you please help me. I want to make a tattoo in honor of my late father and I want it to say something like - Always by my side or Always with me or Always in my heart. In greek of course. Any suggestions? Thank you in advance!
Title: Tattoo in honor of my father
Post by: yiannis on 17 Mar, 2007, 01:27:17
Please can you help me? I want to make a tattoo in greek in honor of my late father. I want it to say something like - Always by my side or Always with me or Always on my mind or Always in my heart. Do you have any suggestions of what sounds best and how to write it in greek? Thank you in advance!
Title: Re: Tattoo in honor of my father
Post by: skaratso on 17 Mar, 2007, 01:39:00
Please can you help me? I want to make a tattoo in greek in honor of my late father. I want it to say something like - Always by my side or Always with me or Always on my mind or Always in my heart. Do you have any suggestions of what sounds best and how to write it in greek? Thank you in advance!

Here are a few suggestions:

Always by my side = Πάντα δίπλα μου (Literally "Always next to me")

Always with me = Πάντα μαζί μου

Always on my mind = Πάντα στις σκέψεις μου (Literally "Always in my thoughts")

Always in my heart = Πάντα στην καρδιά μου
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: vanja on 17 Mar, 2007, 03:45:00
i would love to get a tattoo in greek , ("dont die wondering" )if anyone can translate this in greek that would be greatly appriciated
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 17 Mar, 2007, 06:20:40
i would love to get a tattoo in greek , ("dont die wondering" )if anyone can translate this in greek that would be greatly appriciated
Here's an attempt in ancient Greek:

ΜΗΔ' ΑΠΟΘΑΝΕΙΝ ΑΠΟΡΩΝ
μηδ' ἀποθανεῖν ἀπορῶν

If you prefer modern Greek, stay tuned...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wilkins5 on 17 Mar, 2007, 06:27:11
Nickel,
I would like to get a tattoo from Book VI of the Iliad, but I do not know which English words correspond to the original Greek. If you have time, could you please let me know the correct lines in Ancient Greek? Thanks very much for your help:

"I claim to be his son, and he sent me to Troy with strict instructions: Ever to excel, to do better than others, and to bring glory to your forebears, who indeed were very great ... This is my ancestry; this is the blood I am proud to inherit."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 17 Mar, 2007, 07:27:29
Nickel,
I would like to get a tattoo from Book VI of the Iliad, but I do not know which English words correspond to the original Greek. If you have time, could you please let me know the correct lines in Ancient Greek? Thanks very much for your help:

"I claim to be his son, and he sent me to Troy with strict instructions: Ever to excel, to do better than others, and to bring glory to your forebears, who indeed were very great ... This is my ancestry; this is the blood I am proud to inherit."

Iliad 6.206-11:

[Ἱππόλοχος δέ μ' ἔτικτε, καὶ] ἐκ τοῦ φημι γενέσθαι·
πέμπε δέ μ' ἐς Τροίην, καί μοι μάλα πόλλ' ἐπέτελλεν
αἰὲν ἀριστεύειν καὶ ὑπείροχον ἔμμεναι ἄλλων,
μηδὲ γένος πατέρων αἰσχυνέμεν, οἳ μέγ' ἄριστοι
[ἔν τ' Ἐφύρῃ] ἐγένοντο [καὶ ἐν Λυκίῃ εὐρείῃ].       
ταύτης τοι γενεῆς τε καὶ αἵματος εὔχομαι εἶναι.

(I've bracketed the words your translation left out.)  Let us know if we can help further!
Title: Spelling of tattoo
Post by: yiannis on 18 Mar, 2007, 19:55:11
Hi!
Can you help me with the following:
Se exo panta stin kardia mou

I need it in greek letters and with the right spelling and `tonos` for a tattoo. Thank you and euxaristo!
Title: Re: Spelling of tattoo
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Mar, 2007, 20:19:34
Σε έχω πάντα στην καρδιά μου
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: yiannis on 19 Mar, 2007, 16:00:24
Thank you so much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dbrasco444 on 19 Mar, 2007, 21:35:10
can anyone translate the spartan word "andreia" into greek letters?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Mar, 2007, 22:47:05
can anyone translate the spartan word "andreia" into greek letters?
The Spartans were very much Greeks, dbrasco444, so ΑΝΔΡΕΙΑ (lower case: ἀνδρεῖα), "manliness, courage, bravery," is very much a Greek word, and not exclusively Spartan.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: thinman on 20 Mar, 2007, 00:00:03
could someone translate this quote into modern greek for me
Death is the greatest of all human blessings ~ Socrates
thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Mar, 2007, 00:20:11
I think you mean this:

οἶδε μὲν γὰρ οὐδεὶς τὸν θάνατον οὐδ' εἰ τυγχάνει τῷ ἀνθρώπῳ πάντων μέγιστον ὂν τῶν ἀγαθῶν

No one knows whether death may not be the greatest of all blessings for a man.

Apology of Socrates (by Plato) 29.a.6
Title: Re: Strength and Honor
Post by: animosity on 20 Mar, 2007, 02:25:13
I haven't seen the film, so I don't know what they were supposed to have said there.  In real life, gladiatorial shows were mostly an Italian taste, so the gladiators spoke Latin, not Greek.  Usually they saluted whoever presided over the games (often the emperor himself), pronouncing the formula Morituri te salutamus ("We who are about to die salute you").
Be that as it may, the ancient Greek for "strength and honor" would be ΔΥΝΑΜΙΣ ΚΑΙ ΤΙΜΗ (lower case δύναμις καὶ τιμή).


Hi i was doing some research and i found another translation for "strength and honor" it shows "ΔΥΝΑΜΗ ΚΑΙ ΤΙΜΗ" I assume its incorrect? your expertise would be fantastic. thank you for your time
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Mar, 2007, 02:29:14
This slightly different translation is just the modern Greek version. It's only the ending that has changed.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: animosity on 20 Mar, 2007, 02:48:26
This slightly different translation is just the modern Greek version. It's only the ending that has changed.

Thank you so much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dbrasco444 on 20 Mar, 2007, 14:53:51
thank you billberg! I know the spartans were greek. I just know they had a different dialect and i wasnt sure if that word was wide spread. No disrespect.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dbrasco444 on 20 Mar, 2007, 15:07:34
I was also wondering how the phrase "No Fear" would translate in ancient Greek?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 20 Mar, 2007, 16:37:48
I was also wondering how the phrase "No Fear" would translate in ancient Greek?
ΘΑΡΣΕΙ (lower case θάρσει):  literally, "Fear not!"
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Mar, 2007, 16:53:04
In Theocritus we also find the phrase "Θαρσεῖν χρή" (i.e. one should not fear), which is also quite common in modern Greek.

I believe it is also in the emblem of the Greek marine corps.

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fhomepages.pathfinder.gr%2Feidikesdinameis%2Fimages%2Fmetalia%2Fsymbol3.jpg&hash=ccb2411186b228b08fa051d39b050377b6a026d9)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dbrasco444 on 20 Mar, 2007, 18:21:49
thanks alot everyone
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Helen of Troy on 21 Mar, 2007, 01:34:58
I'm looking for the translation for the following words:

Truth
Passionate
Independent
Strong

Does anyone know if the meanings would be changed if the letters ran vertical rather than horizontal?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 21 Mar, 2007, 02:09:24
I'm looking for the translation for the following words:

Truth
Passionate
Independent
Strong

Does anyone know if the meanings would be changed if the letters ran vertical rather than horizontal?
Truth = H AΛΗΘΕΙΑ   (ἡ ἀλήθεια)
Passionate = ΣΦΟΔΡΟΣ   (σφοδρός) ,  feminine  ΣΦΟΔΡΑ   (σφοδρά)
Independent = ΑΥΤΟΝΟΜΟΣ   (αὐτόνομος)
Strong = ΔΥΝΑΤΟΣ  (δυνατός)

Ι can't imagine the meanings changing if the words are written vertically.  The ancients didn't normally write vertically, however, unless they were composing acrostics.
Title: Psalms 118:8
Post by: jesskougl on 22 Mar, 2007, 18:37:09
I want "Psalms 118:8" (just the phrase, not the actual whole Bible verse) translated into ancient Greek for a tattoo. Help?
Title: Re: Psalms 118:8
Post by: billberg23 on 22 Mar, 2007, 20:51:02
I want "Psalms 118:8" (just the phrase, not the actual whole Bible verse) translated into ancient Greek for a tattoo. Help?
(Psalms 118:8 Septuagint): Ἀγαθὸν πεποιθέναι ἐπὶ κύριον ἢ πεποιθέναι ἐπ' ἄνθρωπον.
Title: Re: Psalms 118:8
Post by: banned8 on 22 Mar, 2007, 22:58:44
I want "Psalms 118:8" (just the phrase, not the actual whole Bible verse) translated into ancient Greek for a tattoo. Help?

Ψαλμοὶ ριη´:η´

Just joking :-)
Title: Re: Psalms 118:8
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Mar, 2007, 01:40:01
Ψαλμοὶ ριη´:η´

Just joking :-)
Oυψ, αυτό εννοεί, σοβαρά!  Δε μου κατέβηκε ποτέ!
Title: Re: Psalms 118:8
Post by: wings on 23 Mar, 2007, 12:13:59
Oυψ, αυτό εννοεί, σοβαρά!  Δε μου κατέβηκε ποτέ!

Χαχαχαχα... ούτε κι εγώ το είχα σκεφτεί. Μπράβο, Νίκο, άρχοντα των χαρακωμένων (παραμένω απλή πριγκίπισσα και με ρωτάνε σε προσωπικά μηνύματα πώς να χαρακωθούν - τούτος ο εφιάλτης ποτέ δεν θα περάσει).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ollyorb on 23 Mar, 2007, 14:30:37
Hi there!

I was wondering if you'd be able to translate something into Ancient Greek (lower case), for a potential tattoo, please?

"I did not ask for the life I was given, but it was given, none the less. And with it, I did my best."

Cheers!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Mar, 2007, 15:51:23
"I did not ask for the life I was given, but it was given, none the less. And with it, I did my best."
See Forum Rules (blue button at top of page):
1.5 If you ask for translation help please limit your query to 12 words and ALWAYS provide CONTEXT. If you want help with something bigger than that then you may contact one of the members or directly Translatum Translation Services for professional translation.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ollyorb on 24 Mar, 2007, 17:51:10
Hi there!

Sorry to bother you, but i'm really trying to find an accurate ancient greek translation (lower case), but the phrase is over 12 words long so I can't post it in the forum.  Does this mean i'm allowed to ask a member for help?  If so that'd be fantastic.

The phrase is:  "I did not ask for the life I was given, but it was given, none the less. And with it, I did my best."

The context is nothing in particular; I don't think it was ever said by anyone famous or anything, I just heard it on TV and really liked it!!  If you could help me out it would be much appreciated.

Many thanks.

Moderator's note: No problem with the number of the words. I promised ollyorb that we shall do our best to help.:-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 24 Mar, 2007, 21:59:42
The phrase is:  "I did not ask for the life I was given, but it was given, none the less. And with it, I did my best."
Ὃν μὲν βίον ἔδωκεν ὁ θεὸς οὐκ ᾐτήκη·  αὐτὸν δ’ ὅμως δοθέντα κατέζησα κατά δύναμιν.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ollyorb on 25 Mar, 2007, 14:46:00
Fantastic; thanks very much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Psyche on 28 Mar, 2007, 23:51:54
Hi there :)

I am new to the site and struggling to claim back the grasp I once had on Ancient Greek whilst I was at university!  I am hoping to have Socrates' words "wisdom beings in wonder" or "philosophy begins in wonder" if you prefer tattooed in Ancient Greek and I can't seem to get it quite right!

Please could someone translate this for me.

Thank you
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Mar, 2007, 02:33:24
I am hoping to have Socrates' words "wisdom beings in wonder" or "philosophy begins in wonder" if you prefer tattooed in Ancient Greek and I can't seem to get it quite right!
Please could someone translate this for me.
Socrates may have said that, Psyche, but I don't know if it was recorded.  In the meantime, we have Aristotle, Metaphysics A982b12:
Διὰ γὰρ τὸ θαυμάζειν οἱ ἄνθρωποι καὶ νῦν καὶ τὸ πρῶτον ἤρξαντο φιλοσοφεῖν.
"Νow as ever, it is through wonder that humans begin to love wisdom."
Title: I am what I am -> ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ ὤν / ἐγώ εἰμι ὅ, τι εἰμί
Post by: pepper_joan on 29 Mar, 2007, 03:00:36
Hi,

Please help me to translate this phase 'I am what i am' into ancient Greek because i enjoy Greek mythology so much. Thank you.
Title: Re: I am what i am
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Mar, 2007, 03:54:49
In the Septuagint (Exodus 3.14), when Moses asks God for his name, God answers, ΕΓΩ ΕΙΜΙ Ο ΩΝ  (ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ ὤν) — "I am who am."  Is this the quotation you had in mind?
Title: Re: I am what i am -> ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ ὤν
Post by: pepper_joan on 29 Mar, 2007, 18:32:47
Hi,

Thank you for answering. I'm sorry i didn't make myself clear. I am get this phase tattooed therefore what i need is literally ' I am what i am' in ancient Greek. The reason why i choose it in Greek is because i enjoy reading Greek mythology which has lots of strong characters that are admirable. Is there any difference from what you have translate?  Thank you for your trouble.
Title: Re: I am what I am -> ἐγώ εἰμι ὅ, τι εἰμί
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Mar, 2007, 20:08:17
Apparently you don't mean the biblical passage.  I'd suggest, then,
ΕΓΩ ΕΙΜΙ Ο, ΤΙ ΕΙΜΙ 
Lower case:  ἐγώ εἰμι ὅ, τι εἰμί
Title: Eternal Love
Post by: Troy on 31 Mar, 2007, 05:28:00
The words "Eternal" and "Love"

this is going to be a tattoo for someone and they asked me to get a translation of these 2 words. Thanks.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 31 Mar, 2007, 05:53:45
@Troy: Translations that have been offered in the past:

αἰωνία ἀγάπη

ἀθάνατος ἡ ἀγάπη


The second one means: Love (is) undying
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Gitane on 02 Apr, 2007, 13:28:49
Hi there, I would like to know if the greek word Thelema is the correct translation for 'willpower', and how this is translated in Greek letters, signs. Thank you so much already. I would very much love it to be in the lettertype used in the post above this one, so maybe you could help me Nickel?

Greetz

Gitane
Title: SPARTAN
Post by: Rottie on 02 Apr, 2007, 21:40:58
Can someone please translate SPARTAN into Greek for me? I need it to be done in capitals. Thank you
Title: Re: Need translation for "SPARTAN"
Post by: λinaπ on 02 Apr, 2007, 21:59:46
Do you want it to mean the man from Sparta? If this is the case, then the answer is ΣΠΑΡΤΙΑΤΗΣ
If the word is used to convey the character of the decoration or the meal or what have you, saying that it is spartan, then it is something else. Would you like to elaborate?
Title: Re: Need translation for "SPARTAN"
Post by: banned8 on 02 Apr, 2007, 22:33:39
See https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg54857#msg54857 (message 634)
Title: ambition & determination & courage
Post by: shesontheverge on 03 Apr, 2007, 09:28:08
Thanks!
Title: Re: ambition & determination & courage
Post by: wings on 03 Apr, 2007, 12:22:27
ambition = φιλοδοξία

determination = αποφασιστικότητα

courage = θάρρος, κουράγιο
Title: Re: ambition & determination & courage
Post by: shesontheverge on 04 Apr, 2007, 07:59:44
why are there 2 courages?
i want it as a tatoo so which would be best?
thank you.

Title: Re: ambition & determination & courage
Post by: billberg23 on 04 Apr, 2007, 08:34:44
They are synonyms, like "bravery" and "courage" in English.  But θάρρος goes back to ancient Greek, while κουράγιο is derived from the Romance languages (Italian/French).  Use either one, but if you prefer a less modern and more traditional Greek word, use θάρρος.
Title: chaos
Post by: shesontheverge on 04 Apr, 2007, 09:11:54
chaos.

thanks again.
Title: Re: chaos -> χάος
Post by: Evmorfia on 04 Apr, 2007, 10:51:47
χάος (all small)

Χάος (first letter capital)

ΧΑΟΣ (all capital)

Title: Foe of the Great Fear
Post by: timsailor on 05 Apr, 2007, 08:48:26
Wondering if anyone could give me a translation of this phrase for a tattoo I want to get. Thanks!
Title: Re: Foe of the Great Fear
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Apr, 2007, 09:45:58
TOY MEΓΑΛΟΥ ΦΟΒΟΥ ΕΧΘΡΟΣ
Lower case:  τοῦ μεγάλου φόβου ἐχθρός
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 05 Apr, 2007, 18:16:44
Hi Guys I need help to translate english to Ancient Greek for a tattoo. Please help, very much appreciated.

I'm not sure if there's a direct translation or a phrase that means the same in ancient greek. Can be all in caps or lower case.

Here's the phrase:
Always by my side, till death do us apart

Thanks much guys!
kim
Title: Re: Euripides Quotations
Post by: jerby1980 on 05 Apr, 2007, 18:52:59
First off, i would like to say how absolutely impressed i am with this site and how wonderful everyone is with their help.

I'm looking to get a few Euripides quotes translated into ancient greek, i haven't been able to come up with anything i feel 100% confident about.

1) No one who lives is error free

2) ...I sacrifice to no god save myself...

3) ...Fate is stronger than anything I have known

Thank you so much in advance.
Title: Re: Euripides Quotations
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Apr, 2007, 19:53:13
3) ...Fate is stronger than anything I have known
We'll start with the last and easiest.  The other two will surely follow, so stay tuned!
Euripides, Alcestis 965:  KΡΕΙΣΣΟΝ ΟΥΔΕΝ ΑΝΑΓΚΑΣ ΗΥΡΟΝ
                         Lower case:   κρεῖσσον οὐδὲν Ἀνάγκας ηὗρον
Title: Re: Euripides Quotations
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Apr, 2007, 20:34:19
2) ...I sacrifice to no god save myself...
Euripides, Cyclops 334:
ΑΓΩ ΟΥΤΙΝΙ ΘΥΩ ΠΛΗΝ ΕΜΟΙ, ΘΕΟΙΣΙ Δ'ΟΥ
Lower case:  ἁγὼ οὔτινι θύω πλὴν ἐμοί, θεοῖσι δ' οὔ

Two down, one to go!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 05 Apr, 2007, 20:47:29
Hey Billberg23,

can help me with my translation? your help is very much appreciated.

many thanks in advance
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: timsailor on 05 Apr, 2007, 21:07:41
Thanks Billberg! I really appreciate it.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Apr, 2007, 22:00:04
Always by my side, till death do us apart
ΠΑΡΙΣΤΑΣΘΑΙ ΜΟΙ ΔΙΑΠΑΝΤΟΣ, ΕΩΣ ΑΝ ΝΩΪ ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ ΔΙΑΙΡΗΙ
Lower case:  παρίστασθαί μοι διαπαντός, ἕως ἂν νῶϊ θάνατος διαιρῇ

Btw, Kim, the English is "till death do us part," = "till death parts us."
Title: Re: Euripides Quotations
Post by: Katerina Dimopoulou on 06 Apr, 2007, 09:19:42

1) No one who lives is error free


It seems that the quote is in fact No one who lives in error is free
(see http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/e/euripides.html for example)

The only lines I can find come from a fragment (fr. 1029.1-3) and read

οὐκ ἔστιν ἀρετῆς κτῆμα τιμιώτερον·
οὐ γὰρ πέφυκε δοῦλον οὔτε χρημάτων
οὔτ' εὐγενείας οὔτε θωπείας ὄχλου.

I will keep looking, though.
Title: ambition -> φιλοδοξία
Post by: shesontheverge on 06 Apr, 2007, 22:51:34
Could someone translate it in both lowercase and uppercase? (For a tat)?
Thankss!
Title: Re: ambition
Post by: billberg23 on 06 Apr, 2007, 23:53:09
Ambition:

ἡ φιλοδοξία

Η ΦΙΛΟΔΟΞΙΑ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Precept on 07 Apr, 2007, 02:04:35
Hi,

I've read through the first 50 pages of this thread and you guys are amazing people.  Thank you for taking the time out of your days to help the less educated.

I'm writing because I'm looking for a couple of tattoo ideas.  I've been considering getting the name Achilles in Greek lettering down my right flank (where the arm hangs).  Wiki has the translation as Ἀχιλλεύς.  I just wanted to verify that.

Also, I've been trying to find some kind of symbol that isn't too popularized.  I was born in Canada but spent most of my younger years in Kephalonia before I moved to Florida.  I'll most likely be the first in my family not to marry a Greek and I would like something to symbolize my ancestry.  Any help as far as symbols/sayings for the second tattoo would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

- Robert
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 07 Apr, 2007, 02:25:03
Ἀχιλλεὺς

is correct. Let us now think of a good symbol.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Precept on 07 Apr, 2007, 07:53:25
Thanks for the confirmation.  Anyone have ideas about the symbol/saying?

- Robert
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 07 Apr, 2007, 09:22:04
I'll most likely be the first in my family not to marry a Greek and I would like something to symbolize my ancestry.  Any help as far as symbols/sayings for the second tattoo would be appreciated.
How about a lion or a lion's head, Robert, with the inscription ἕνα ἀλλὰ λέοντα — from Aesop's fable about the lioness who, when asked how many cubs she bears, responds, "Just one, but it's a lion."
(In caps that's ΕΝΑ ΑΛΛΑ ΛΕΟΝΤΑ.)
Title: Re: ambition -> φιλοδοξία
Post by: shesontheverge on 07 Apr, 2007, 09:32:01
would this be in modern or ancient greek?
Title: Re: ambition -> φιλοδοξία
Post by: wings on 07 Apr, 2007, 13:01:16
would this be in modern or ancient greek?

It is the same word for both Ancient and Modern Greek.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wolfy1985 on 08 Apr, 2007, 17:47:42
Hello I wanted to get a tattoo saying "Pain last eons but eternity is peaceful."
I was hoping to get it in the phoenician language but I wasnt sure if it was too rudimentary to be able to spell out that sentence.
I checked an english to ancient greek online translator and it said it would be λεξικό δεν βρήκε καμία λέξη but I wasnt sure which era (Im sure it isnt phoenician) it was from and I wanted to double check the spelling.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 08 Apr, 2007, 18:32:59
ΠΑΡΙΣΤΑΣΘΑΙ ΜΟΙ ΔΙΑΠΑΝΤΟΣ, ΕΩΣ ΑΝ ΝΩΪ ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ ΔΙΑΙΡΗΙ
Lower case:  παρίστασθαί μοι διαπαντός, ἕως ἂν νῶϊ θάνατος διαιρῇ

Btw, Kim, the English is "till death do us part," = "till death parts us."


Hi Billberg23,

Thanks for helping out with the translation. And for correcting the phrase, didn't realise I wrote the phrase wrongly. ha

After looking at the translation, I realise the phrase is so long, not sure if my arms can fit those words if I tattoo it. If there another alternative for the phrase. If not, I will just go with "Till death do us part" Any advice?

One last request, possible to jpg the phrase for me so I can print it out and give the tattoo artists to stencil it. A nice beautiful greek font will do. Bold or Regular if you have it.

Thank you so much.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Apr, 2007, 18:58:28
ΠΑΡΙΣΤΑΣΘΑΙ ΜΟΙ ΔΙΑΠΑΝΤΟΣ, ΕΩΣ ΑΝ ΝΩΪ ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ ΔΙΑΙΡΗΙ
Lower case:  παρίστασθαί μοι διαπαντός, ἕως ἂν νῶϊ θάνατος διαιρῇ
One last request, possible to jpg the phrase for me so I can print it out and give the tattoo artists to stencil it. A nice beautiful greek font will do. Bold or Regular if you have it.
You could always put παρίστασθαί μοι διαπαντός on one arm, and ἕως ἂν νῶϊ θάνατος διαιρῇ on the other!
As for the JPG, we'll have to see if the Fontmaster has the time...

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Apr, 2007, 19:52:25
Hello I wanted to get a tattoo saying "Pain last eons but eternity is peaceful."
I was hoping to get it in the phoenician language but I wasnt sure if it was too rudimentary to be able to spell out that sentence.
I checked an english to ancient greek online translator and it said it would be λεξικό δεν βρήκε καμία λέξη but I wasnt sure which era (Im sure it isnt phoenician) it was from and I wanted to double check the spelling.
ΠΟΛΥΧΡΟΝΙΟΣ ΜΕΝ Η ΤΟΥ ΠΑΡΟΝΤΟΣ ΟΔΥΝΗ, ΜΟΝΙΜΟΣ Δ' Η ΤΟΥ ΑΙΩΝΙΟΥ ΕΙΡΗΝΗ
Lower case:  πολυχρόνιος μὲν ἡ τοῦ παρόντος ὀδύνη, μόνιμος δ΄ ἡ τοῦ αἰωνίου είρήνη
I tried to adjust the sentence to Hellenic modes of thought, so that it more or less reads,"Present pain lasts a very long time, but eternal peace is forever."

Phoenician?  That's a tall order, finding someone to compose with the alphabet, vocabulary, and grammar of an ancient West Semitic language! Dr. Moshe might bring it off, however.   :-)
Btw, your λεξικό δεν βρήκε καμία λέξη means "The dictionary didn't find any word."
That would have made an impressive tattoo!  :-))))
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 08 Apr, 2007, 23:49:54
@kim

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg267.imageshack.us%2Fimg267%2F3076%2Fdouspartle1.jpg&hash=4cad553f53a38c9a4d57fbde99d30c003f339db4)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wolfy1985 on 09 Apr, 2007, 03:47:50
Hahaha good thing Im not impulsive when it comes to tattoos.
Thanks for the input.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Precept on 09 Apr, 2007, 04:32:08
How about a lion or a lion's head, Robert, with the inscription ἕνα ἀλλὰ λέοντα — from Aesop's fable about the lioness who, when asked how many cubs she bears, responds, "Just one, but it's a lion."
(In caps that's ΕΝΑ ΑΛΛΑ ΛΕΟΝΤΑ.)

This is a really good idea; the more I think about it the more I like it.  Any other thoughts alonge these lines?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 09 Apr, 2007, 10:07:49
You could always put παρίστασθαί μοι διαπαντός on one arm, and ἕως ἂν νῶϊ θάνατος διαιρῇ on the other!
As for the JPG, we'll have to see if the Fontmaster has the time...[/quot]


Yeah i was thinking of putting παρίστασθαί μοι διαπαντός on one arm, and ἕως ἂν νῶϊ θάνατος διαιρῇ on the other. But the font will have to be very small to squeeze all those words in. I think I will see what the tattoo artists can do. Will post you a pic once I have that tattooed on my arms.

Thanks so much! you have been great help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 09 Apr, 2007, 10:32:01
@kim

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg267.imageshack.us%2Fimg267%2F3076%2Fdouspartle1.jpg&hash=4cad553f53a38c9a4d57fbde99d30c003f339db4)

Hi Nickel,

Thanks so much for the jpg! Love both caps and lower case!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: axltijuca on 09 Apr, 2007, 20:02:03
Hi Everyone, Im intending to do a Tattoo with the Spartan Shield, I know that the translation of Sparta is Σπάρτη, but I wanto to write down it "Spartan" or "Warrior From Sparta", in Acient Greek (Attic)

Ive asked some friends and i´ve found a couple of translations:

1- πολεμιστής της Σπάρτης
2- Λακεδαιμόνιος
3- Σπαρτιάτης

which of them is correct? What´s the diference?

Heres the Sample of the Tattoo: http://img161.imageshack.us/img161/8391/spartaix8.jpg

Thanks for your help :),

Regards,

Ugo Oliveira - Brazil
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 09 Apr, 2007, 20:34:09
Hi Everyone, Im intending to do a Tattoo with the Spartan Shield, I know that the translation of Sparta is Σπάρτη, but I wanto to write down it "Spartan" or "Warrior From Sparta", in Acient Greek (Attic)

Ive asked some friends and i´ve found a couple of translations:

1- πολεμιστής της Σπάρτης
2- Λακεδαιμόνιος
3- Σπαρτιάτης

which of them is correct? What´s the diference?
eira - Brazil
Especially since you already have a Λ on your shield, I'd go with Λακεδαιμόνιος.  It was what the Spartans called themselves, and it signalled that they were members of a warrior nation which had subdued all of Lacedaemon.
Σπαρτιάτης signified anyone (and everyone) who lived in the city called Sparta, slave or free.  It meant nothing special.
And I doubt that any warror from Sparta would have called himself πολεμιστής (ἐκ) της Σπάρτης; it was enough to call himself Λακεδαιμόνιος.
Hope that helps! 
 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: axltijuca on 10 Apr, 2007, 19:48:53
billberg23,

I think you´re right λακεδαιμονιος is the best word for my tattoo,

thanks, but Im affraid i´ve made a mistake, the Ancient language of the Spartans are Greek Doric, not Attic... (Attic is from Atens)....

How is λακεδαιμονιος in Doric?

thanks again
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Apr, 2007, 20:19:37
thanks, but Im affraid i´ve made a mistake, the Ancient language of the Spartans are Greek Doric, not Attic... (Attic is from Atens)....
How is λακεδαιμονιος in Doric?
Same thing.  Attic and Doric are dialects of the same language (Greek), not different languages. Many words were pronounced the same in both dialects. Like New Englanders and Texans, they could make fun of one another's dialect, but they certainly had no problem understanding one another.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Gitane on 12 Apr, 2007, 17:41:54
Hello everyone,

I really enjoy this forum. It's so great to have all this knowledge shared!
For a long time i have been looking for quotes concerning 'willpower' or 'strength of will'. But since i am not introduced in the ancient literature i don't know where to start looking. I would especially like quotes from Greek literature concerning willpower or detemination or control of the self or something. I do study philosphy, but i have no knowledge of Greek (i know it is a sin) or overview of Greek literature. Does anyone know any good quotes/lines on this subject?
I really really appreciate your help!!

Greetz

Gitane
 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 13 Apr, 2007, 19:47:57
For a long time i have been looking for quotes concerning 'willpower' or 'strength of will'. I would especially like quotes from Greek literature concerning willpower or detemination or control of the self or something. Does anyone know any good quotes/lines on this subject?
Good question, Gitane!  The difficulty is that the ancient Greeks had no concept of “will power” as we conceive it in modern times, or even of “will.”  To Quote from Bruno Snell (The Discovery of the Mind: The Greek Origins of European Τhought, Harvard 1953): 
   But the will … is a notion foreign to the Greeks;  they do not
even have a word for it.  Thelein means “to be ready, to be
prepared for something.”  Boulesthai  is “to view something as
(more) desirable.”  The former denotes a subjective
preparedness, a kind of voluntary attitude devoid of specific
commitment;  the latter refers to a wish or plan (boule) aimed
at a particular object, i.e. a disposition closely related to the
understanding and appreciation of a gain.  But neither word
expresses a realization of the will, the effective inclination of
subject toward object.

For a long time after Homer, the mind was a twofold thing:  the “seeing” mind (nous) and the (e)motive mind (thymos).  What we interpret as the power of the “will” was more often seen by the Greeks as the action of some divine force (daimonion) upon the thymos , moving it toward some object, whether for good or ill.

Even in Homer, however, it is possible for nous  to dominate thymos,  and there, Gitane, we can locate the other concept you bring up, that of “self control.”  In the first book of the Iliad, Athena orders Achilles to put up the sword he has drawn in anger, by bidding him σὺ δ’ ἴσχεο, πείθεο δ’ ἡμῖν (“But you, control yourself, obey us [gods]”).

The most famous expression of self-control was in the second Delphic precept, inscribed in the temple of Apollo at Delphi:  MHΔΕΝ ΑΓΑΝ, “Nothing too much,” of equal rank with the other maxim,  ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ, “Know yourself.”  Self-knowledge and self-control were associated concepts.  According to Heraclitus (fr. 116), Ἀνθρώποισι πᾶσι μέτεστι γινώσκειν ἑωυτοὺς καὶ σωφρονεῖν, “It is given to all humans to know themselves and to control themselves” — again, mind over emotion, nous over thymos.  In Plato’s Gorgias 491d10, Socrates defines the superior man as σώφρονα ὄντα καὶ ἐγκρατῆ αὐτὸν ἑαυτοῦ, τῶν ἡδονῶν καὶ ἐπιθυμιῶν ἄρχοντα τῶν ἐν ἑαυτῷ, “self-controlled and in possession of himself, governing the pleasures and passions within himself.”

Self-control was famously summed up in the noun sophrosyne.  As Socrates notices in Plato’s Symposium 196c4, εἶναι γὰρ ὁμολογεῖται σωφροσύνη τὸ κρατεῖν ἡδονῶν καὶ ἐπιθυμιῶν, “for it is agreed that sophrosyne is the controlling of pleasures and passions.”

There, Gitane.  And perhaps others on the Forum can contribute other famous instances of sophrosyne  in Greek literature.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jack597 on 15 Apr, 2007, 01:25:38
Hey all,
Just recently stumbled on this site and it is outstanding!!  I am getting a tattoo and want to incorporate my kids names into the design.  I want their names to be written in Greek.  Could someone provide me with the Greek writing for Alexandra and for Christopher.  Could you also provide the names in caps and lower case.  One last request, is it possible to jpg the names for me so I can print out and give to my tattoo artist to stencil.  Thank you for all of your help. 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 15 Apr, 2007, 01:34:18
Hi, Jack. Here's your JPG, as requested. Mind you, I have given Κρίστοφερ as a transliteration of the English name, and Χριστόφορος as the Greek version of the name (i.e. bearer of Christ) from which the English is derived.

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg131.imageshack.us%2Fimg131%2F8436%2Facxb5.jpg&hash=406a44cbb2e5b5e6d1441f2fde18a1bacfd36877)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jack597 on 15 Apr, 2007, 02:53:18
Nickel,
Thank you so much for the fast response.  Just so I understand you correctly, the English name of Christopher translated in greek starts with the K, however someone who is 100 percent greek and was given the name Christoher would spell the name with the X.  Sorry if this question sounds stupid, I just want to make sure I understand you correctly before I get the tattoo work done.  I want to make sure I use the correct version for my son's name.  Thank you again for your guidance.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 15 Apr, 2007, 03:05:30
You have understood correctly: in Greek Christ is Χριστός, hence the Greek for the bearer of Christ starts with an X. The English pronunciation of Christ starts with a "k" sound, therefore the Greek transliteration of the English name Christopher starts with a "K". Thus, Christopher Reeve is Κρίστοφερ in Greek, but Saint Christopher or King Christopher of Denmark is Χριστόφορος (Khristophoros).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jack597 on 15 Apr, 2007, 18:22:02
Nickel,
Thanks again you have been a great help.  I have one more request if you would indulge me.  Could you translate the following words in upper and lower case and provide them via jpg:

strength
inner strength

I really appreciate all of your assistance.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 16 Apr, 2007, 14:40:00
I can only give you the modern Greek for that, Jack. I don't know if the ancients had a different way of putting it.

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg142.imageshack.us%2Fimg142%2F7656%2Finnerpowerlf7.jpg&hash=b64bc0002c9f69b67ac64b42500951d6a7333a84)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Apr, 2007, 19:41:48
strength
inner strength
For a literal translation of the concept, Jack, we should go with nickel's suggestion.  To an ancient Greek, it wouldn't have made much sense to distinguish "strength," "inner strength," and "outer strength."  For "inner strength," the best we can do in ancient Greek is probably KAPTEPIA (="steadfastness").  And for simple strength, ΔΥΝΑΜΙΣ or ΣΘΕΝΟΣ.
[Lower case:  καρτερία, δύναμις, σθένος.]
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jack597 on 17 Apr, 2007, 05:48:19
Nickel and Billberg,
Thank you so much for your guidance and assistance.  I only wish that I could return the favor  somehow.  Like others who have posted on this site, I am 100 percent Greek however growing up I really didn't take the time to appreciate my heritage.  Both of my papou's were from Sparta.  Now I'm 39 years old and I am considering getting a tattoo, something I never thought I would do.  I want to get something that pays homage to my roots, and also incorporates the name of my two children Alexandra and Christopher.  I will post a pic of my tattoo when it is completed.  This forum is the best.

Thank you again,
Chris
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: hmwayte on 17 Apr, 2007, 19:35:09
Hi! You helped me out last month with the text for my tattoo and I promised a photo once I'd had it done, so here you are:

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi20.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fb239%2Fhannahw2%2FIMG_0006-3.jpg&hash=45b334ec25380b149fc1644068433465b68668cf)

It's not a very clear photo - the lettering is nowhere near as thick as it appears but I can't manage to take a photo with one hand without blurring it hehe. Thanks a lot for your help (=
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Apr, 2007, 19:55:45
Good job! And thanks for keeping your promise.
Title: R.I.P. Daddy
Post by: Kamelen on 18 Apr, 2007, 05:09:38
this is for a tattoo. the r.i.p.  as in Rest In Peace
Title: With Love -> ἀγαπητός
Post by: Kamelen on 18 Apr, 2007, 05:10:35
with love translated into ancient greek
Title: I Miss and Love You Dad -> Σὲ ποθῶ τε καὶ στέργω, πάτερ
Post by: Kamelen on 18 Apr, 2007, 05:11:27
" I Miss and Love You Dad" to ancient greek
Title: Forever With Me in My Heart -> Ἀεὶ παρ' ἐμοὶ ἐν καρδίᾳ
Post by: Kamelen on 18 Apr, 2007, 05:12:16
"Forever With ME in My Heart" to ancient Greek
Title: Re: R.I.P. Daddy
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Apr, 2007, 06:26:40
First, please accept our sincere condolences on your loss.
"Requiescat in pace" (R.I.P.) probably has a kindred expression in the Orthodox church.  Until someone informs us of a Greek equivalent, here is an almost literal interpretation in ancient Greek:
Ἀναπαύου, ἄππα, ἐν εἰρήνῃ
Title: Re: Forever With Me in My Heart
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Apr, 2007, 07:00:27
Ἀεὶ παρ' ἐμοὶ ἐν καρδίᾳ
Title: Re: I Miss and Love You Dad
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Apr, 2007, 07:08:06
Σὲ ποθῶ τε καὶ στέργω, πάτερ
Title: Re: With Love
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Apr, 2007, 07:38:46
Αncient Greek wouldn't have put it just that way.  It may be better to render the thought as ἡ ἀγάπη μου ("my love") or ἀγαπητός ("beloved," i.e., your father).
Title: help for a tattoo
Post by: InHocSignoVinces on 18 Apr, 2007, 11:00:24
Hey all,

I was hoping to find some help for a translation for a tattoo I am wanting to get. I would like to get a couple of things translated if you could help me out.

the first one I would like is "God is Love" the phrase which appears in 1 John 4:8. I have a translation of it already, but I am not all together confident that it is correct.

the second word I would like translated is the word "humble" or "humility" again a Biblical allusion from the teaching of Jesus in Matthew and the apostle Paul's writings to the Church at Ephesus.

If I could get some feedback on this that would be awesome.

-IHSV
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: treandafilia on 18 Apr, 2007, 11:36:45
1 John 4:8

ο μη αγαπών ουκ έγνω τον Θεόν, ότι ο Θεός αγάπη εστίν (New Testament Greek)

whoever is without love does not know God, for God is love.

humble = ταπεινός (masculine version of adjective), humility = ταπεινότητα (Modern Greek)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Apr, 2007, 16:44:30
humble = ταπεινός (masculine version of adjective), humility = ταπεινότητα (Modern Greek)
And ancient Greek is almost the same.  Humble = ταπεινός masculine, ταπεινή feminine.
Humility = ἡ ταπεινότης.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 18 Apr, 2007, 17:26:22
ΠΑΡΙΣΤΑΣΘΑΙ ΜΟΙ ΔΙΑΠΑΝΤΟΣ, ΕΩΣ ΑΝ ΝΩΪ ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ ΔΙΑΙΡΗΙ
Lower case:  παρίστασθαί μοι διαπαντός, ?ως ?ν ν?ϊ θάνατος διαιρ?

Btw, Kim, the English is "till death do us part," = "till death parts us."

Hi Billberg23,

I was going throught the forum, and i found another translation for "Always by my side". Is quite different from what you translated for me.

Always by my side = Πάντα δίπλα μου (Literally "Always next to me")

I'm totally clueless about greek words. Just need to clarify and make sure before i ink it on my arm.
Sorry for the trouble.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Apr, 2007, 17:37:16
Hi Billberg23,
I was going throught the forum, and i found another translation for "Always by my side". Is quite different from what you translated for me.

Always by my side = Πάντα δίπλα μου (Literally "Always next to me")

I'm totally clueless about greek words. Just need to clarify and make sure before i ink it on my arm.
Sorry for the trouble.
No trouble at all, Kim.  Πάντα δίπλα μου is modern Greek, and you had asked for ancient Greek.
Title: Thanks
Post by: InHocSignoVinces on 19 Apr, 2007, 07:52:01
Treandafilia and Billberg,

Thanks so much for your input. The translation I had for God is love was the same that you gave Trea.

And ancient Greek is almost the same.  Humble = ταπεινός masculine, ταπεινή feminine.
Humility = ἡ ταπεινότης.

Was the last translation you gave for Humility be most like what is found in the New Testament?

-IHSV
Title: Re: Thanks
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Apr, 2007, 08:37:51
Was the last translation you gave for Humility be most like what is found in the New Testament?
Yes indeed.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: harrypoli on 20 Apr, 2007, 16:47:00
Hi There,

My first post, and I'd like to thank you for a great forum and your kind help. There are a small number of saying which I would like to have translated into a gif image in the Lithos Pro font if possible so I can compare how they look side by side. Quotes are are follows and your help is greatly appreciated.

Οὐδὲν τοῖς θαρροῦσιν ἀνάλωτον
οὐδέν ἀδύνατον
γνῶθι σαυτόν
μηδέν ἄγαν
ΔΟΣ ΜΟΙ ΠΑ ΣΤΩ ΚΑΙ ΤΑΝ ΓΑΝ ΚΙΝΑΣΩ

Regards
Harry
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Apr, 2007, 17:07:50
I hope you realize that Lithos is an upper-case font, like ancient Greek writing.

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg156.imageshack.us%2Fimg156%2F2522%2Fgreekphrdl7.jpg&hash=f019d516f88cee733e9fb1be71644a249cef0d6a)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: harrypoli on 20 Apr, 2007, 17:19:04
Nickel,

That was incredibly quick. Thank you. I understand it is uppercase and I think it's a fantastic looking font. As long as the meaning of the quote remains intact this is the font I prefer.

Now the challenge will be for a Greek Australian currently living in Shanghai China to find a reputable tattoo artist!

Thank you again
Harry
Title: Hiya
Post by: nicolettaninos on 20 Apr, 2007, 18:16:21
Hi everyone,

I'm new here so I thought I would introduce myself.

I'm Nicoletta Ninos, I was born in Corfu but now live in Scotland. I go back to family in Corfu as often as I can.

I'm here really because I am looking to get some tattoos in Greek.


Nicoletta



Live - Love - Laugh





Title: Re: Hiya
Post by: user10 on 20 Apr, 2007, 18:23:34
Hi Nicoletta, welcome to our forum :)

Since you are interested in having these words translated for a tatto, take a look at this thread:

Tattos and Ancient Greek (https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.855.html)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nicolettaninos on 20 Apr, 2007, 20:05:57
Thank you very much.

Title: Re: Hiya
Post by: billberg23 on 20 Apr, 2007, 21:21:53
Live - Love - Laugh
I'm pretty sure you'd like this in the living Greek of today, right, Nicoletta?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jack597 on 21 Apr, 2007, 00:17:41
Hello Nickel,
You recently provided me with the names of my two children (Alexandra & Christopher) in Greek as well as the transliteration of the word strength.  I took what you provided me along with a design to a tattoo artist.  He wanted to know if you could provide me with the font file from which you created these words.  Is that possible to do?  If so, could you please e-mail the file to me at jack597@earthlink.net.  Please forgive my ignorance as I am not that well versed with computers, so if this request is to demanding, please let me know.  Thank you again for all of your help, it is greatly appreciated. 

Chris
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 21 Apr, 2007, 00:26:36
@jack:

The font used for the names etc. was Candara, one of the fonts that now come with Windows Vista, I believe. You can find it as part of the zip file uploaded here (http://alexx.ltd.ee/fonts/6_New_ClearType_Fonts_Longhorn.zip). If you have any problems downloading or using the file, let me know.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jenna_lynn34 on 21 Apr, 2007, 04:42:32
Is it possible for me to put multiple items on here and get them translated?  I need like a poem and different phrases for a few tattoos...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 21 Apr, 2007, 06:41:47
Is it possible for me to put multiple items on here and get them translated?  I need like a poem and different phrases for a few tattoos...
Each phrase gets a different post, Jenna.  We won't charge you extra!
And the poem should be less than 12 words.
If you're uncertain about any of this, hit the "Rules" button (top of page).  Later ~
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jack597 on 21 Apr, 2007, 17:27:01
Nickel,
Please forgive me, but how does one take that font file you sent and create the the words you provided to me in Greek.  I believe the tattoo artist wants to play with the words so they will fit better around the design I provided to him.  Thanks again for your help. 

Chris
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 21 Apr, 2007, 17:34:48
If you download the file and unzip it, you have four Candara?.ttf fonts. You use Control Panel > Fonts to add the fonts to the system (provided it's a PC, not a Mac). Once the files are there, you need to copy-paste the Greek text into Word or an illustration program like CorelDraw, format it as Candara and play around with it to your heart's content.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jack597 on 21 Apr, 2007, 21:43:56
Nickel,
Thanks for your help and quick response.  I will keep you posted.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jack597 on 22 Apr, 2007, 03:34:53
Nickel,
Thanks to you, I was able to transfer those fonts to Word.  I couldn't transfer the names and the word strength because it was a jpg file and transfered as picture.  I was able to transfer my sons name, Christopher, because you wrote it in addition to the jpg you provided.  Could you please provide with me Alexandra and strength in your usual text so I can copies those as well.  The fonts on the Word program work great.  Thanks again.

Chris
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 22 Apr, 2007, 03:41:12
Silly me. I forgot I'd only given you the JPG. Here are the names for copy-paste:

Αλεξάνδρα
ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΑ
Κρίστοφερ
ΚΡΙΣΤΟΦΕΡ
Χριστόφορος
ΧΡΙΣΤΟΦΟΡΟΣ

δύναμη
ΔΥΝΑΜΗ
εσωτερική δύναμη
ΕΣΩΤΕΡΙΚΗ ΔΥΝΑΜΗ
καρτερία
ΚΑΡΤΕΡΙΑ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jack597 on 22 Apr, 2007, 03:43:27
Wow, Nickel that was fast.  Thank you so much.  Will keep you posted. 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: 479lead on 23 Apr, 2007, 09:29:50
I've been having some trouble finding an ancient Greek translation of "unashamed".  The AG dictionaries I've reviewed online only have "ashamed" but not the negative "unashamed".  Any help?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nicolettaninos on 23 Apr, 2007, 12:29:21
Morning all,

I would like it in modern Greek and old Greek please.

I really would like "What goes around comes around" but I do not know how this would be worded in Greek.

What would my name "Nicoletta Marula Ninos" look like in Greek.

Thank you for your help.


Nicoletta
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: gretch on 23 Apr, 2007, 12:39:57
Hello,

Would someone please be so kind as to translate the phrase "learn and teach" into ancient Greek for me, for a tattoo that I want? Are there multiple ways to translate this? If so would you please explain the different nuances?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Apr, 2007, 15:12:37
I've been having some trouble finding an ancient Greek translation of "unashamed". 
You probably want to avoid the word for "shameless," which is ἀναίσχυντος.
If you want to say something like "unembarrassed," I'd go for οὐκ αἰσχυνόμενος, feminine οὐκ αἰσχυνομένη (= "not ashamed").
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Apr, 2007, 15:49:14
I would like it in modern Greek and old Greek please.
I really would like "What goes around comes around."
What would my name "Nicoletta Marula Ninos" look like in Greek.
Dear Νικολέτα Μανούλα Νίνος (a beautiful name in either language!),
An ancient Greek could have said something like ἃ κακῶς ποιεῖς ἀποβαίνει εἰς τὸ σὸν βάρος — "the ill you do comes back to your own sorrow."

As for modern Greek, let's wait and hear from others ...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned13 on 23 Apr, 2007, 16:01:41
I think that Nicoletta Marula Ninos would rather be
"Νικολέττα Μαρούλα Νίνου" in Greek, don't you agree, Bill?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Apr, 2007, 16:05:46
Would someone please be so kind as to translate the phrase "learn and teach" into ancient Greek for me, for a tattoo that I want? Are there multiple ways to translate this? If so would you please explain the different nuances?
Probably the most natural way to say this in Greek is μάνθανε διδάσκουσα ("keep learning while teaching," using the feminine form of the participle), though you could also translate your phrase literally as μάνθανε καὶ δίδασκε ("keep learning and teaching").
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Apr, 2007, 16:12:54
I think that Nicoletta Marula Ninos would rather be
"Νικολέττα Μαρούλα Νίνου" in Greek, don't you agree, Bill?
Sorry, Alexandra, I'd forgotten that feminine last names stand in the genitive, not nominative!  And hadn't known that "Nicoletta" would be spelled with two "taus" in Greek.
Now, if you could just suggest something modern for "What goes around comes around" ...  (-:
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 23 Apr, 2007, 16:19:03
Νικολέτα or Νικολέττα. You will find either. In transliterating foreign names, you would normally drop the second 't'. But there are also lots of Greek Nicolettas who spell their name with one 't'. So, up to Nicoletta to choose which she'd like better.

Also: Νίνου in Greek, Νίνος in transliteration, as in Νία Βαρδάλος.
Modern Greek for "What goes around comes around": Έχει ο καιρός γυρίσματα.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nicolettaninos on 23 Apr, 2007, 16:22:10
Thank you so much for your help.

I think my name looks beautiful in Greek....thank you so much again.

Have a great day.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: 479lead on 23 Apr, 2007, 19:34:54
You probably want to avoid the word for "shameless," which is ἀναίσχυντος.
If you want to say something like "unembarrassed," I'd go for οὐκ αἰσχυνόμενος, feminine οὐκ αἰσχυνομένη (= "not ashamed").
That sounds like what I would want.  The context that I am referencing it to is Romans 1:16 (For I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ).

Would your translation fit this context?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Apr, 2007, 20:22:23
That sounds like what I would want.  The context that I am referencing it to is Romans 1:16 (For I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ).
Would your translation fit this context?
Wish you had mentioned that context from the first.  In the original Greek there, (Rom.1.16) you find the single verb ἐπαισχύνομαι, "I am ashamed of," preceded by the word οὐ, "not."
But again, the verb is built on the noun αἴσχος, "shame."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Calliope2206 on 24 Apr, 2007, 11:12:50
Hi

I am of Greek descent and would like to get my first name as a Tattoo as it is the english version of my Yaya's name (i am Calliope and she is Kalliopi) i was given a translation for my name in modern Greek but was wondering if it is any different in Ancient Greek Text

If someone could send me a note on what it would look like would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 24 Apr, 2007, 12:10:57
Hi

I am of Greek descent and would like to get my first name as a Tattoo as it is the english version of my Yaya's name (i am Calliope and she is Kalliopi) i was given a translation for my name in modern Greek but was wondering if it is any different in Ancient Greek Text

If someone could send me a note on what it would look like would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Καλλιόπη

Your name was exactly the same in Ancient Greek, too. :-)
Title: Everything has beauty but not everyone sees it
Post by: nicolettaninos on 24 Apr, 2007, 18:32:07
Would you be so kind as to translate the following into modern and old Greek. I am aware that the words may differ.

"Everything has beauty but not everyone sees it"

and

"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder"



Thank you
Title: Re: Everything has beauty but not everyone sees it
Post by: billberg23 on 24 Apr, 2007, 19:54:08
Would you be so kind as to translate the following into modern and old Greek. I am aware that the words may differ.

"Everything has beauty but not everyone sees it"

and

"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder"
Ancient Greek:

"Everything has beauty but not everyone sees it"

ἐν πᾶσι κάλλος, ἀλλ’ οὺ πᾶς τις τοῦτο καθορᾷ.
(Literally:  There is beauty in all things, but not everyone beholds it.)

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”

Πᾶν χρῆμα ὁ μὲν ἐφορᾷ καλόν, ὁ δ΄ οὔ.
(Literally:  Every thing looks beautiful to one person, but not to another.)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 25 Apr, 2007, 07:49:19
No trouble at all, Kim.  Πάντα δίπλα μου is modern Greek, and you had asked for ancient Greek.

Oh that explained why is different. Thanks for the enlightenment. Modern Greek sentences seems shorter compared to the ancient greek that you helped me translated. In that case, need a last favour. Can help me translate the phrase again in Modern Greek as well. "Always by my side, Till death do us part."

One more request for the FontMaster. Can also please help me with the fonts, I need a jpg image for the tattoo artist to stencil it. Preferable a few type fonts, Garamond (bold), Trebuchet and Gentium, all lower caps will do.

Thanks a bunch guys!

Title: Pillar of Fire/Pillar of Faith
Post by: Dipsomniac on 25 Apr, 2007, 09:52:07
Hello, I'm new to the forums, and I joined specifically so I could get some help with these two phrases. The reason that I'm looking to get the translations for these phrases are for a couple tattoos I want to get. The reason behind the tattoo is a long and unimportant story (to anyone but me anyways) at this point. :D
Anyways, I'm wondering what the Ancient Greek translations of these phrases are. Any help with this would be greatly greatly greatly greatly appreciated. Thank you!
Title: Re: Pillar of Fire/Pillar of Faith
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Apr, 2007, 16:01:14
@ Dipsomniac:

Pillar of fire = ΣΤΥΛΟΣ ΠΥΡΟΣ  στῦλος πυρός (Exodus 14.24).

So pillar of faith = ΣΤΥΛΟΣ ΠΙΣΤΕΩΣ  στῦλος πίστεως.
Title: Re: Everything has beauty but not everyone sees it
Post by: nicolettaninos on 25 Apr, 2007, 17:12:02
Thank you again for all your help.

Till next time.
Title: Re: Everything has beauty but not everyone sees it
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Apr, 2007, 19:42:20
Would you be so kind as to translate the following into modern and old Greek. "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder"
Finally, Nicoletta, modern Greek: Η ομορφιά βρίσκεται μόνο στο βλέμμα του παρατηρητή. [Thanks for the help, Elena!]

Quote
Live - Love - Laugh
Να ζεις, ν' αγαπάς, να γελάς.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Dipsomniac on 26 Apr, 2007, 00:21:45
@billberg 23

Thank you so much. I couldn't find any online resource (besides this forum) that would give me and accurate translation. I found a parallel Greek and English Bible, but I didn't know which words were which since I don't speak Greek. I suppose that's obvious.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: m076750 on 27 Apr, 2007, 01:09:28
I was trying to get the phrase "Self-pity is for the Weak" translated but I can't find any matches for self-pity in any online ancient greek dictionary.

Thanks,

Tyler
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Apr, 2007, 03:00:21
I was trying to get the phrase "Self-pity is for the Weak" translated but I can't find any matches for self-pity in any online ancient greek dictionary.
Οἰκτείρουσιν δ' ἑαυτοὺς μόνον οἱ ἀδύνατοι is the best I can do, Tyler (literally, "Only the weak feel pity for themselves").  Someone else may come up with something better.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: vango on 28 Apr, 2007, 12:15:59
Hey, i would like to get the words "love", "hate", "beginning" and "end" translated..
I don´t mean "agaph", "misos", "arxi" " and "telos",  i need the ancient translation..

thanks :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 28 Apr, 2007, 12:33:34
Hey, i would like to get the words "love", "hate", "beginning" and "end" translated..
I don´t mean "agaph", "misos", "arxi" " and "telos",  i need the ancient translation..
Do you mean, "I need the words in the original Greek"?  If so, here they are, in upper and lower case:
AΓΑΠΗ  ἀγάπη 
ΜΙΣΟΣ  μῖσος
ΑΡΧΗ  ἀρχή
ΤΕΛΟΣ  τέλος
By the way, the words are the same in both ancient and modern Greek!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: vango on 28 Apr, 2007, 12:50:12
Hmm, the words are not the same in ancient and modern greek! (not really) :)

I found something interesting...

Take a look at

http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/efts/Woodhouse/

...

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 28 Apr, 2007, 13:21:31
Hmm, the words are not the same in ancient and modern greek! (not really) :)
We're struggling to grasp your point, Vango.  Did we misunderstand your request?  For example, did you want the verbs for "love," and "hate," rather than the nouns (which we gave you)?
Thanks for the link to the 1910 Woodhouse dictionary.  For those who understand how to use such a dictionary (and who understand terms like "substantive"), it will be useful.   
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 28 Apr, 2007, 13:38:57
I suppose Vango wants words like έρως or φιλώ for 'love' (αγάπη being the 'Christian' word). But, Vango, I don't understand the problem you have otherwise. Woodhouse does provide a number of translations and synonyms, but μίσος, αρχή and τέλος are there, and are words still in use with the same meaning.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: vango on 28 Apr, 2007, 14:19:23
Nickel, i found Woodhouse a couple of minutes after my first post.
I don´t have a problem anymore, thank you :)

Billberg, i´ll thank you, too inspite of your (i guess..) ironic comment...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: maridith22 on 28 Apr, 2007, 16:13:19
Hi everyone,
I was wondering if someone could help me with the ancient greek for the word "doula."  It is for a tattoo.  =]  Thank you very much.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 28 Apr, 2007, 16:56:59
I was wondering if someone could help me with the ancient greek for the word "doula."
Is it a proper name, or do you mean the Greek word for (female) slave (δούλη), or do you simply want d-o-u-l-a (whatever it means) spelled in Greek (ΔΟΥΛΑ)?
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Hendrix on 28 Apr, 2007, 23:24:54
Hi,
I'm a chef and would like to get a tattoo of a quote by Socrates on food.  I would really appreciate help in the translation.

"Bad men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good men eat and drink that they may live."
-- Socrates
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Apr, 2007, 17:12:08
"Bad men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good men eat and drink that they may live."
This saying is attributed to Socrates by [pseudo-]Plutarch, in the fourth chapter of a quaint little work entitled "How a Young Man Ought to Hear Poems" (in the second book of the Moralia).
I don't have the Greek text.  Whoever does, will gratify the hearts of billberg23 and Hendrix!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 30 Apr, 2007, 04:19:59
Sorry, I had missed this one:

In the original it says:

ὑπομνηστέον ὅτι Σωκράτης τοὐναντίον ἔλεγε, τοὺς μὲν φαύλους ζῆν τοῦ ἐσθίειν καὶ πίνειν ἕνεκα, τοὺς δ' ἀγαθοὺς ἐσθίειν καὶ πίνειν ἕνεκα τοῦ ζῆν


So I suppose, for brevity's sake:

οἱ μὲν φαῦλοι ζῆν τοῦ ἐσθίειν καὶ πίνειν ἕνεκα, οἱ δ' ἀγαθοὶ ἐσθίειν καὶ πίνειν ἕνεκα τοῦ ζῆν
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek - Names
Post by: nicolettaninos on 30 Apr, 2007, 12:47:43
Good Morning,

Can someone please translate the following names into Greek for me?

Derek

Elenni (with 2 n's)

Deacon

Kallissa (with 2 l's & 2 s's)

Xchyler


Many Thanks in advance
Title: Greek Orthodox Cross
Post by: nicolettaninos on 30 Apr, 2007, 14:16:36
Is this the Greek Orthodox Cross?

http://hometown.aol.co.uk/fatherluke/images/orthodox%20cross(2).jpg

Thanks
Title: Re: Greek Orthodox Cross
Post by: banned8 on 30 Apr, 2007, 14:46:41
Is this the Greek Orthodox Cross?

http://hometown.aol.co.uk/fatherluke/images/orthodox%20cross(2).jpg

It's actually the cross of the Russian Orthodox Church.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nicolettaninos on 30 Apr, 2007, 15:09:19
Ohh right...thank you.

Everytime i do a google search for greek orthodox cross thats what comes up...i shall keep looking.

Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 30 Apr, 2007, 15:12:13
Lots of crosses to choose from are here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross

The cross with the slanted bar appears there as the cross of the Eastern Orthodox church. Also here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Orthodox_Church
So you may have hit the nail on the head (oops!). I just think it is more familiar in Russian churches.
Title: The Iron code
Post by: Michael on 30 Apr, 2007, 17:49:13
Hey can i please get this translated into ancient greek. I want to get a tattoo of it.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 30 Apr, 2007, 18:49:15
ΟΙ ΣΙΔΗΡΕΟΙ ΘΕΣΜΟΙ
Lower case:  οἱ σιδήρεοι θεσμοί

(Assuming you mean "the iron-clad code of laws.")
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nicolettaninos on 30 Apr, 2007, 19:38:20
Can someone please translate the following names into Greek for me?

Derek

Elenni (with 2 n's)

Deacon

Kallissa (with 2 l's & 2 s's)

Xchyler


Many Thanks in advance
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 01 May, 2007, 02:39:58
Can someone please translate the following names into Greek for me?

Derek

Elenni (with 2 n's)

Deacon

Kallissa (with 2 l's & 2 s's)

Xchyler
Nicoletta, do you want each name to be written so that it will be pronounced (in modern Greek) more or less exactly the way it's pronounced in English?

Second question:  can you give us some idea of how Xchyler pronounces his/her name (e.g., "First syllable sounds like ...")?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nicolettaninos on 01 May, 2007, 08:52:27
Both the way it would be in Greek or English if that is ok.

Xchyler is Skyler just spelt different.

Hope this helps.

Thanks

Title: Greek Orthodox Crosses
Post by: nicolettaninos on 01 May, 2007, 11:53:47
Nickel thank you for your help re greek orthodox crosses.

Can you offer some more help as I am unsure of which cross to use.

http://www.londonbaystationery.com/Images/cross_fleurie.jpg

http://www.gallerybyzantium.com/store/graphics/00000001/1210AF.gif

All help appreciated.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 01 May, 2007, 13:11:04
Oh that explained why is different. Thanks for the enlightenment. Modern Greek sentences seems shorter compared to the ancient greek that you helped me translated. In that case, need a last favour. Can help me translate the phrase again in Modern Greek as well. "Always by my side, Till death do us part."

One more request for the FontMaster. Can also please help me with the fonts, I need a jpg image for the tattoo artist to stencil it. Preferable a few type fonts, Garamond (bold), Trebuchet and Gentium, all lower caps will do.

Thanks a bunch guys!




Hi Bill And Fontmaster,

Can help me translate the phrase again in Modern Greek as well. "Always by my side, Till death do us part." Think you guys might have overlooked it...

Thanks a bunch!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: F_idάνι on 01 May, 2007, 13:22:33
Nickel thank you for your help re greek orthodox crosses.

Can you offer some more help as I am unsure of which cross to use.

http://www.londonbaystationery.com/Images/cross_fleurie.jpg

http://www.gallerybyzantium.com/store/graphics/00000001/1210AF.gif

All help appreciated.


I so much like the second cross! Especially because of the inscription, meaning LIGHT (=ΦΩΣ) and LIFE (=ΖΩΗ). I am not really sure as to what exactly you are looking for, but I can assure you that it definitely looks greek and orthodox to me :-) Well, anyway, Byzantine, but still very familiar.

Also, as my uncle is an orthodox priest, I can assure you that I have never seen the first kind of cross in his home. Maybe they have that in their vestments or in items used in Mass, but, as I said, nothing more than that.

However, in religious ceremonies the christian cross is used (as in the Wikipedia's first article that Nickel has quoted) or even the Patriarchal one, only that the smaller crossbar might be slightly slanted, often bearing the inscription IN BI (an acronym of the phrase ''Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews'' in greek). The Byzantine cross of the Eastern Orthodox church (from Nickel's first Wikipedia link) is also quite common, only not so elaborated (yes, that's right, like the one in the second Nickel's link).

That being said, my personal opinion would be that if you are looking for a meaningful piece of jewlry, and not anything too explicit in historical or religious terms, go for the second option of yours. Good luck :-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 01 May, 2007, 14:26:19
Both the way it would be in Greek or English if that is ok.

Xchyler is Skyler just spelt different.
O.K., here's a cautious attempt at the names.  The true hellenophones will surely admonish me if I've gone astray:

Derek:  Ντέρεκ

Elenni (with 2 n's):  Ελέννι or Ελένη (Hellenized)

Deacon:  Ντήκον or Διάκονος (Hellenized)

Kallissa (with 2 l's & 2 s's):  Καλλίσσα

Xchyler:  Σκάιλερ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 01 May, 2007, 14:37:56
Ντέρεκ and Σκάιλερ are fine transliterations of American names. Ελέννι would look strange, so I suggest you go for Ελένη. Ντήκον is also a good transliteration, while Διάκονος (the Greek word from which we got the Latin diaconus and the English deacon) would be used as an ecclesiastical title, but not as a name. Καλλίσσα is unusual but there is at least one person on the web by that name.

Re the crosses: I too like the second one. Not that I didn't like the Russian cross.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 01 May, 2007, 15:01:54
Kim, you're right, I'd forgotten. Click on the image link for the Modern Greek version of "Always by my side, Till death do us part."

Image Link (http://img361.imageshack.us/img361/5782/tilldeathdouspartsz0.jpg)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 01 May, 2007, 15:12:28
Kim, you're right, I'd forgotten. Click on the image link for the Modern Greek version of "Always by my side, Till death do us part."

Hi Nick,

Once again you are brilliant! Thanks much for the translation and the fonts. You guys rock! Thanks a million!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nicolettaninos on 01 May, 2007, 17:52:55
Thank you so much.......I like the 2nd cross also...thank you all for your help!

I am looking for a very religious cross as a tattoo. Would the 2nd one still be your choice?

Derek:  Ντέρεκ (I thought that Derek started with a Triangle)?

Sorry if i am being silly.


Thanks

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 01 May, 2007, 18:08:47
I am looking for a very religious cross as a tattoo. Would the 2nd one still be your choice?

I'm neither religious nor in favour of tattoos, so I'm not the right person to ask. I like the Russian cross as a symbol because of the slanted line. But that's a purely artistic whim.

Derek:  Ντέρεκ (I thought that Derek started with a Triangle)?

We no longer transliterate foreign names changing the D to a Greek delta (Δ). Dante is Δάντης but Dante Gabriel Rossetti is Ντάντε and Derek is Ντέρεκ. Δέρεκ would now be the transliteration of Therek ('th' as in this and that).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: F_idάνι on 01 May, 2007, 18:52:35
Well, the notion ''very religious'' is something complicated, so I am not quite sure as to which one would be better. I know that the actual religious symbol is the one with the one (or two) slanted lines, and I also know that both the text and the font in your second choice qualify as ''very religious''.

Besides, an equally important factor would be the coloring. I liked the second one partly because of the gold. If your tattoo is going to be a black-and-white one, the cross with the slanted lines would probably look better.
But, still, this is just a personal opinion, I could be wrong.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 01 May, 2007, 19:00:16
[waxing philosophical]Allow me this philosophical interpolation: Isn't "religious" what we make of something? How something makes us feel? Rather than what others consider religious for themselves?[/waxing philosophical]
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nicolettaninos on 02 May, 2007, 09:56:45
I totally agree with you, however as my family have many crosses within there homes in Corfu i was confused as to which one would be the most "religious" even though what you say id so true......religion is what we make it.


Thanks again

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dougvlachos on 03 May, 2007, 10:37:58
hey guys,
   i need some help with a tattoo please and thanks, im getting my grandfathers name on myself and i want it in greek lettering, his name is Pericles Vlachos can you translate it with caps and small case. is there a big differnce in ancient and modern?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: λinaπ on 03 May, 2007, 12:34:18
hey guys,
   i need some help with a tattoo please and thanks, im getting my grandfathers name on myself and i want it in Greek lettering, his name is Pericles Vlachos can you translate it with caps and small case. is there a big difference in ancient and modern?

Hey yourself Doug!

Your grandfather's name in Greek looks like this:  Περικλής Βλάχος

In ancient Greek it would all be in capital letters, like this ΠΕΡΙΚΛΗΣ ΒΛΑΧΟΣ though if you want it in archaic letters maybe someone could oblige, as I don't have this font on my office computer - otherwise I can let you have it later today

Added by the fontmaster:
(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg209.imageshack.us%2Fimg209%2F6774%2Fpericlesjz9.jpg&hash=299d31de1ddaa6ff679e1d395a54e5ccaa3a659f)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Michael on 03 May, 2007, 13:15:11
ΟΙ ΣΙΔΗΡΕΟΙ ΘΕΣΜΟΙ
Lower case:  οἱ σιδήρεοι θεσμοί

(Assuming you mean "the iron-clad code of laws.")

Cheers for the help. I read a book which said the spartans followed the iron code or warriors code sounded like a cool idea for a tattoo. Would it still be written the same?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 03 May, 2007, 17:07:04
Cheers for the help. I read a book which said the spartans followed the iron code or warriors code sounded like a cool idea for a tattoo. Would it still be written the same?
Ah, if you're talking about Spartans, you should use their word for law, ῥήτρα, which referred to the binding decrees and laws of their kings.  So

σιδηρέα ῥήτρα  (ΣΙΔΗΡΕΑ ΡΗΤΡΑ)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Michael on 03 May, 2007, 18:44:05
Ah, if you're talking about Spartans, you should use their word for law, ῥήτρα, which referred to the binding decrees and laws of their kings.  So

σιδηρέα ῥήτρα  (ΣΙΔΗΡΕΑ ΡΗΤΡΑ)

Hey cheers mate thats awesome I can finally get my tat.
Cheers bud.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dougvlachos on 04 May, 2007, 00:14:40
hey linap,
 thank you very much now i can get my tattoo remebering my grand father. but if you could show me some of those fonts you where talking about it would be a great help. it would give me some great ideas.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: λinaπ on 04 May, 2007, 13:11:47
hey linap,
 thank you very much now i can get my tattoo remebering my grand father. but if you could show me some of those fonts you where talking about it would be a great help. it would give me some great ideas.

Hi again, Doug,

If you go back to my original reply, you will see your grandad's name in the archaic font I told you of,
added by the fontmaster

Cheers!

@ Nickel: Thanks, oh fontmaster!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: peasy_jp on 05 May, 2007, 01:55:22
Hi all, Ive been in love with this Socrates quote for quite a few years now and am ready to have it tattooed onto myself. I would like to get the translation as I think it would make the tattoo a little more unique.

the quote is:
Let him that would move the world, first move himself

Thanks for your help

Justin
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 05 May, 2007, 03:00:20
Hi, Justin.

The web is filled with paraphrases of what the ancients said, sometimes even of made-up quotations. I can’t place this one, and some web pages even attribute it to Aristotle or Sophocles or Seneca. And you won't get any more information out of them.

A quick search at www.ellopos.net (especially Plato's works (http://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/ancient-greece/plato-homepage.asp)) was of no help. The saying sounds suspiciously close to the saying attributed to Archimedes by Pappus of Alexandria: Give me a place to stand on and I will move the earth (but he was talking of levers).

In Phaedrus (245.d.7), Socrates says (I have removed irrelevant words):

κινήσεως ἀρχὴ τὸ αὐτὸ αὑτὸ κινοῦν

The self-moving is the beginning of motion

You can read the entire passage here:

http://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/ancient-greece/plato/plato-phaedrus.asp

I’m afraid this is the best I can do. Let's see if the classicists here have any better ideas.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 06 May, 2007, 11:21:31
Kim, you're right, I'd forgotten. Click on the image link for the Modern Greek version of "Always by my side, Till death do us part."

Hi Nick,

Once again you are brilliant! Thanks much for the translation and the fonts. You guys rock! Thanks a million!

Hey Nick,

Finally we got the tattoo done! how do i post the photo?
Thanks much!

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 May, 2007, 16:39:36
Finally we got the tattoo done! how do i post the photo?
Thanks much!

On posting photos:

You go to: http://imageshack.us/
Browse for the photo in the appropriate folder of your hard disk
Then press host it!
Once it is uploaded, choose the very last link suggested by the site.

Start a message here, press the third icon at the bottom row and paste the link from imageshack inside the img /img codes.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: TS on 07 May, 2007, 04:35:11
Hi all,

Really sorry if this has beenasked already but have gone through most of the forum and searched but couldn't find it.

I'm looking for a translation of "Only the dead have seen the end of the war" which is often atributed to Plato but I am not sure which dialogue it is from and have struggled to find it.

I'd like to get it in Ancient/Attic greek and if anyone could give me a jpg that would be great.

Again apologiesif it is has already comeup.

Thanks in advance. TS
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 07 May, 2007, 04:44:48
Please have a look at the article here (http://plato-dialogues.org/faq/faq008.htm).

After some of my own research, I tend to agree with the author's conclusions.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: TS on 07 May, 2007, 04:54:08
Thanks nickel. I just read that article  - still no real conclusion. Could it be paraphrased from something else?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 07 May, 2007, 15:30:35
Could it be paraphrased from something else?

Not that I know of. I searched translations of Plato's works and none of these notions (not the exact phrasing) brought up anything of interest.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kim on 07 May, 2007, 18:22:00
On posting photos:

You go to: http://imageshack.us/
Browse for the photo in the appropriate folder of your hard disk
Then press host it!
Once it is uploaded, choose the very last link suggested by the site.

Start a message here, press the third icon at the bottom row and paste the link from imageshack inside the img /img codes.

Great thks! heres the photo!

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg517.imageshack.us%2Fimg517%2F9137%2Fkimswallowslowresvq8.th.jpg&hash=a385fe26f6fb3ff42c65b5f613e0de0a11600155) (http://img517.imageshack.us/my.php?image=kimswallowslowresvq8.jpg)

http://img517.imageshack.us/img517/9137/kimswallowslowresvq8.jpg

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg338.imageshack.us%2Fimg338%2F2349%2Fmissytattolowresjz9.th.jpg&hash=2835dec124cef105d22847842585ac943e1bbc5e) (http://img338.imageshack.us/my.php?image=missytattolowresjz9.jpg)

http://img338.imageshack.us/img338/2349/missytattolowresjz9.jpg
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 07 May, 2007, 18:34:39
Well done! And the artwork is great too.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: janvergil89 on 08 May, 2007, 06:51:39
hello? what's up?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: janvergil89 on 08 May, 2007, 07:01:57
hello there? anybody who could help me to find a good phrase or quote that refers to a promise of everlasting love
for a girlfriend? well, i'm just planning to have our engagement ring
and i want to put some inscriptions on it.. i preffered greek, hehehehehe...please anybody out there please help me... i am looking forward to your reply.. thank you
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: peasy_jp on 08 May, 2007, 08:27:34
Hi, Justin.

The web is filled with paraphrases of what the ancients said, sometimes even of made-up quotations. I can’t place this one, and some web pages even attribute it to Aristotle or Sophocles or Seneca. And you won't get any more information out of them.

A quick search at www.ellopos.net (especially Plato's works (http://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/ancient-greece/plato-homepage.asp)) was of no help. The saying sounds suspiciously close to the saying attributed to Archimedes by Pappus of Alexandria: Give me a place to stand on and I will move the earth (but he was talking of levers).

In Phaedrus (245.d.7), Socrates says (I have removed irrelevant words):

κινήσεως ἀρχὴ τὸ αὐτὸ αὑτὸ κινοῦν

The self-moving is the beginning of motion

You can read the entire passage here:

http://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/ancient-greece/plato/plato-phaedrus.asp

I’m afraid this is the best I can do. Let's see if the classicists here have any better ideas.


thank you for your help.

I first saw the quote 4 or 5 years ago while i was in college, and to this point I too have been unsuccessful in attributing it directly to Socrates. In my research i have noticed that a lot of the classical phrases are actually paraphrases or even completely fictitious. what you have found however seems to be pretty close. In the beginning of my research i saw that there seems to be a lot of ambiguity concerning what the ancient texts say and what modern translators can make it say. therefore it seems reasonable to me that what you have found is probably the root of the quote i presented.

once again, thank you for your help

Justin
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 May, 2007, 18:45:19
hello there? anybody who could help me to find a good phrase or quote that refers to a promise of everlasting love
Σήματ' ἀριφραδέα κατέλεξας εὐνῆς ἡμετέρης.

"You have given clear tokens of our marriage (bed)." ~ Odyssey 23.225f. Spoken by Penelope when she has recognized Odysseus through his description of the bed he had built (one leg of it an olive tree still rooted in the ground).

It's all I can come up with at the moment, Jan.  I'm hoping others will contribute better suggestions.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: arete on 08 May, 2007, 22:53:42
The word arete (excellence) is very easy to find translated into the Classical Greek alphabet in computer fonts; however, I am searching for someone who can produce the word in beautiful calligraphy.  Anyone out there with any references or ideas?  Thanks for your time.

Title: What doesn't kill us makes us stronger
Post by: kerryarron on 09 May, 2007, 15:17:58
Could someone please tell me how to write that in Greek? It's for a tattoo......

Also, how do you say - confident and intelligent?
Title: Re: What doesn't kill us makes us stronger
Post by: NadiaF on 09 May, 2007, 15:20:50
Ό,τι δεν μας σκοτώνει, μας κάνει πιο δυνατούς.

For the rest (and for confirmation of the above) you will have to wait for the experts

Title: Re: What doesn't kill us makes us stronger
Post by: billberg23 on 09 May, 2007, 16:32:52
Ό,τι δεν μας σκοτώνει, μας κάνει πιο δυνατούς.
Yes, that's a beautiful translation into modern Greek!

Or, if Kerry prefers Nietzsche's original German, it's

Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mich stärker.
Title: Watch over me
Post by: kerryarron on 09 May, 2007, 23:13:38
I want to get a tattoo in memory of my dad, and I want to say something like 'Dad, watch over me', or perhaps 'forever in my heart' - or any better suggestions you can come up with!

Thanks :D
Title: Re: Watch over me
Post by: billberg23 on 09 May, 2007, 23:54:58
I want to get a tattoo in memory of my dad, and I want to say something like 'Dad, watch over me', or perhaps 'forever in my heart' - or any better suggestions you can come up with!
For the moment, Kerry, have a look at this page:
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.840.html
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jkruleader on 10 May, 2007, 03:34:04
I really want to get a phrase in ancient greek within a banner around my cross tattoo.  I was thinking about "agape," but actually in greek of course (ancient).  "True Agape" would be better if at all possible.   Thank You So Much!
Title: Re: What doesn't kill us makes us stronger
Post by: billberg23 on 10 May, 2007, 08:27:00
Also, how do you say - confident and intelligent?
βέβαιος και νοήμων
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 May, 2007, 08:35:46
I really want to get a phrase in ancient greek within a banner around my cross tattoo.  I was thinking about "agape," but actually in greek of course (ancient).  "True Agape" would be better if at all possible.   Thank You So Much!
True love = ἀληθινὴ ἀγάπη             ΑΛΗΘΙΝΗ ΑΓΑΠΗ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: michelle on 10 May, 2007, 09:49:54
Hey im looking to get a tattoo in modern greek that says something like - Courage, Love and Happiness, would someone be able 2 translate that for me? or does anyone have any ideas of words along those lines that would look good? id appreciate any suggestions.
you have a great site going here, very helpful. thanks so much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: λinaπ on 10 May, 2007, 10:47:01
Hi Michelle,

The words you require, are as follows:

Θάρρος, Αγάπη, Ευτυχία

Hope this helps!
Title: Re: Forever With Me in My Heart
Post by: kerryarron on 10 May, 2007, 13:25:16
So does
πάτερ
Ἀεὶ παρ' ἐμοὶ ἐν καρδίᾳ
mean ' Dad, forever with me in my heart? How do I change it to say Dad, forever in my heart?
Sorry if I seem slow to reply, but I am still trying to get my head around the forum!


Title: Re: Forever With Me in My Heart
Post by: wings on 10 May, 2007, 13:29:04
So does
πάτερ
Ἀεὶ παρ' ἐμοὶ ἐν καρδίᾳ
mean ' Dad, forever with me in my heart? How do I change it to say Dad, forever in my heart?
Sorry if I seem slow to reply, but I am still trying to get my head around the forum!


Hi, there!

No need to change anything - there is no difference in Ancient Greek for either meaning you want.
Title: Re: Forever With Me in My Heart
Post by: billberg23 on 10 May, 2007, 16:25:04
How do I change it to say Dad, forever in my heart?
Or, if you need fewer words, you can write
Πάτερ, ἀεὶ ἐν καρδίᾳ μου
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kerryarron on 13 May, 2007, 00:56:09
How do you say:
Love hurts?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 13 May, 2007, 01:18:14
How do you say:
Love hurts?
Ancient or modern Greek?
The ancients actually spoke of the γλυκύπικρον ἔρωτος βέλος, the "bittersweet arrow of love."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Gitane on 14 May, 2007, 22:37:58
Good question, Gitane!  The difficulty is that the ancient Greeks had no concept of “will power” as we conceive it in modern times, or even of “will.”  To Quote from Bruno Snell (The Discovery of the Mind: The Greek Origins of European Τhought, Harvard 1953): 
   But the will … is a notion foreign to the Greeks;  they do not
even have a word for it.  Thelein means “to be ready, to be
prepared for something.”  Boulesthai  is “to view something as
(more) desirable.”  The former denotes a subjective
preparedness, a kind of voluntary attitude devoid of specific
commitment;  the latter refers to a wish or plan (boule) aimed
at a particular object, i.e. a disposition closely related to the
understanding and appreciation of a gain.  But neither word
expresses a realization of the will, the effective inclination of
subject toward object.

For a long time after Homer, the mind was a twofold thing:  the “seeing” mind (nous) and the (e)motive mind (thymos).  What we interpret as the power of the “will” was more often seen by the Greeks as the action of some divine force (daimonion) upon the thymos , moving it toward some object, whether for good or ill.

Even in Homer, however, it is possible for nous  to dominate thymos,  and there, Gitane, we can locate the other concept you bring up, that of “self control.”  In the first book of the Iliad, Athena orders Achilles to put up the sword he has drawn in anger, by bidding him σὺ δ’ ἴσχεο, πείθεο δ’ ἡμῖν (“But you, control yourself, obey us [gods]”).

The most famous expression of self-control was in the second Delphic precept, inscribed in the temple of Apollo at Delphi:  MHΔΕΝ ΑΓΑΝ, “Nothing too much,” of equal rank with the other maxim,  ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ, “Know yourself.”  Self-knowledge and self-control were associated concepts.  According to Heraclitus (fr. 116), Ἀνθρώποισι πᾶσι μέτεστι γινώσκειν ἑωυτοὺς καὶ σωφρονεῖν, “It is given to all humans to know themselves and to control themselves” — again, mind over emotion, nous over thymos.  In Plato’s Gorgias 491d10, Socrates defines the superior man as σώφρονα ὄντα καὶ ἐγκρατῆ αὐτὸν ἑαυτοῦ, τῶν ἡδονῶν καὶ ἐπιθυμιῶν ἄρχοντα τῶν ἐν ἑαυτῷ, “self-controlled and in possession of himself, governing the pleasures and passions within himself.”

Self-control was famously summed up in the noun sophrosyne.  As Socrates notices in Plato’s Symposium 196c4, εἶναι γὰρ ὁμολογεῖται σωφροσύνη τὸ κρατεῖν ἡδονῶν καὶ ἐπιθυμιῶν, “for it is agreed that sophrosyne is the controlling of pleasures and passions.”

There, Gitane.  And perhaps others on the Forum can contribute other famous instances of sophrosyne  in Greek literature.


Hi billberg23!! First of all i have to say i am really sorry that it took so long to say thank you!!! Thank you so very much for your reply!!! It's is very very clear and it has made me so excited to go read all the literature from the authors you mentioned. Really beautiful quotes you gave me there!! I've been having problems with my computer so that's the reason why it took me so long to reply. But i'm glad to be back here! Again thank you so very very much!!!

Greetz

Gitane
Title: he who has no fear of god
Post by: Tal-C on 16 May, 2007, 17:13:33
hey there, users and moderators!

i've been lurking the site and forum for some time now, and i kinda got carried away with the language! i think im gonna take a greek course next semester... it has nothing to do with what im studying (engineering), but i've come to greatly fond this language!

anyway, the phrase im in need of translation is "he who has no fear of god". i've found all the words already, but i had no idea how to connect them grammatically.

great site, and thanks in advance for any help offered!
Tal.
Title: Re: he who has no fear of god
Post by: billberg23 on 16 May, 2007, 17:56:37
Ὃς τὸν θεὸν οὐ φοβεῖται             

Welcome to the Forum, Tal!  Good luck with the Greek, and let us know how it's coming.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tal-C on 16 May, 2007, 19:10:17
thanks alot for your quick answer billberg!

writing that phrase in uppercase letters still holds to the meaning, right?
im downloading greek fornt right now. gonna have some photoshop work to do. :-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 16 May, 2007, 19:18:41
writing that phrase in uppercase letters still holds to the meaning, right?
Right!    OΣ ΤΟΝ ΘΕΟΝ ΟΥ ΦΟΒΕΙΤΑΙ
Title: Name derivative for Tattoo, sorry probably wrong thread!
Post by: Stuart14 on 17 May, 2007, 11:27:19
Hi all.

First post, and hopefully an easy question, although I guess I should have posted this in the Tattoo thread, Sorry!

We named our daughter Callie, which has a Greek derivative, i believe coming from the word for Beautiful.

I wanted to know what the word actually looked like using the Greek lettering, or if possible using Ancient Greek?

Her full name is Callie Parker.

Would it be possible to see it in a gif image, in both the Lithos Pro font and Candara if possible

Thanks in advance!

Stuart
Title: Re: Name derivative for Tattoo, sorry probably wrong thread!
Post by: banned8 on 17 May, 2007, 14:45:38
Hi, Stuart.

Callie is probably derived from Καλλία, which is the feminine of 'better, more beautiful' in ancient Greek. The noun κάλλος is the word for 'beauty'.

You can choose between Κάλλι, which is a straight transliteration, pronounced the same as your daughter's name, and Καλλία, which is the ancient Greek word.

I am also in favour of the lower-case words because you can see where the accent falls (they also look better). On the other hand, the ancients managed it all in upper case.

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg175.imageshack.us%2Fimg175%2F3167%2Fcallieae1.jpg&hash=a3ef332d6257004f8daf8b1a13b9b8542bb1353a)
Title: Re: Name derivative for Tattoo, sorry probably wrong thread!
Post by: Stuart14 on 17 May, 2007, 14:55:25
Thanks so much.

I don\'t suppose our surname, \"Parker\" can be translated can it?

I\'m thinking of having her name, followed by the Plato proverb:

ΕΝΑ ΑΛΛΑ ΛΕΟΝΤΑ

Just one, but it’s a Lion

Can I change it slightly to say \"Just one, but she\'s a lion\"? Is that possible?

Could you show me what it would look like out of CAPS?

Thanks for your help, it\'s really appreciated.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 May, 2007, 15:42:39
I suppose you can guess which is which :-}

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg80.imageshack.us%2Fimg80%2F3779%2Fonebutalionessxo6.jpg&hash=f16e72feb67738865838463784a23414f1fe5175)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Stuart14 on 17 May, 2007, 15:53:50
Thanks so much, really appreciated.

Would you be able to write one last gif, all in small letters that said in total

Callie Parker
βέβαιος και νοήμων
Just one, but she is a lion

I'll print it off and try to get it converted to a tattoo!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 May, 2007, 16:03:15
1. Which version of Callie?

2. Line two would be: βεβαία και νοήμων for a female.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Stuart14 on 17 May, 2007, 16:07:04
Let\'s go for the ancient Greek please!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 May, 2007, 16:53:57
So, let's:

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg148.imageshack.us%2Fimg148%2F1034%2Fparkerjb9.jpg&hash=ff789c4067c8b9a41e31ce287bd7ae907b9f7891)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Stuart14 on 17 May, 2007, 17:00:27
Fantastic, I think that will look really nice, just need to work out where to get it done!!!

Really appreciate all your help Nickel. Thanks a lot.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: angel.eyes on 17 May, 2007, 21:11:39
hi everyone im planning on gettin a tattoo in greek and was just wondering what a couple words were in greek writing...
apparently my name Angela in greek is angelos and i was wondering what that would look like in all lower case greek...
also "she flies with her own wings"
i was also wondering if it waspossible to hav my initials in greek ADC in upper or lower case.. thanks!!!
please email me at a_corrado21@hotmail.com

- Angela
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 May, 2007, 21:56:44
In reverse order:

1. We would need to know your middle name for your initials. On the basis of what we have, we could give you Α...Κ.

2. "She flies on/with her own wings": my rendering (but wait till we get the experts' OK)

ἰδίαις πτέρυξιν ἵπταται

3. Angel is ἄγγελος or Ἄγγελος as a man's name, but we also have a form for a woman's name in modern Greek, which is:

Ἀγγέλα

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 17 May, 2007, 23:48:57
also "she flies with her own wings"
Nickel's ἰδίαις πτέρυξιν ἵπταται sounds good to me;  ἵπταμαι (rather than the usual πέτομαι) is attested in some Hellenistic authors.
I'm not sure whether Angela wanted it in ancient or modern Greek. But maybe she's happy with either.
Title: joy
Post by: nik on 18 May, 2007, 04:30:53
I want to get the word "joy" as a tattoo in ancient greek but I want to be sure it's the correct word. Would someone please translate "joy" for me?
Title: Re: Tattoo translation
Post by: billberg23 on 18 May, 2007, 05:06:47
Would someone please translate "joy" for me?
χαρά                                            Upper case:  XAPA
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Stuart14 on 18 May, 2007, 12:48:25
Hi Nickel,

Sorry to be a pain.

Would you be able to write the translation you did for me yesterday straight onto the board rather than using a gif image. I want to be able to cut and past it into a word doc so that I can start changing the font sizes etc!

Also, do I need to download a new font type to be able to replicate your font in the gif file?

Thanks in advance
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 18 May, 2007, 16:05:30
Καλλία Πάρκερ

Βεβαία και νοήμων

Μία αλλά λέαινα


If you want to use Candara, check Word to see if you have the font. It normally comes with Windows Vista. Otherwise, you can download it here (http://www.4shared.com/file/16190907/a979a829/Candara.html) and install it through Control Panel > Fonts after you have unzipped the files in a folder of your choice (or skip one step by unzipping directly to your \Windows\Fonts directory).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Stuart14 on 18 May, 2007, 16:23:11
Thanks a lot Nickel. Really appreciated.

I quite like it in Lucinda Sans Unicode, although will have a play around

In one line,

Καλλία Πάρκερ Μία αλλά λέαινα

Would you be able to do one more jpeg for me using that Lithos font you have?

The greek above is modern isn\'t it? Does it look a lot different as Ancient Greek?

Last time, I promise!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 21 May, 2007, 19:46:56
(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg170.imageshack.us%2Fimg170%2F5955%2Fkpll4.jpg&hash=a254242a87c129f4aadb3c483758e201894198ca)

In Lithos font, which has no lower-case characters (nor did the ancients).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nik on 21 May, 2007, 20:19:42
I want to get the word joy in ancient greek. Would someone please translate that for me?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 21 May, 2007, 21:43:43
I want to get the word joy in ancient greek. Would someone please translate that for me?
Nik, we already posted that for you the other day.  See Reply *989.  It's the same in both ancient and modern Greek.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Stuart14 on 22 May, 2007, 12:25:47
Thanks Nickel. Really Appreciate it.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: aslanskeep on 26 May, 2007, 00:49:45
Hi, this is an awesome service/forum.

I am looking to get a tattoo in "Bible" Greek for the phrase "Purified by Fire" or "Refined by Fire".
I prefer purified, but I don't know if the terms would be the same in Greek.  I would love to see it in both regular and all caps.

Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 26 May, 2007, 03:21:18
I am looking to get a tattoo in "Bible" Greek for the phrase "Purified by Fire" or "Refined by Fire".
Purified/refined by fire =  τῷ πυρὶ καθαρθείς  (feminine καθαρθεῖσα, neuter καθαρθέν)
Upper case:  ΤΩΙ ΠΥΡΙ ΚΑΘΑΡΘΕΙΣ  (ΚΑΘΑΡΘΕΙΣΑ, ΚΑΘΑΡΘΕΝ)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Saaa on 27 May, 2007, 17:40:48
oh my god, im so glad i found this forum. REALLY, I am.

can someone please translate the word "tempest" into greek & possibly ancient greek (i'm not sure if the word was around then; someone did say it was in the odyssey, but i'm sure 'tempest' stems from latin)

i have looked around on various translation/dictionary sites for the modern greek equivelant but each website comes up with different words, and im not sure which is the more accurate translation.

i'd be really grateful for any help on this! thanks
 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 27 May, 2007, 18:01:51
can someone please translate the word "tempest" into greek & possibly ancient greek
You're in luck, Saaa.  The word hasn't changed in at least 3000 years:

θύελλα                                        Upper case:   Θ Υ Ε Λ Λ Α
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Matt111111 on 29 May, 2007, 10:22:31
I would like this translated to ancient greek "I would rather live one day as a lion, then live one hundred years as a sheep"
But for tatto reasons, I need it separated into two parts "I would rather live one day as a lion" and then the second part "Then live one hundred years as a sheep"

Thanks alot,
Matt
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Matt111111 on 29 May, 2007, 10:26:21
Oh and sorry I forgot to add this in my last post, could you let me know what the upper and lower case versions are as well for the saying "I would rather live one day as a lion, then live one hundred years as a sheep"

Thanks so much,
Matt
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 29 May, 2007, 16:24:13
"I would rather live one day as a lion, than live one hundred years as a sheep"
ΒΟΥΛΟΙΜΗΝ ΑΝ ΜΙΑΝ ΗΜΕΡΑΝ ΩΣ ΛΕΩΝ ΖΗΝ
Η ΕΚΑΤΟΝ ΕΝΙΑΥΤΟΥΣ ΩΣ ΟΙΣ

Βουλοίμην ἂν μίαν ἡμέραν ὡς λέων ζῆν
 ἢ ἑκατὀν ἐνιαυτοὺς ὡς οἶς


Your regional accent probably doesn't distinguish, Matt, between the pronunciations of "then" and "than."  This means you'll have to work a bit harder at noticing the difference in spelling.
Title: One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life: That word is love.
Post by: Carmen on 29 May, 2007, 19:42:07
Hello to everybody! I am about to get a tattoo and I just recently discovered your website and I hope you kan help me. I have tried for a long time to find the ancient greek translation of Sophokles quote but I have not been able to get it right.

Could you please please help me?
Title: Re: One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life: That word is love.
Post by: billberg23 on 29 May, 2007, 20:18:34
Hello to everybody! I am about to get a tattoo and I just recently discovered your website and I hope you kan help me. I have tried for a long time to find the ancient greek translation of Sophokles quote but I have not been able to get it right.
Your quotation is actually a very free interpretation of the following lines of Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus (1615-1618):

ἀλλ' ἓν γἀρ μόνον
τἀ πάντα λύει ταῦτ' ἔπος μοχθήματα.
τὸ γὰρ φιλεῖν οὐκ ἔστιν ἐξ ὅτου πλέον
ἢ τοῦδε τἀνδρὸς ἔσχεθ'...

"Yet one little word makes all those toils as naught;  love  had ye from me, as from none beside..."  (R. C. Jebb's translation)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Carmen on 29 May, 2007, 20:29:03
Thanks! No wonder I couldn't get it right. How would it sound if you translate the sentence I wrote?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 29 May, 2007, 20:47:37
Thanks! No wonder I couldn't get it right. How would it sound if you translate the sentence I wrote?
Ι can cut it down to

Ἒν ἔπος πάντα λύει τὰ βίου μοχθήματα, τὸ φιλεῖν 
(One word resolves all the burdens of life — love.)

but remember, it ain't Sophocles!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Carmen on 29 May, 2007, 21:16:25
Thank you Billberg! You are the best!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dk on 02 Jun, 2007, 17:14:04
Καλησπέρα σας κατ' αρχάς συγχαριτήρια για το site και χαίρομαι που υπάρχουν ανθρώποι που συνεχίζουν την Γλώσσα μας ορθά...

θα ήθελα αν μπορούσατε να μου μεταφράσετε το παρόν κείμενο στα αρχαία ελληνικά διότι είμαι φαντάρος και δέν κατέχω ιδιαίτερες γραμματικές γνώσεις και χρειάζομαι την σωστή ορθογραφία διότη είναι για δερματιστοιξία :P

το κείμενο είναι : σεβασμός σε λίγους, φόβο σε έναν
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 02 Jun, 2007, 18:16:11
σεβασμός σε λίγους, φόβο σε έναν
Σεβασμὸς πρὸς ὀλίγους, φόβος πρὸς ἕνα

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: walkeraj on 05 Jun, 2007, 01:36:13
I also want a tattoo in ancient Greek.  How do you render "hen oida hoti ouden oida"?
Is this correct?

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi11.tinypic.com%2F660wmcp.jpg&hash=91a3738fb5f9de7613cd2d4a2d18043714b73ef9)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Jun, 2007, 03:13:37
Is this correct?

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi11.tinypic.com%2F660wmcp.jpg&hash=91a3738fb5f9de7613cd2d4a2d18043714b73ef9)
Αbsolutely.  If you want upper case, it's
ΕΝ ΟΙΔΑ ΟΤΙ ΟΥΔΕΝ ΟΙΔΑ

Afterthought:  for complete polytonic correctness, change ἕν το ἓν.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: spamtastic on 07 Jun, 2007, 04:50:53
I was hoping you could please translate this phrase PLEASURE AND PAIN for me. I would really appreciate it if you could show it to me in all the available fonts. Also, if anyone knows of a similar site where you can get english translated into hebrew I would really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 07 Jun, 2007, 08:34:48
I was hoping you could please translate this phrase PLEASURE AND PAIN for me. I would really appreciate it if you could show it to me in all the available fonts. Also, if anyone knows of a similar site where you can get english translated into hebrew I would really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance
Here it is in the normal Tahoma font:

ἡδονή τε καὶ ἄλγος                           ΗΔΟΝΗ ΤΕ ΚΑΙ ΑΛΓΟΣ

The font options are almost infinite.  If you have any particular shapes and forms in mind, the Fontmaster may be able to help you.
Enjoy the Greek!  Others can probably help with the Hebrew. 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kiel on 09 Jun, 2007, 05:38:15
Hi guys. I'm so glad I found this forum!
Please help me if you can...

I want to get a tattoo on my arm with two words written in ancient greek - 'Passion' and 'Purpose'
As in, this is a reflection on the life I want to live - a life of passion and a life of purpose.

Hope that's enough info, please let me know if not.

Thanks a bunch.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 09 Jun, 2007, 06:23:12
I want to get a tattoo on my arm with two words written in ancient greek - 'Passion' and 'Purpose'
As in, this is a reflection on the life I want to live - a life of passion and a life of purpose.
There are a number of ways to express those notions in Greek.  I like these best for your purposes:

ΘΥΜΟΣ (θυμός), passion, high spirit

ΦΡΟΝΗΣΙΣ (φρόνησις), purpose, well-considered intention

Together, they seem to express the balance you seem to want between strong emotion and thoughtful self-direction.  Good luck!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: kiel on 11 Jun, 2007, 04:10:48
Awesome! Thanks so much for that! :)
Title: absurd spirit seeking calm
Post by: charliedncn on 11 Jun, 2007, 20:11:01
Hey, i'd like to get a tattoo done soon but i want it in ancient greek, so i was hoping someone here could help me with a translation:

"absurd spirit seeking calm"

thanks :)
Title: Re: absurd spirit seeking calm
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Jun, 2007, 21:00:28
"absurd spirit seeking calm"
EYΗΘΗΣ ΨΥΧΗ ΓΑΛΗΝΗΣ ΙΜΕΙΡΟΥΣΑ

Lower case:  Εὐήθης ψυχὴ γαλήνης ἱμείρουσα
Title: Phoenix tattto
Post by: Christopher on 12 Jun, 2007, 05:51:16
I'm so glad I found this site. I am fascinated with Greek mythology and I am getting a tattoo of a phoenix that I designed. I thought it would look great with some beautiful Greek letters encasing it with this phrase:

"Risen from the ashes I am reborn."

I have had a hard time deciding on a phrase similar to that. I would be extremly grateful for any help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nikitas200 on 12 Jun, 2007, 06:49:37
hello, I am new to posting and to having a login, but I have been viewing often. The term or phrase   "Love Life" seems to be a difficult thing for me to find the translation while keeping the same context, any suggestions ?
Title: Re: Phoenix tattto
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Jun, 2007, 06:56:03
"Risen from the ashes I am reborn."
Ἐκ σποδοὺ ἀναστὰς πάλιν γίγνομαι

ΕΚ ΣΠΟΔΟΥ ΑΝΑΣΤΑΣ ΠΑΛΙΝ ΓΙΓΝΟΜΑΙ
 

If you travel in Greece, you might think of wearing the tattoo with caution (with a shirt, etc.).  The Phoenix was the symbol chosen by the military junta that usurped the Greek democracy between 1967 and 1974, and caused untold misery for the freedom-loving Greeks.  It was seen everywhere for seven years, and is still remembered with bitterness.
On the other hand, the Phoenix was also a popular symbol in the Greek war of independence in the early 19th century.  In a few years, it may be a toss-up ...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Jun, 2007, 07:07:22
"Love Life" seems to be a difficult thing for me to find the translation while keeping the same context, any suggestions ?
Not sure what you mean by "the same context," but here it is in its simplest form:

Τὴν ζωὴν ἀγάπα                            Plural: Τὴν ζωὴν ἀγαπᾶτε

ΤΗΝ ΖΩΗΝ ΑΓΑΠΑ                                    ΤΗΝ ΖΩΗΝ ΑΓΑΠΑΤΕ
Title: Phoenix tattoo
Post by: Christopher on 12 Jun, 2007, 07:18:38
Wow I had no idea of that. I'll keep that in mind since im visiting Greece this summer. But thank you very much for the help.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Saaa on 13 Jun, 2007, 21:59:48
grah, sorry to be a pain again. but what is 'Alex' and 'Alexander' translated to in ancient greek? i have the first 3 letters down - θλε but i can't figure out the rest for fear of translating using the wrong alphabet.

can someone help out please?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Saaa on 13 Jun, 2007, 22:04:05
αλέξ &

αλέξανδερ

is that right?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 13 Jun, 2007, 22:19:36
"Alexander" comes from the ancient Greek name Ἀλέξανδρος (upper case ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΣ). 
As for the English name "Alex," the Greek transliteration would be Άλεξ (ΑΛΕΞ).
Title: a greek asking for some help
Post by: rafinatraveller on 15 Jun, 2007, 03:29:27
Within the last few years my life took a turn for the worst but in recent times I have been changing my life around for the better.  A majority of this came from fracturing one of my vertebrae and several family problems and I have basically pulled myself out of a really bad state that I was in.  Because of this I got a phoenix tattoo, as it signifies rebirth more or less and a fresh start, and I was hoping I could get some help with a phrase that would relate to the phoenix. 

I saw that farther down the forums this has been brought up but I was hoping to get a few suggestions.  I would like this in modern Greek as I am half Greek and my Greek heritage is very important to me.  If you could also give the correct way to pronounce the phrases I would greatly appreciate it.  I am going to be teaching myself Greek in the near future but your help in how to pronounce the phrases correctly would be a great help.
Title: Re: a greek asking for some help
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Jun, 2007, 07:50:16
Because of this I got a phoenix tattoo, as it signifies rebirth more or less and a fresh start, and I was hoping I could get some help with a phrase that would relate to the phoenix. 
I saw that farther down the forums this has been brought up but I was hoping to get a few suggestions.  I would like this in modern Greek as I am half Greek and my Greek heritage is very important to me.  If you could also give the correct way to pronounce the phrases I would greatly appreciate it. 
Rafina, how about αναγεννώμαι από την τέφρα μου?  It means "I am born again from my ashes." 
Upper case is ΑΝΑΓΕΝΝΩΜΑΙ ΑΠΟ ΤΗΝ ΤΕΦΡΑ ΜΟΥ, and it's pronounced

ah-nah-yen-no-meh  ah-po  teen  teh-frah  moo
(accented syllables in bold type).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dionisios on 16 Jun, 2007, 14:47:58
if possible i would like this name translated for a tattoo

Dionisios Demertzis


thank you... you can email me at nesnum@gmail.com
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 16 Jun, 2007, 15:06:47
Your name in Greek would be:

Διονύσιος Δεμερτζῆς (modern Greek: Δεμερτζής)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ZCHanson on 16 Jun, 2007, 18:57:37
I have been browsing these forums for sometime, and i know everyone appreciates the work ya'll do translating. I have a question not exactly having to do with translation, but possibly assist in a future tattoo. My great-grandfather came to America from Greece in 1910, and served for the US in WW1. On his discharge papers it lists his birthplace as Gardikeon, Greece. After tireless searches I have not been able to find this on any map. I am believing that it is near Pireaus. Any help would be greatly appreciated! If this needs to be moved to another place just let me know and i will remove it! thank you so much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Jun, 2007, 21:22:05
My great-grandfather came to America from Greece in 1910, and served for the US in WW1. On his discharge papers it lists his birthplace as Gardikeon, Greece. After tireless searches I have not been able to find this on any map. I am believing that it is near Pireaus.
There are several places in Greece called "Gardikion,"  all of them now known as "Gardiki."  None of them are very close to Piraeus.  You'll be able to locate most of them on a detailed map.  Cf. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gardiki

On Google Earth, and on Google maps, the name is spelled "Gardhiki."

Good luck with narrowing your search!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ZCHanson on 17 Jun, 2007, 00:53:12
Thank you so much for the help!
Title: Lalage -> λαλαγή
Post by: lalmerriman on 17 Jun, 2007, 20:46:50
My name is Lalage and I am told that this is of Greek origin (meaning to babble or babbling brook). I would like 'Lalage' written in Greek as a tattoo. Could you tell me what the Greek translation is?, or what it should look like?
Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Jun, 2007, 21:10:14
The word is indeed λαλαγή (ΛΑΛΑΓΗ in upper case). The name was used by Horace in his Ode 1.22 for his beloved. It was not her real name, but was a pseudonym, from Greek (λαλαγή = 1. prattle 2. chirping of birds and grasshoppers or cicadas), presumably intended as a compliment rather than criticism. Here (http://www.dl.ket.org/latinlit/forum/lovepoem.htm) I read: In Ode 1.22, he speaks fondly, not cynically, of Lalage, his girlfriend in the poem ('dulce ridentem Lalagen amabo / dulce loquentem')... (translation: I will love the sweetly laughing, sweetly chattering Lalage). Elsewhere: Just as Horace is singing of Lalage, the 'prattler', in the Sabine woods...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Timothy on 18 Jun, 2007, 00:21:47
After reading 70 pages of posts on this website I am extremely impressed by those who regular it and provide so much insight, advice, and assistance. 

The posts here have me wondering about my own name.  I am of Greek descent; second generation American.  My name is Timothy Andrew Kanelopoulos.  When it comes to translating my first and middle(from Greek Andreas) name are the Ancient Greek spellings used in modern times because they are of biblical origin? 

When the last name is translated is it a transliteration because it is Americanized?  I know that my grandfather's last name was Kanelos before coming to America and I've always wondered why it was lengthened.   I'd be interested in seeing the spellings of my entire name.  Thanks for reading! :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 18 Jun, 2007, 00:54:52
Hi, Tim.

Both Timothy (Τιμόθεος, honouring God or honoured by God) and Andrew (Ανδρέας, from aner, gen. andros = man, andreia = valour) are names of Greek origin, and Greek names appear to have been common among the Jews from the second or third century B.C. (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01471a.htm).

Kanellos (Κανέλλος) used to be a common Greek name and surname, Kanellopoulos (Κανελλόπουλος) is a surname and means "Kanellos's son". We even had a prime minister (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panagiotis_Kanellopoulos) by that surname. I presume the name is related to κανέλλα (the word for cinnamon).

So your full name would be written: Τιμόθεος Ανδρέας Κανελλόπουλος.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: KatieB on 18 Jun, 2007, 13:37:54
hi, i  was wondering if you could help me?

i am wanting a tattoo personal to me that not many people have, well the people i will come across! my name is Katie and understand it is of greek origin meaning 'pure'. I was wondering whether you could translate 'she who is pure' into anciant greek...

i would very much appreciate it and looking through the other posts it appears to me that you have a great knowledge and understanding of the language, that will give me the best chance of having an accurate translation.

thanks so much, Katie
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Jun, 2007, 15:11:05
I was wondering whether you could translate 'she who is pure' into anciant greek...
ἡ καθαρά                               Upper case:  Η ΚΑΘΑΡΑ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: KatieB on 18 Jun, 2007, 16:43:03
Thankyou!

is that actually 'she who is pure' or is it a similar phrase meaning the same thing? and how do you pronounce that?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Jun, 2007, 18:26:49
Thankyou!

is that actually 'she who is pure' or is it a similar phrase meaning the same thing? and how do you pronounce that?
It means literally "The Pure One (feminine),"  and it's really the only way to say "She who is pure" in ancient Greek.

Pronunciation:  ee kah-thah-rah, with accent on the final syllable.     
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: KatieB on 18 Jun, 2007, 19:11:36
ok thankyou! your help is appreciated!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kergie on 19 Jun, 2007, 00:19:49
I am looking for a translation of the word: story as in history.

I looked up the greek translation and it is this: Ιστορία

But I'd like to know what that word is written out in English...the English form of the word, like Doxazo Theon means "I praise God"...I'm pretty sure.

I hope this all makes sense : )

Thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Jun, 2007, 06:02:39
I am looking for a translation of the word: story as in history.

I looked up the greek translation and it is this: Ιστορία

But I'd like to know what that word is written out in English...the English form of the word, like Doxazo Theon means "I praise God"...I'm pretty sure.
If we're talking about ancient Greek, the word ἱστορία originally meant "research."  Herodotus, the first historian, presented the results of his "research" as a vast panorama of human events covering a very long period of time. In later ages, people came to call any such "Herodotean" account "history," so the original meaning of the word was obscured.

A "story," by contrast, was called a λόγος, if it was based on real experience, or a μῦθος, if it wasn't.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 19 Jun, 2007, 13:57:24
But I'd like to know what that word is written out in English... the English form of the word, like Doxazo Theon means "I praise God"...

ἱστορία written in English is HISTORIA, if that's what you're looking for.
Title: grace and agape in greek text
Post by: scw on 19 Jun, 2007, 19:08:17
I would like to get either grace or agape as a tattoo in Greek . Could you help me with the Greek text? thank you.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: scw on 19 Jun, 2007, 19:33:27
I am also hoping to get a greek tattoo of either: agape or grace. Could you please translate those words into greek text for me. thank you!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Jun, 2007, 19:55:28
I am also hoping to get a greek tattoo of either: agape or grace. Could you please translate those words into greek text for me. thank you!
ἀγάπη    ΑΓΑΠΗ     (LOVE)

χάρις      ΧΑΡΙΣ      (GRACE)
Title: Re: grace and agape in greek text
Post by: wings on 19 Jun, 2007, 19:58:49
Grace = Χάρις

Love = Αγάπη
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kergie on 19 Jun, 2007, 21:49:33

A "story," by contrast, was called a λόγος, if it was based on real experience, or a μῦθος, if it wasn't.

So what would these be written in English?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 19 Jun, 2007, 21:56:30
@Kergie:

Λόγος (ΛΟΓΟΣ) is Logos (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logos_%28philosophy_and_religion%29) in English.

Μύθος (ΜΥΘΟΣ) is transliterated as Mythos (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mythology) and in English it is 'myth'.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: scw on 19 Jun, 2007, 22:02:37
thank you!
Title: from fire comes life
Post by: amana22 on 20 Jun, 2007, 00:26:04
Hello. I am looking to get this as a tattoo- curious to see what it looks like in Greek. Not sure if it matters, but I am female. and fire refers to the element primarily, but also the verb. not sure if i can have it both ways visually, but metaphorically it is intended to. Thank you so much!

amanda
Title: Re: from fire comes life
Post by: billberg23 on 20 Jun, 2007, 00:49:53
ΕΚ ΤΟΥ ΠΥΡΟΣ Η ΖΩΗ

Lower case:  ἐκ τοῦ πυρὸς ἡ ζωή
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Ross on 20 Jun, 2007, 15:14:58
Hello everybody :) I've just created an account here having seen the amazingly detailed help offered! Nickel, wings and billberg... you're awesome! hehe...

I'm looking for a phrase in Greek if anyone could suggest it, and also a confirmation on the word 'Believe' in Greek too! Also, to add to my list ( :P ) I'd really appreciate it if anyone could tell me whether the word 'Believe' as I have it is in Modern or Ancient Greek - I haven't been able to find out myself.

The word 'Believe' as I have it is: πιστεύω

The phrase I'm looking for is 'Live and Learn', or something similar if possible :)

Thanks a lot!!! :D
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 20 Jun, 2007, 15:43:27
I'd really appreciate it if anyone could tell me whether the word 'Believe' as I have it is in Modern or Ancient Greek - I haven't been able to find out myself.

The word 'Believe' as I have it is: πιστεύω

The phrase I'm looking for is 'Live and Learn', or something similar if possible :)
You have the right word, Ross:  it means "I believe" in both ancient and modern Greek.

Perennially, the most popular equivalent of "Live and Learn" in the Greek literary tradition is ΠΑΘΕΙ ΜΑΘΟΣ (lower case πάθει μάθος), from Aeschylus' Agamemnon, verse 177.  Literally, it means "Learning by undergoing" or "Learn through suffering."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 20 Jun, 2007, 17:46:07
P.S. @ Ross:  It occurs to me that you may not want the first person form πιστεύω ("I believe").  In Greek, there's no way to separate out the simple verb stem, as we do in English.  You can, however, choose the infinitive πιστεύειν ("to believe"), the imperative πίστευε ("believe!"), or the noun ἡ πίστις ("belief").
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: amana22 on 20 Jun, 2007, 22:10:42
thank you for the translation help! Sorry for the 2nd posting, wasnt exactly sure where to look for that first posting.

amanda
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: russanod on 20 Jun, 2007, 22:39:52
Hi everyone,

im getting a tattoo done on sunday, and i was wondering if anyone could translate:

"Speak Your Mind"

and "Wisdom Begins in Wonder"

Thank you all so very much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 20 Jun, 2007, 22:59:59
"Speak Your Mind"
and "Wisdom Begins in Wonder"
1. Singular:  παρρησιάζου
    Plural:      παρρησιάζεσθε

2.  Διά τὸ θαυμάζειν ἡ σοφία

(See also https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg65481#msg65481
 message #785.
Title: Slave to no man
Post by: tslave484 on 20 Jun, 2007, 23:28:10
Good Afternoon,
I am planning on getting a tattoo that says "Slave to no man", or something along those lines.
The idea came to me from the passage in the bible (1 Corinthians 7:23) that says "You were bought with a price, do not be a slave to men."
Could you translate both phrases for me, in ancient greek please?


Title: Re: Slave to no man
Post by: billberg23 on 21 Jun, 2007, 00:20:55
Good Afternoon,
I am planning on getting a tattoo that says "Slave to no man", or something along those lines.
The idea came to me from the passage in the bible (1 Corinthians 7:23) that says "You were bought with a price, do not be a slave to men."
Could you translate both phrases for me, in ancient greek please?
Sure.  Scripture first: Τιμῆς ἠγοράσθητε·  μὴ γίνεσθε δοῦλοι ἀνθρώπων.

Tattoo:  οὐδενὸς ἀνθρώπου δοῦλος           upper case:  ΟΥΔΕΝΟΣ ΑΝΘΡΩΠΟΥ ΔΟΥΛΟΣ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Timothy on 21 Jun, 2007, 01:31:26
“The energy of the mind is the essence of life.” - Aristotle

I was wondering if you might be able to tell me the origin of this quote.  I have searched on my own and have found nothing substantial.  The moderators here seem to have a large amount of resources for situations such as these.  I am also interested in seeing it in it's original text.  Thank you.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: russanod on 21 Jun, 2007, 04:01:49
1. Singular:  παρρησιάζου
    Plural:      παρρησιάζεσθε

2.  Διά τὸ θαυμάζειν ἡ σοφία

(See also https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg65481#msg65481
 message #785.

Thank you for translating for me! However, when you distinguish b/t singular and plural, what exactly are you referring to? I hope you forgive my ignorance in this area. I am familiar with ancient greek only in that i adore classical philsophy and nothing else, thank you! :)
Title: i am you and you are me
Post by: Vernont005 on 21 Jun, 2007, 04:34:51
I am looking for a translation of

'i am you and you are me'

into Ancient Greek.

I'd appreciate any help.  Thank you for your attention
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tslave484 on 21 Jun, 2007, 16:23:08
Thank you so much!! This is fantastic!
Could you show me what "Τιμῆς ἠγοράσθητε·  μὴ γίνεσθε δοῦλοι ἀνθρώπων." looks like in uppercase?
I think I prefer that.
Thanks again for your prompt response!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: tslave484 on 21 Jun, 2007, 16:26:44
Also, what is the correct pronounciation for ΟΥΔΕΝΟΣ ΑΝΘΡΩΠΟΥ ΔΟΥΛΟΣ?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wouter on 21 Jun, 2007, 20:57:55
"ICARUS OR IKAROS, SON OF DAIDALOS IN GREEK MYTHOLOGY"

hi guys,
I am Wouter from Holland and I have this burning question i would like to have answered.
Can anyone please tell me how the name ICARUS OR IKAROS was written in ANCIENT GREEK??
I am thinking about having this word tattooed, but I'm not sure if i should have it in lower case or in upper case. If you could, please write it down in both ways. Many many thanks..,

Wouter

Ps: i came as far as this: Ίκαρος but i dont know if it's the modern translation or the ancient
 

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: dionisios on 22 Jun, 2007, 18:00:54
Your name in Greek would be:

Διονύσιος Δεμερτζῆς (modern Greek: Δεμερτζής)


is it possible to write this again with out the capitals letters at the front
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: eliza on 23 Jun, 2007, 22:05:07
Hello all, I'm Eliza!  I'm looking forward to getting the following phrase translated:

lay down your armour and seize your life

into Ancient Latin or Ancient Greek, depending on which can be the most closely translated.
Thanks so much for your assistance.  Cheers!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Nikolos on 24 Jun, 2007, 15:54:28
Hi im from Denmark and i want to have a tattoo written in your amazing ancient greek language!

Here are the phrases that i want to make!

"God has left me"    "The Devil fears me"

also this one: "Only God will judge me"

This is not for me offcourse!:)
Is for a friend of mine

Thank you in advance.
Title: Re: Απ: The day i learn to fly im never coming down
Post by: Nikolos on 24 Jun, 2007, 16:01:55
Hi there.

Your phrase can be:

"Τη μέρα που θα μάθω να πετώ δεν θα ξαναπατήσω στη γη"

All the best for the weekend,

Vicky



Hi im from Denmark and i want to have a tattoo written in your amazing ancient greek language!

Here are the phrases that i want to make!

"God has left me"    "The Devil fears me"

also this one: "Only God will judge me"

This is not for me offcourse!:)
Is for a friend of mine

Thank you in advance.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 24 Jun, 2007, 16:14:34
The section's moderator and chief contributor is away on holiday. Only urgent and simple requests will be handled depending on the availability of other contributors.

Please be patient.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Oblitron on 24 Jun, 2007, 16:17:10
Dear Nikolos, I'm sure a member of this forum will be kind enough to provide you with a translation. However, do you really feel there is a strong association between Christianity and Ancient Greece? I personally don't think there is. If you want an ancient-looking tattoo about God and the Devil, may I suggest Hebrew as a more fitting language?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Jun, 2007, 12:56:30
Thank you for translating for me! However, when you distinguish b/t singular and plural, what exactly are you referring to? I hope you forgive my ignorance in this area. I am familiar with ancient greek only in that i adore classical philsophy and nothing else, thank you! :)
Singular:  You are telling one person to speak his/her mind.
Plural:  You are telling more than one person to speak their minds.
Title: Re: absurd freedom
Post by: oneangryzeus on 26 Jun, 2007, 03:13:44
i would also like a tatoo in ancient greek (or greek if it can't translate into ancient) the prhase is "absurd freedom" thanks in advance
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: martali on 29 Jun, 2007, 00:58:49
Hi.
Myself and my wife,having just been married want to get each others names translated into ancient greek if this is possible.

They are 'alison' and 'martin'.

It would be great if anyone could help.
Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 29 Jun, 2007, 02:43:31
Myself and my wife,having just been married want to get each others names translated into ancient greek if this is possible.
They are 'alison' and 'martin'.

You understand, I'm sure, there are no Ancient Greek forms of these names. Not even for Martin Luther. In modern Green your names are:

Άλισον

Μάρτιν
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Nikolos on 01 Jul, 2007, 21:13:08
id love to have this translated for a tattoo i want.
thanks

Hi im from Denmark and i want to have a tattoo written in your amazing ancient greek language!

Here are the phrases that i want to make!

"God has left me"    "The Devil fears me"

also this one: "Only God will judge me"

This is not for me offcourse!:)
Is for a friend of mine

Thank you in advance.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mylostsoul on 08 Jul, 2007, 02:59:29
Hi,                                                                                                                                                             There i have been searching and searching for a web sit like tis for ages!!! Thank god.. ok id like a tattoo in ancient greek but first can i ask where you learnt geek i would love to learn the language any tips on how? i wont 2 learn ancient not modern well both but mostly ancient. Can you help me?.    Thank you.                                                           
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wings on 08 Jul, 2007, 10:26:31
Hi,                                                                                                                                                             There i have been searching and searching for a web sit like tis for ages!!! Thank god.. ok id like a tattoo in ancient greek but first can i ask where you learnt geek i would love to learn the language any tips on how? i wont 2 learn ancient not modern well both but mostly ancient. Can you help me?.    Thank you.                                                           

Hi, there.

Most of us are Greeks; thus, we learned Greek at school (Ancient Greek, too).
Title: absurd freedom -> παράλογη ελευθερία
Post by: oneangryzeus on 13 Jul, 2007, 05:39:59
first off i know its in the tattoo's thread but i'm kind of deeply in need...i suffer from depression and its recently gotten very bad and i think that if i have the greatly enthusiastic and uplifting phrase (from the philosophy of camus) on my body then i will feel much better due to the reminder that will be in plain view. 

i have looked high and low for these words and i have tried to translate them myself with online dictionaries but one can never be sure with grammar when only using online dictionaries.

i greatly appreciate anyone helping me and i also greatly appreciate the moderators if they allow me to have this thread even though ive posted this request in another place.

thanks again.




Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: sher_bet on 13 Jul, 2007, 08:52:45
I have been reading up a bit on the ancient Greek idiom "kalos kai agathos," or "the beautiful and the good," and would love to get a tattoo of it. It appeals to me because it's what I want in my life and what I would like to embody, not only on a superficial aesthetic level but on a deeper spiritual level as well. As I understand it the phrase was used to describe gentlemen by their appearance (handsome) as well as their character (noble). Well, being female, I thought it would be more gender-appropriate to use the feminine form of kalos, so my tattoo would read "καλή κ?γαθός".

Having no exposure to Greek outside some translated Plato readings in a college philosophy class, I wanted to run my idea by people more knowledgeable than me! Please let me know what you think. Is the idea misguided, are there any reservations I should have before placing this on my body? I know some Chinese and have seen too many people who should have consulted a Chinese speaker before getting nonsense permanently inked on themselves, don't want to make the same mistake.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 13 Jul, 2007, 12:00:07
masculine:
καλὸς κἀγαθὸς

feminine:
καλὴ κἀγαθὴ

Some background on the ancient Greek phrase:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalos_Kagathos

Interestingly, though the phrase may still be used with its ancient Greek meaning, the modern Greek adjective καλοκάγαθος has lost the sense of nobleness and simply means good-natured, kindly. This should not, however, stop you from using the phrase.
Title: Re: absurd freedom
Post by: banned8 on 13 Jul, 2007, 13:22:03
Camus' "absurd freedom" is παράλογη ελευθερία in modern Greek. Trust me, you don't want the ancient Greek for that, simply because the ancient Greeks did not think like Camus. Παράλογος in those days was more like "unexpected". Their word for absurd, irra,tional, was "άλογος" and "τα άλογα" meant the animals, the brutes. As a result, in modern Greek our word for horse (ἵππος in ancient Greek, as in hippocampus) is άλογο.

In any case, if you are suffering from depression, stay away from Camus. Read and do the things that can give you the joy of life. Do everything and do it in moderation. For the time being, read Bill Bryson and watch Marx Brothers movies.
Title: Re: absurd freedom
Post by: mavrodon on 13 Jul, 2007, 14:22:43
Camus' "absurd freedom" is παράλογη ελευθερία in modern Greek. Trust me, you don't want the ancient Greek for that, simply because the ancient Greeks did not think like Camus. Παράλογος in those days was more like "unexpected". Their word for absurd, irra,tional, was "άλογος" and "τα άλογα" meant the animals, the brutes. As a result, in modern Greek our word for horse (ἵππος in ancient Greek, as in hippocampus) is άλογο.

In any case, if you are suffering from depression, stay away from Camus. Read and do the things that can give you the joy of life. Do everything and do it in moderation. For the time being, read Bill Bryson and watch Marx Brothers movies.
Good advice Nick. I would add, try and change environment, esp. travel and make new acquaintances.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mediobogdum on 16 Jul, 2007, 05:08:50
Good Evening, thank you very much for contributing you time to this free service. I would very much appreciate the following
in Attic Greek; which I believe would have been the way he wrote it (would that be all in caps?,  the way he would have written it I mean).

lions are not the slaves of those who
feed them, but rather those who feed them are at
the mercy of the lions: for fear is the mark of the
slave, whereas wild beasts make men afraid of them.

thank you very much for your time.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 16 Jul, 2007, 05:20:35
This is from the biography of Diogenes Laertius.

ΟΥΔΕ ΓΑΡ ΤΟΥΣ ΛΕΟΝΤΑΣ
ΔΟΥΛΟΥΣ ΕΙΝΑΙ ΤΩΝ ΤΡΕΦΟΝΤΩΝ
ΑΛΛΑ ΤΟΥΣ ΤΡΕΦΟΝΤΑΣ ΤΩΝ ΛΕΟΝΤΩΝ.
ΔΟΥΛΟΥ ΓΑΡ ΤΟ ΦΟΒΕΙΣΘΑΙ,
ΤΑ ΔΕ ΘΗΡΙΑ ΦΟΒΕΡΑ ΤΟΙΣ ΑΝΘΡΩΠΟΙΣ ΕΙΝΑΙ.

for lions are not
the slaves of those who feed them,
but rather those who feed them are at the mercy of the lions:
for fear is the mark of the slave,
whereas wild beasts make men afraid of them.

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg228.imageshack.us%2Fimg228%2F8679%2Fdiogenesom9.jpg&hash=bf2e1886024bcdb1739f11d66fe8e8a5685c5108)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mediobogdum on 17 Jul, 2007, 04:02:11
 Double post, sorry.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mediobogdum on 17 Jul, 2007, 04:03:21
  Thank you very much nickel. Incidentally you were the one who translated this same passage for me about a year ago, unfortunately I included the atttribution in my request and you dutifully complied.
Once again thank you very much.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mylostsoul on 18 Jul, 2007, 00:37:27
Hi guys, is there any chance you can translate if possible in ancient greek,


  To my soulmate, If we control our destiny I wish to lead mine to you, I ask of Aphrodite take me to you to my destiny,  I give you the only thing that is yours my Body Heart and Soul.                                                                 Your Soulmate.         

thank you.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mylostsoul on 18 Jul, 2007, 00:43:28
Sorry missed a bit out!!    I give you the only thing that is yours and no one elses my Body Heart and Soul.Your soulmate. Thanks again.                                                                
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Hillary on 18 Jul, 2007, 12:05:16
I'm Getting A Tattoo Soon And Would Like The Word Hoplite or Warrior, I've Found A Few, Such As

Πολεμιστής, and
Λακεδαιμόνιος
For Warrior. (What's The Difference??)

Since I Am A Girl, I Wondered If There Was A Feminine Way Of Spelling It - Or Maybe Shorther, Condidering This Is Going On My Ribcage.

Thank you!
Title: Anthony
Post by: TGIB on 19 Jul, 2007, 01:43:38
I was wondering if you could translate this name for me 'Anthony', it would be much appreciated, thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: TGIB on 19 Jul, 2007, 01:45:07
into ancient greek please, thanks
Title: Re: Anthony
Post by: banned8 on 19 Jul, 2007, 02:11:23
I was wondering if you could translate this name for me 'Anthony', it would be much appreciated, thanks

Ἀντώνιος ΑΝΤΩΝΙΟΣ

In lower and upper case. Please note that this is actually a Roman name, thought to be of Etruscan origin.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: TGIB on 19 Jul, 2007, 19:09:08
Thanks for your help and information, much appreciated.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: TGIB on 19 Jul, 2007, 20:07:58
This may seem like a stupid question but how would the date ''2nd of may 1983'' be presented in ancient greek also. (2-5-1983), again thanks.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 19 Jul, 2007, 21:44:17
This is a stupid answer:

βʹ εʹ αϡπγʹ

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_numerals
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: TGIB on 20 Jul, 2007, 01:44:46
Just to be clear then this: βʹ εʹ αϡπγʹ would represent the date 2/5/1983 ??
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Jul, 2007, 01:52:12
No, these are the Greek numerals for 2, 5 and 1983. Obviously, the Greeks never recorded their dates in this manner.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: TGIB on 20 Jul, 2007, 01:55:48
How did they record them?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: F_idάνι on 20 Jul, 2007, 01:58:22
No, these are the Greek numerals for 2, 5 and 1983. Obviously, the Greeks never recorded their dates in this manner.

LOL! They were not THAT wise :-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: TGIB on 20 Jul, 2007, 02:04:07
Or better still how would it be wrote in modern day greek?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Jul, 2007, 02:12:01
Have a look at this article: http://www.polysyllabic.com/?q=calhistory/earlier/greek

It starts: "Of all ancient calendrical systems, the Greek is the most confusing."

Another interesting page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attic_calendar

As regards the modern Greek system, we would write 2/5/1983 for 2nd May and 5/2/1983 for 5th February.
In words:
2 Μαΐου 1983 (2 May 1983)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 20 Jul, 2007, 03:36:44
Let me try some (original and prone to huge error) calculations and try to find your birthday in the Attic Calendar (that's your birthday isn't it), according to the Wiki articles Nickel mentioned above (for Ancient Greek calendar and numerals):

May 2nd was the middle of month Thargelion, sο the 16th day of the Full Moon.

Now about 1983. How many Olympiads had passed since 776BC, the first year of the first Olympiad?  (1983+776)/4=689.75 says the calculator, hence the third year of the 690th Olympiad, since we have 689 completed + 3 years into the 690th

In Ancient Greek, all this would be. Note I'm using Attic Numerals to be consistent with the Attic calendar:

ΔΠΙ ΘΑΡΓΗΛΙΩΝΟΣ ΠΙΗΔΗ ΟΛΥΜΠΙΑΣ ΕΤΟΣ ΙΙΙ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Jul, 2007, 04:13:05
You might get round the problem of the Olympiads if you say:

του έτους 2759 μετά πρώτης Ολυμπιάδος

As far as the day and the month are concerned, I wouldn't dare guess, lycos. Have a look at these pages and despair:
http://alimountas.tripod.com/data/m_fest.html
http://www.astrologicon.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p=6233&sid=8f9275738fbc68138be6e3e7043773cd
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: lycos on 20 Jul, 2007, 04:42:10
Oops I forgot the Ancient Greece revival weirdos! Let me quickly disassociate myself from them, I've just tried this for fun!I concur it's almost impossible to find a straightforward relationship between a lunar and a solar calendar.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: TGIB on 20 Jul, 2007, 18:41:39
Well thanks alot to you both for your help, i think i will go for this   βʹ εʹ αϡπγʹ  as it seems to be the equivalant of writing the date 2-5-1983 in english
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ellinida on 20 Jul, 2007, 21:40:25
hello!

i have just scimmed through most of the pages of this post and i am extremly impressed with all your great translations.
i myself want to get a tattoo in ancient greek and  would like some help translating this specific quote if possible:

" Music is love in search of a word"

Thank you in advance! :)
Title: soul sisters -> αδελφές ψυχές
Post by: Cheynikkita on 24 Jul, 2007, 23:42:43
I'm looking for translation of the above or some ideas for other wording if this can't be translated as is.  It's to represent two biological sisters and the closeness between them.  Thank you for your time.

Chey
Title: Re: soul sisters -> αδελφές ψυχές
Post by: Σουρπουίτσα on 25 Jul, 2007, 00:11:52
I'm looking for translation of the above or some ideas for other wording if this can't be translated as is.  It's to represent two biological sisters and the closeness between them.  Thank you for your time.

Chey

Αδελφές ψυχές
ΑΔΕΛΦΕΣ ΨΥΧΕΣ

You 're lucky, soul in greek is a feminine noun. I hope you wanted a translation in modern greek.
Title: Re: soul sisters -> αδελφές ψυχές
Post by: Cheynikkita on 25 Jul, 2007, 01:13:52
Quote
αδελφές ψυχές

Does this mean exactly soul sisters in English or is it different wording with a close meaning to soul sisters?  Sorry for the stupid question, but this is going in a tattoo and I want to make sure I know what it means exactly before I make it permanent.

Chey
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Calliope on 25 Jul, 2007, 01:24:13
It actually means "sister souls". I think the difference is too subtle; if you were Greek and wanted to call someone your soul sister, that's what you'd go for.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Cheynikkita on 25 Jul, 2007, 01:44:11
Quote
It actually means "sister souls". I think the difference is too subtle; if you were Greek and wanted to call someone your soul sister, that's what you'd go for.

Do you know if it means brother or sister, or just sister souls?

Chey
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Oblitron on 25 Jul, 2007, 01:57:13
It could be used for two men, two women, or a man and a woman. As Calliope already explained, it means "sister souls", or "brother souls".

No offense, but soul sisters sounds a bit like a female version of the Blues Brothers. Maybe that's how they got their name. :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: F_idάνι on 25 Jul, 2007, 02:11:07
The issue very much lies in the gender of the noun. In greek, nouns have three genders: Masculine, feminine and neutral. The distinction is, usually, just nominal.
''Soul'' in greek happens to be a feminine noun. This is just coincidental.
So, one would say that in greek, ''αδελφές ψυχές'' is the perfect translation for ''sister souls''. Personally, I would love it if me and my sister had a tattoo like this. And we are both Greeks.
However, this expression in greek fits all souls and all genders. Since everybody has a soul, and ''soul'' is a feminine noun in greek, ''αδελφή ψυχή'' can be a brother, a friend or even a partner, no matter what his/ her gender is. Even a soul mate can be called ''αδελφή ψυχή'', although it is not so common in the greek culture to call your partner a ''soul mate''.

PS: Αδελφός= brother, αδελφή=sister, αδελφοί=brothers, αδελφές=sisters, αδέλφια=brothers and/ or sisters
You can substitute ''λ'' with an ''ρ''; it's the same thing.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Cheynikkita on 25 Jul, 2007, 02:12:55
Quote

No offense, but soul sisters sounds a bit like a female version of the Blues Brothers. Maybe that's how they got their name. :)

That's been brought to our attention recently and I do agree, lol.  I actually like "sister souls" better because of that reason.  Thank you everyone for your help.  It's much appreciated.

Chey
Title: GRANDPA
Post by: nrad on 25 Jul, 2007, 03:50:53
My birthday is this coming monday and I plan to get a tattoo in honor of my grandpa(pappou) that passed away 18 years ago.  Aside from mulling over
the actual image, I want to make sure I have an accurate translation and how it appears written in greek letters, modern and ancient if that is possible. 

Thank you

Nick
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Leon on 25 Jul, 2007, 15:37:03
Grandfather in Greek could be written as follows:
ΠΑΠΠΟΥΣ (all capitals)
Παππούς (initial letter capitalised)
παππούς (all lower case).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 25 Jul, 2007, 16:16:37
Grandfather in ancient Greek could be written as follows:
ΠΑΠΠΟΣ (all capitals)
Πάππος (initial letter capitalised)
πάππος (all lower case).

:-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Ghettofu on 25 Jul, 2007, 19:50:04
Hi!
My friend and I both want tattoos in Ancient Greek, we need the following two phrases translated separately, thank you so much! If you could find some fancy/pretty font for it I would also appreciate it! Thank you so much!

1) Are you part of my abyss of my upheaval?

2) To see a world in a grain of sand

Thank you so much!
Title: request translation - undefeated
Post by: Tal-C on 26 Jul, 2007, 23:55:54
hey there guys! you're all doing a fantastic work here!

now, lets get down to buisiness:

i've wanted to translate 3 words to ancient greek, and i think i already managed to get the right translation myself with the site's dictionary for 2 of these words.

i belive that a right translation for 'fearless' is ΑΦΟΒΟΣ, and that 'godless' is ΑΘΕΟΣ. if im wrong - please do correct me!
the final word i need is 'undefeated'. i've managed to find several translations that im not sure if they are accurate...
there's the latin phrase 'INVICTA' which has the same meaning, so if there's anything close to that, i'd like to see it.

oh yeah, if you can, please post it in "capital" letters.


thanks alot for any help offerd, and keep up the good work!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Jul, 2007, 00:16:15
ΑΦΟΒΟΣ
ΑΘΕΟΣ
ΑΜΑΧΗΤΟΣ

is a good trio as all three words appear in Sophocles.
In modern Greek, ΑΗΤΤΗΤΟΣ would be a better word for 'undefeated'.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: sammijcarlos on 27 Jul, 2007, 00:29:55
My sister passed away a few years ago, and I really want to get her name tattooed. Does any one know how her name would look like? Her name is Alexandra Nicole...thanks for all the help! Oh and btw..this site is pretty nifty!

Samantha
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Tal-C on 27 Jul, 2007, 01:02:16
thanks for the quick reply nickel!

for some reason the site's dictionary wont recognize 'ΑΜΑΧΗΤΟΣ'... how is it pronounced?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Jul, 2007, 01:19:18
Sorry, let me improve on that. Go for ΑΝΙΚΗΤΟΣ. It is ΑΝΙΚΑΤΟΣ in Sophocles in the well-known phrase from Antigone "ΕΡΩΣ ΑΝΙΚΑΤΕ ΜΑΧΑΝ", "love unconquered in the fight" (but appears as ΑΝΙΚΗΤΟΣ elsewhere in Sophocles) and has the advantage of still being used in that sense.
It is pronounced a-NEE-ki-tos.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Jul, 2007, 01:22:07
@samantha

"Alexandra Nicole" would be ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΑ ΝΙΚΟΛ (Αλεξάνδρα Νικόλ) in Greek. I can't do much for a French name like Nicole other than transliterate it.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: pocketsk on 27 Jul, 2007, 04:49:03
since i'm kind of a nerd i decided to get a tattoo based on the Dune series of books. One of the main characters, Duke Leto Atreides, is said to be descended directly from Agamemnon and is my favorite character. I will be getting a tattoo of his ducal emblem (a red hawk on a banner of green and black) just below my right collarbone and I would like to have something he said written under it in ancient greek.

The quote is "never forget compassion".

I've tried to look up translations for these words and tried to call upon my high school greek knowledge (which has almost completely abandoned me) and am fed up and would greatly appreciate any help. I realize there are many ways to translate these words and would appreciate a few options, if you don't mind.

thank you very much.
Title: Know thyself and thou shall know all the mysteries of the gods and of the universe
Post by: Wednesday Boy on 27 Jul, 2007, 20:07:11
Hi,
I wanted to get this phrase "Know thyself and thou shall know all the mysteries of the gods and of the universe" as a tattoo and needed some help translating this phrase to Ancient Greek.  And if anyone knows where to find some nice Greek fonts to go along with it, that'd be great.  Thanks for all of your help!

--Adam
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jdropkin on 29 Jul, 2007, 05:34:52
Could someone please give me the correct ancient Greek spelling for the word "pothos" in both the Attic dialect and the koine.  Prefer the dialect of Plato as it was his definition of pothos in the Dialogue of Cratylus that inspired this question and search.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 29 Jul, 2007, 12:57:05
Could someone please give me the correct ancient Greek spelling for the word "pothos" in both the Attic dialect and the koine.  Prefer the dialect of Plato as it was his definition of pothos in the Dialogue of Cratylus that inspired this question and search.

"Pothos" (in Plato and elsewhere) is

πόθος
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: hende116 on 29 Jul, 2007, 22:06:50
I am desperately trying to find an accurate translation of a quote by Marcus Aurelius circa 150 AD, I believe.

The quote is “If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”

I have no idea where to search or who to ask to find how it would have been written during his life, whether it be ancient Greek or Roman or what the symbology for writing it would be.

Any help or direction with this would be greatly appreciated.

Scholastically,
Alec
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 29 Jul, 2007, 23:12:31
quote by Marcus Aurelius

“If it is not right, do not do it; if it is not true, do not say it.”

Εἰ μὴ καθήκει, μὴ πράξῃς· εἰ μὴ ἀληθές ἐστι, μὴ εἴπῃς.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Ghettofu on 30 Jul, 2007, 10:28:28
Hi!
My friend and I both want tattoos in Ancient Greek, we need the following two phrases translated separately, thank you so much! If you could find some fancy/pretty font for it I would also appreciate it! Thank you so much!

1) Are you part of my abyss of my upheaval?

2) To see a world in a grain of sand

Thank you so much!
Title: Re: Know thyself and thou shall know all the mysteries of the gods and of the universe
Post by: Wednesday Boy on 30 Jul, 2007, 20:09:57
Hi,
I wanted to get this phrase "Know thyself and thou shall know all the mysteries of the gods and of the universe" as a tattoo and needed some help translating this phrase to Ancient Greek.  And if anyone knows where to find some nice Greek fonts to go along with it, that'd be great.  Thanks for all of your help!

--Adam

Any ideas?
Title: Re: "know thyself"
Post by: nicenotdim on 31 Jul, 2007, 16:00:14
Hi all,

I'm planning to have a tattoo done and would like the phrase "know thyself" in ancient Greek. The translation I've come across is below:

γνῶθι σεαυτόν

However I wanted to check that this is accurate? Also, would there be anything fundamentally wrong with writing the words across two lines, as below?

γνῶθι
σεαυτόν

Or would this not be something that would have been done in the original ancient Greek?? I don't want to get it wrong!

Thanks in advance for any and all help!
Tim
Title: Re: "know thyself"
Post by: banned8 on 31 Jul, 2007, 18:01:52
γνῶθι σεαυτόν
However I wanted to check that this is accurate? Also, would there be anything fundamentally wrong with writing the words across two lines, as below?
γνῶθι
σεαυτόν

This has been dealt with in the past (https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg22616#msg22616).

ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ is the form that appears in both Xenophon and Stobaeus (i.e. without the E).

The ancients would have written it in upper-case characters. They would have broken any word at any place the moment they got to the edge of the stone etc. So:

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg522.imageshack.us%2Fimg522%2F6365%2Fgnothisautonns9.jpg&hash=4f674977232f75d78c960a8e27d97cfad9acfd51)

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: juan on 01 Aug, 2007, 21:58:07
Wow, perfect! I've been looking into greek translations for a tatoo i was thinking of, and wow, i guess this is the place to be!

looking at translating: "To Eris Human"

Many thanks!
Juan
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 01 Aug, 2007, 22:20:35
To err is human.

Τὸ ἁμαρτάνειν ἀνθρώπινον
Title: "Never Forget Compassion"
Post by: pocketsk on 01 Aug, 2007, 23:42:06
since i'm kind of a nerd i decided to get a tattoo based on the Dune series of books. One of the main characters, Duke Leto Atreides, is said to be descended directly from Agamemnon and is my favorite character. I will be getting a tattoo of his ducal emblem (a red hawk on a banner of green and black) just below my right collarbone and I would like to have something he said written under it in ancient greek.

The quote is "never forget compassion".

I've tried to look up translations for these words and tried to call upon my high school greek knowledge (which has almost completely abandoned me) and am fed up and would greatly appreciate any help. I realize there are many ways to translate these words and would appreciate a few options, if you don't mind.

thank you very much.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: juan on 02 Aug, 2007, 02:19:41
thanks nickel, but I'm actually looking for: "To Eris Human" - using 'Eris' as a double-entendre

cheers,
Juan
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 02 Aug, 2007, 02:37:48
thanks nickel, but I'm actually looking for: "To Eris Human" - using 'Eris' as a double-entendre.

I felt tempted to point out that Eris is the Greek for discord, but I thought that it would be irrelevant. In English, the double entendre would be incomprehensible to anyone unfamiliar with the Greek word or goddess, and probably considered a mistake even by those like me familiar with the Greek word, perhaps because we do not think of the word as a verb. However, if you are happy with it, use it.

Having said that, you probably realise that double-entendres may work in one language but do not always translate into another. Where could one fit Eris into the Greek text?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Stuart14 on 02 Aug, 2007, 09:08:56
Hi Nickel.

Quick question! I realise the ancient Greeks did not use the same calendar system that we use now, so direct date translations are impossible, but is a littreral numerical translation possible?

Would 21/3/2007 translate as ΔΔΙ ΙΙΙ ΧΧΠΙΙ?

Thanks a lot.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 02 Aug, 2007, 15:35:39
Would 21/3/2007 translate as ΔΔΙ ΙΙΙ ΧΧΠΙΙ?
Let me refer you to the discussion that started here: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg86638#msg86638
and to the link mentioned there: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_numerals

Your version combines Greek with Roman numerals.
Try:
λα’ γ’ ‚βζ’
To reiterate: which would not have meant much to the ancients.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: juan on 02 Aug, 2007, 20:11:31
hey Nickel,

Yes, I do realize she is the greek god of strife and discord ;)
I also realize that double entendres rarely work outside one language, just wanting to disguise the meaning, and I also like greek lettering.

So perhaps for simplicities sake, maybe a literal translation of the words "To", "Eris", and "Human" would work?

Thanks again, your help is greatly appreciated.

Juan
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 02 Aug, 2007, 21:31:16
So perhaps for simplicities sake, maybe a literal translation of the words "To", "Eris", and "Human" would work?

Simplicity goes hand in hand with Systran, but not with the aims of this forum. So here's another idea. "To quarrel is human" would be:

Τὸ ἐρίζειν ἀνθρώπινον


(ἐρίζω is the verb from ἔρις, eris, discord)

Now, if you want to be cute about it, you can say:

Τὸ errίζειν ἀνθρώπινον
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: juan on 03 Aug, 2007, 00:32:09
Thanks again nickel, great information to work with. so i must ask, what does "Τὸ errίζειν ἀνθρώπινον" roughly translate to? i'm trying to figure out the 'cuteness' of it ;)

thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 03 Aug, 2007, 00:34:47
It does not translate to anything. I have replaced the Greek "er" in "erizein" (=to quarrel) with the English "err" of the original English "To err is human".
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: juan on 03 Aug, 2007, 00:35:44
ah! haha, cute indeed. cheers mate
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Jane 10 on 03 Aug, 2007, 23:10:36
Hello, I want to get a famous Plato quote translated into ancient greek, could you please translate it for me?
The quote is...

"Music is the movement of sound to reach the soul for the education of its virtue."

Could you also translate 'Plato' into ancient greek please.

Thank you.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 03 Aug, 2007, 23:51:41
“The energy of the mind is the essence of life.” - Aristotle

I was wondering if you might be able to tell me the origin of this quote.  I have searched on my own and have found nothing substantial.  The moderators here seem to have a large amount of resources for situations such as these.  I am also interested in seeing it in it's original text.  Thank you.
See the earlier response in the Ancient Greek Forum here:  https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=7436.0
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Aug, 2007, 20:37:30
Hello, I want to get a famous Plato quote translated into ancient greek, could you please translate it for me?
The quote is...
"Music is the movement of sound to reach the soul for the education of its virtue."
Could you also translate 'Plato' into ancient greek please.
Jane, my first response was to say that this statement could not have been made by Plato, who could never have given such a blanket endorsement to the effects of music;  he consistently expressed his distrust of poets and musicians, who regularly put words, melodies, and gestures together inappropriately.  The resulting mix, in his opinion, tended to lead the young not towards, but away from, virtue.

Nevertheless, the “quote” you cite is all over the Internet, always in those exact words, and always attributed to Plato without reference to a specific text.  The origin of the quotation was finally pointed out to me by Forum administrator nickel (aka The Fontmaster).  It’s from Plato's Laws 673a, and it goes like this:

Τὰ μὲν τοίνυν τῆς φωνῆς μέχρι τῆς ψυχῆς πρὸς ἀρετὴν παιδείας οὐκ οἶδ’ ὅντινα τρόπον ὠνομάσαμεν μουσικήν.

This text refers to a previous discussion of the proper composition and interaction of music and dance, and describes music not as it is commonly practiced (e.g., making instruments independent of, rather than subordinate to, the human voice), but as an ideal.  Here is a more or less literal translation:

“We’ve managed somehow to give the name of music to those properties of the voice [the ‘ movement’ of the voice had just been compared to the movement of the body in choral dance ] which pertain to the education of the soul towards virtue.”

The Jowett translation (still, for most of Plato, the only accessible English version) gives a loose interpretation, which probably became the basis for your quotation:

“And the sound of the voice which reaches and educates the soul, we have ventured to term music.”

So the form of the quotation you cited is not entirely consistent with Plato’s original sense.  Here, as often in literary interpretation, there’s a fine line between confusion and oversimplification.  Sorry to be so long-winded and complex.

Plato’s name in Greek is simpler to convey:  Πλάτων.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ZCHanson on 06 Aug, 2007, 05:41:14
Could anyone translate this phrase for me?

Exhaust the body
Proceed the mind
Cultivate the spirit


thanks in advance!!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 07 Aug, 2007, 23:37:20
@ ZCHansen:
Three phrases, one motto.  And I'm assuming "proceed" means "advance."

τὸ σῶμα ἀντλεῖν
τὸν νοῦν σπεύδειν
τὴν ψυχὴν τρέφειν
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Ghettofu on 08 Aug, 2007, 09:30:11
To whomever it may concern:
I'm new to this but I was wondering if someone could translate the following two phrases for me into ancient Greek. I would really appreciate it. My friend and I are planning to get these tattoos and I just want to make sure we get the correct translation --and this is the perfect forum for it! Thanks!


1) Are you part of my abyss of my upheaval?

2) To see a world in a grain of sand

Thank you so much! Also, if you could provide it in a girlier font, that would be great! thanks!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Aug, 2007, 15:16:37
1) Are you part of my abyss of my upheaval?

2) To see a world in a grain of sand

Thank you so much! Also, if you could provide it in a girlier font, that would be great! thanks!!
Could you elaborate a bit on the first one?  Greek loves specific detail, and that's missing from "my abyss of my upheaval."

As for the second, see the earlier reply at https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg59329/topicseen#msg59329 (reply #681).
Title: NEED HELP WITH TRANSLATION FOR TATOO THANX
Post by: DLC on 08 Aug, 2007, 19:42:41
Hey I was hoping someone could give me some help with a translation I would need to get a tatoo it is ( In The Valley 10 stand united) please if anyone can help that would be much appreciated Thank you in advance.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Aug, 2007, 20:46:33
@ DLC:

Ιn the valley ten stand united =

Ἐν ταῖς πτυχαῖς συνίστανται οἱ δέκα.
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Pegleg2.0 on 09 Aug, 2007, 10:49:55
I was Wondering how to translate "The Only Constant Is Change" into acient greek...?
Title: Never Forget Compassion
Post by: pocketsk on 09 Aug, 2007, 14:58:50
i would greatly appreciate any help in translation this into ancient greek. thanks

"Never Forget Compassion"
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 09 Aug, 2007, 15:52:37
I was Wondering how to translate "The Only Constant Is Change" into acient greek...?
Ultimately, this goes back to Heraclitus.  See https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=9567.0.
Title: Re: Never Forget Compassion
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Aug, 2007, 03:06:21
"Never Forget Compassion"
ΕΛΕΟΥΣ ΜΗΠΟΤΕ ΛΗΘΕΣΘΑΙ             ἐλέους μήποτε λήθεσθαι
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Timothy on 15 Aug, 2007, 04:07:07
In Plutarch, this is:
Γηράσκω δ’ αιεί πολλά διδασκόμενος.
i.e. Γηράσκω / δ' αιεί / πολλά / διδασκόμενος = I grow old / always / many things / being taught.

The better known form of this saying, still often used in modern Greek, is:
Γηράσκω αεί διδασκόμενος.

Does the modern expression translate to "I grow old always being taught"?  Is it just a simplified/common day expression?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mavrodon on 15 Aug, 2007, 06:11:15
Quote
Does the modern expression translate to "I grow old always being taught"?  Is it just a simplified/common day expression?

It is still in use in modern Greek, although the expression is in ancient Greek. This adage, attributed to Socrates, with another saying, also said by Soctrates (έν οίδα ότι ουδέν οίδα = I know only one thing, that I know nothing)  are, to my opinion, the most important quotes one must always bear in mind.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Aug, 2007, 08:53:21
Does the modern expression translate to "I grow old always being taught"?  Is it just a simplified/common day expression?
Yes, that's what it means:  we should never stop learning new things.
The quotation is actually from Solon, the Athenian lawgiver, one of the Seven Sages of ancient Greece (6th century B.C.).  He uses the line to end an elegiac poem to Mimnermus, a fellow poet (fr. 22 Diehl).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mavrodon on 15 Aug, 2007, 09:10:00
The quotation is actually from Solon, the Athenian lawgiver and one of the Seven Sages of ancient Greece (6th century B.C.).  He uses the line to end an elegiac poem to Mimnermus, a fellow poet (fr. 22 Diehl).
If you search Google you will find that this expression is widely attributed to Socrates (see, e.g.http://64.233.183.104/search?q=cache:nIjmNF0naF0J:lyk-peir-irakl.ira.sch.gr/new_page_gr_riseis.htm+%CE%B5%CE%BD+%CE%BF%CE%B9%CE%B4%CE%B1+%CE%BF%CF%84%CE%B9+%CE%BF%CF%85%CE%B4%CE%B5%CE%BD+%CE%BF%CE%B9%CE%B4%CE%B1+%CE%BA%CE%B1%CE%B9+%CF%83%CE%BF%CE%BB%CF%89%CE%BD&hl=el&ct=clnk&cd=2&gl=gr, and http://64.233.183.104/search?q=cache:0lFpCTJPCoUJ:intuitive-facts.blogspot.com/2007_04_01_archive.html+%CE%B5%CE%BD+%CE%BF%CE%B9%CE%B4%CE%B1+%CE%BF%CF%84%CE%B9+%CE%BF%CF%85%CE%B4%CE%B5%CE%BD+%CE%BF%CE%B9%CE%B4%CE%B1+%CE%BA%CE%B1%CE%B9+%CF%83%CE%BF%CE%BB%CF%89%CE%BD&hl=el&ct=clnk&cd=4&gl=gr).  Anyway, Solon lived a couple of centuries before Socrates and, therefore, can claim the copyright!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Aug, 2007, 09:20:53
If you search Google you will find that this expression is widely attributed to Socrates.
Yes, it's always a healthy thing to be reminded of Google's limitations!
At least Plutarch gets it right:  http://el.wikisource.org/wiki/%CE%A3%CF%8C%CE%BB%CF%89%CE%BD. 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: stephibabi1990 on 15 Aug, 2007, 15:10:01
i want to get a tattoo sayin mother in ancient greek but dont know how to write it lol
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Aug, 2007, 18:21:06
i want to get a tattoo sayin mother in ancient greek but dont know how to write it lol
ΜΗΤΗΡ         Lower case:  μήτηρ
Title: courage
Post by: ajr on 17 Aug, 2007, 07:27:05
This thread is amazing. Ok so through a cancellation I got an appointment with an amazing tattoo artist for Sunday. Part of it is going to be courage written in Ancient Greek. I did do a search and found it already translated on this thread but this is where I get confused. It seems to be done 2 different ways.

On this thread I found (θάρρος,ΘΑΡΡΟΣ) and (ΘΑΡΣΟΣ, θάρσος)
Are they both right and i'm just looking like an idiot because I don't know this language?

And whichever is "right" in the context of courage when you are in battle, and the courage of everyday life, is it possible to have it done in these 2 fonts. (I want to give the tattoo artist some options since were not quite sure about placement right now)

https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg67396#msg67396

Thank you so much, you guys are great

edit- being a complete brat could I also see it in this font https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg43027#msg43027
Title: Re: courage
Post by: billberg23 on 17 Aug, 2007, 07:49:50
On this thread I found (θάρρος,ΘΑΡΡΟΣ) and (ΘΑΡΣΟΣ, θάρσος)
Are they both right and i'm just looking like an idiot because I don't know this language?
They're both correct, but Ι'd go for θάρρος,ΘΑΡΡΟΣ, if I were you.  That spelling is peculiar to the ancient Athenian dialect, but it's the one that caught on and became standard for all time (it's the way to say "courage" in modern Greek, too).
The Fontmaster may have time to deal with your font issues later.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Aug, 2007, 11:47:49
Courage. Fontmaster's contribution hereinbelow:

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg458.imageshack.us%2Fimg458%2F7130%2Ftharrosfh0.jpg&hash=3fdaa4fc2144ec10a0df96d5c278f8c8d8a3024d)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: leondari84 on 17 Aug, 2007, 16:31:42
id love to have this translated for a tattoo i want.
thanks
Hi i was just wondering if anyone could help me translate the following words into their Ancient Greek equivalents i would greatly appreciate it thanks :)


Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, Ether

its for a design of a tattoo i am working on :) thank you! :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 17 Aug, 2007, 17:04:44
In the same order, as in Aristotle:

γῆ, ὕδωρ, πῡρ, ἀήρ, αἰθήρ

ΓΗ, ΥΔΩΡ, ΠΥΡ, ΑΗΡ, ΑΙΘΗΡ
Title: Mind, body, spirit
Post by: funkiepunkie on 17 Aug, 2007, 20:31:54
Hi everyone,  I was wondering if someone could help me with the ancient greek translation of the wrods: mind, body, spirit. Thanks so much!
Title: Re: Mind, body, spirit
Post by: billberg23 on 17 Aug, 2007, 20:51:48
Hi everyone,  I was wondering if someone could help me with the ancient greek translation of the wrods: mind, body, spirit. Thanks so much!
Mind:  νοῦς   ΝΟΥΣ
Body:  σῶμα   ΣΩΜΑ
Spirit:  ψυχή   ΨΥΧΗ 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: miii on 18 Aug, 2007, 14:24:58
Hi would you be able to help me with the translation of "Only God Can Judge Me" into ancient greek?


Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Euterpe on 18 Aug, 2007, 18:06:49
I am not an expert, so you may want to wait for someone to confirm...

I think the best way to convey the meaning is to change the sentence a bit.

Κριτής μου ὁ Θεός = God is my judge

Moderator's addition: Do have a look here as well > https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=4185.0
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: ajr on 18 Aug, 2007, 21:08:34
Thank you so much, i printed it off in a lot of sizes so we'll see what works. Appointments tomorrow I promise to post a picture.
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: zwalker1 on 20 Aug, 2007, 00:40:16
Hello, everyone!  I've been reading through this forum, and the help that everyone's been giving has been amazing!
I'm looking to have a biblical verse translated into ancient Greek.  The verse is John 1:5 -

"The Light shineth in Darkness, and the Darkness comprehended it not"

Many thanks in advance to anyone who helps out!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 20 Aug, 2007, 00:53:24
(καὶ) τὸ φῶς ἐν τῇ σκοτίᾳ φαίνει,
καὶ ἡ σκοτία αὐτὸ οὐ κατέλαβεν.


"The Light shineth in Darkness, and the Darkness comprehended it not" (John 1:5)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: zendez on 20 Aug, 2007, 02:03:32
i was hoping you could find the best translation to the phrase, "for my mothers." Recently, two of my bestfriends have lost their mothers, who i would proudly call my own, to cancer. I also have experienced the loss a parent. The meaning of this is phrase is a dedication; to hold strong and never give up. A lesson i learned from my mothers, is now for my mothers. If you could please help me, I would deeply appreciate it. I've cross-checked other online translations, but keep finding faults, but this site seems to folllow through pretty well. After all, it is a commemoritve tattoo, i want to make sure whats under my skin is what i want. Besides, the language is so beautiful

PLEASE HELP,
Mikey Z
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 20 Aug, 2007, 02:28:15
i was hoping you could find the best translation to the phrase, "for my mothers."
Ancient Greek would probably have it this way: ταῖς μητράσιν ("for the mothers").
Our condolences to you and your friends.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: zwalker1 on 20 Aug, 2007, 05:18:32
(καὶ) τὸ φῶς ἐν τῇ σκοτίᾳ φαίνει,
καὶ ἡ σκοτία αὐτὸ οὐ κατέλαβεν.


"The Light shineth in Darkness, and the Darkness comprehended it not" (John 1:5)

thank you so much!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: wanderer11 on 21 Aug, 2007, 05:25:44
I've been trying to find the English translation of a tattoo I saw in ancient greek:  hen oida oti ouden oida.  Sorry, I'm not sure how to get the characters, but I'm getting desperate.  Or any suggestions where else I could get the translation?  Thanks so much.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 21 Aug, 2007, 05:30:24
I've been trying to find the English translation of a tattoo I saw in ancient Greek:  hen oida oti ouden oida... Any suggestions where else I could get the translation?

Here (https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=918.0).

Also:
I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance. http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Socrates
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Timothy on 21 Aug, 2007, 10:49:47
Γηράσκω αεί διδασκόμενος.

How is this pronounced?  I am still learning the basics of pronunciation and I'd like to see how close I am.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 21 Aug, 2007, 17:36:06
Γηράσκω αεί διδασκόμενος.

How is this pronounced?  I am still learning the basics of pronunciation and I'd like to see how close I am.  Thanks.
Stressed syllables are in italics:

Yee-rah-sko  ah-ee  thee-thah-sko-meh-noss

(Pronounce th as in "this."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jazzmin on 22 Aug, 2007, 21:40:45
could someone please translate Faith for me?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mavrodon on 22 Aug, 2007, 22:37:45
ΠΙΣΤΙΣ, in ancient and formal Greek. ΠΙΣΤΗ, in modern Greek (Capital letters)
πίστις and πίστη (lower case letters)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Euterpe on 24 Aug, 2007, 06:48:15
Stressed syllables are in italics:

Yee-rah-sko  ah-ee  thee-thah-sko-meh-noss

(Pronounce th as in "this."

It is very interesting. I've learned another pronunciation.
Gay-rah-sko  ah-ay  dee-dah-sko-meh-nos
"r" is rolled.

I know it is mostly guess work anyway, but is this the most recent "scholarly" version? Do you have an article for me to read or a reference work?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 24 Aug, 2007, 07:15:31
It is very interesting. I've learned another pronunciation.
Gay-rah-sko  ah-ay  dee-dah-sko-meh-nos
"r" is rolled.

I know it is mostly guess work anyway, but is this the most recent "scholarly" version? Do you have an article for me to read or a reference work?
Since Timothy quoted the short version (the one that's current in Greece today), I assumed he wanted the modern Greek pronunciation, and that's what I gave him.

The pronunciation you cite, Euterpe, would be the theoretical "Erasmian" pronunciation, i.e., the way Greek sounded (supposedly) in the classical period.  Ordinarily, I give only the modern Greek pronunciation, since it's the only authentic one we actually have.

The ancient Greek form of the quotation from Solon is Γηράσκω δ' ἀεὶ πολλά διδασκόμενος — "Βut I grow old always learning many things."

A decent, fairly comprehensive article on Greek pronunciation through the ages is by R. Whitney Tucker, "Chronology of Greek Sound Changes," American Journal of Philology 90 (1969), 36-47.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Euterpe on 24 Aug, 2007, 08:09:29
Oups, sorry! Since we are in the Ancient Greek part, I did not even think that you might give the modern pronunciation, which I do not know by the way^^
Thanks.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: franc on 24 Aug, 2007, 19:02:05
 Also want a tatoo, would it be possible to show in ancient greek script the following: "do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law". I realise this is problematic due to the poetic/archaic nature of the phrase in english but would be highly appreciative if you can do anything with it, cheers
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 24 Aug, 2007, 22:36:22
Also want a tatoo, would it be possible to show in ancient greek script the following: "do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law".
Τὸ δὲ ποιεῖν ὦνπερ ἂν ἐπιθυμῇς, οὗτος ὁ πᾶς ἔστω νόμος.
Title: Hermione
Post by: marnieromy on 27 Aug, 2007, 00:52:15
my daughters name is Hermione  I would like to get a tattoo done of it translated to Greek. Please could somebody show me what it is?

Also, my other daughters name is Romy  and I would like that done too! Can this be translated?

many thanks

Title: Re: Hermione
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Aug, 2007, 01:27:06
my daughters name is Hermione  I would like to get a tattoo done of it translated to Greek. Please could somebody show me what it is?
Also, my other daughters name is Romy  and I would like that done too! Can this be translated?
ΕΡΜΙΩΝΗ  upper case,  Ἑρμιώνη  lower case

ΡΩΜΥ  (Ῥώμυ), I think, would do for Romy, assuming the name has some roots in ancient history.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: marnieromy on 27 Aug, 2007, 01:33:46
Thank you!

I am not sure that Romy does have any ancient history roots! How about translating it into modern Greek??
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 27 Aug, 2007, 02:47:22
Romy in modern Greek–

Various ways of transliterating:

ΡΟΜΙ / Ρόμι (according to the new rules)

ΡΟΜΥ / Ρόμυ (according to the older rules)

ΡΟΜΗ / Ρόμη (if it becomes a conjugated Greek name)
Title: The most powerful weapon on earth is the Human soul on fire. -> Το ισχυρότερο όπλο στη γη είναι η φλεγόμενη ανθρώπινη ψυχή.
Post by: Caol on 27 Aug, 2007, 04:04:23
 I was wondering if I could get a translation for "The most powerful weapon on earth, is the Human soul on fire".
Thanks for your help.
Title: Re: Translation
Post by: banned8 on 27 Aug, 2007, 04:28:20
"The most powerful weapon on earth, is the Human soul on fire"

Το ισχυρότερο όπλο στη γη είναι η φλεγόμενη ανθρώπινη ψυχή. (Modern Greek)
Title: Courage is knowing what not to fear/For many are called, but few are chosen
Post by: xanthe on 27 Aug, 2007, 05:26:01
Hello,

I am so glad I stumbled upon this site. I am getting a tattoo this coming Saturday and I have a couple of phrases I am mulling over. I would love for them to be in Greek (modern or ancient). If you could please translate these for me, I would be more than grateful. I'm not sure if it matters when you translate, but I'm a female.

1: Courage is knowing what not to fear. - Plato

2: For many are called, but few are chosen. - Matthew 22:14

3: Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. - Anon

Thank you once again!

Title: Re: Courage is knowing what not to fear/For many are called, but few are chosen
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Aug, 2007, 06:22:48
2: For many are called, but few are chosen. - Matthew 22:14
Πολλοὶ γάρ εἰσιν κλητοί, ὀλίγοι δὲ ἐκλεκτοί.
ΠΟΛΛΟΙ ΓΑΡ ΕΙΣΙΝ ΚΛΗΤΟΙ, ΟΛΙΓΟΙ ΔΕ ΕΚΛΕΚΤΟΙ

The other two quotations may need harder work.  We'll see what others come up with.
Title: Re: Translation
Post by: Caol on 27 Aug, 2007, 06:23:11
How accurate is this translation if you don't mind me asking.
Thanks for your help.
Title: Re: The most powerful weapon on earth is the Human soul on fire. -> Το ισχυρότερο όπλο στη γη είναι η φλεγόμενη ανθρώπινη ψυχή.
Post by: wings on 27 Aug, 2007, 11:08:33
Hi, Caol.

It is very accurate and almost literal.
Title: Re: Courage is knowing what not to fear/For many are called, but few are chosen
Post by: xanthe on 27 Aug, 2007, 13:55:06
Πολλοὶ γάρ εἰσιν κλητοί, ὀλίγοι δὲ ἐκλεκτοί.
ΠΟΛΛΟΙ ΓΑΡ ΕΙΣΙΝ ΚΛΗΤΟΙ, ΟΛΙΓΟΙ ΔΕ ΕΚΛΕΚΤΟΙ

The other two quotations may need harder work.  We'll see what others come up with.

Thank you! :D Is that the literal translation?
Title: Re: Courage is knowing what not to fear/For many are called, but few are chosen
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Aug, 2007, 15:48:50
Thank you! :D Is that the literal translation?
It's no translation at all.  It"s the original Greek.  Matthew wrote in Greek.  The King James bible translation that you quote is a literal translation into English.
Title: Re: The most powerful weapon on earth is the Human soul on fire. -> Το ισχυρότερο όπλο στη γη είναι η φλεγόμενη ανθρώπινη ψυχή.
Post by: Caol on 27 Aug, 2007, 16:42:19
Thank very much then.
Title: Re: The most powerful weapon on earth is the Human soul on fire. -> Το ισχυρότερο όπλο στη γη είναι η φλεγόμενη ανθρώπινη ψυχή.
Post by: Caol on 27 Aug, 2007, 16:52:14
Its for a tattoo...well yeah it's for a tattoo.
I was trying to ask just incase peoplea re sick of doing tat translations.
How do you pronounce "Το ισχυρότερο όπλο στη γη είναι η φλεγόμενη ανθρώπινη ψυχή" aswell, if you dont mind me asking.
THanks again.
Title: How to Pronounce
Post by: Caol on 27 Aug, 2007, 18:58:03
Το ισχυρότερο όπλο στη γη είναι η φλεγόμενη ανθρώπινη ψυχή

How does one say that.

Thanks for your help.
Title: Re: How to Pronounce
Post by: wings on 27 Aug, 2007, 19:02:32
Dear Caol, your previous message has been moved to: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg90210/boardseen.html#new

Please search the forum topics before you post a new question on existing threads.
Title: Re: How to Pronounce
Post by: Caol on 27 Aug, 2007, 20:35:21
Sorry about that
Title: Re: How to Pronounce
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Aug, 2007, 22:45:32
Το ισχυρότερο όπλο στη γη είναι η φλεγόμενη ανθρώπινη ψυχή

How does one say that.
toh ees-hee-ro-teh-ro o-plo stee yee ee-neh ee fleh-gho-meh-nee ahn-thro-pee-nee psee-hee

(accemted syllables in bold type)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: MeAgainstTheMusic on 27 Aug, 2007, 23:58:32
If someone can translate the following quote into Ancient Greek that would be awesome!!!!!!!!!

"No one holds command over me. No man. No god. No price."

PLEASSSSSSSSEEEEE!!!
thanks!!!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: xuxu on 28 Aug, 2007, 00:23:47
I want to make a tattoo with this words.Can you confirm what the mean?
πεπρωμένο
πυρκαγιά
άγγελος
θάρρος
ζωή
θεά

And how do i write Diana(portuguese name) and this phrase: "It doesn´t matter how big the mountain is because it can´t hide the sun"

Thank you guys
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Πρωτέαs on 28 Aug, 2007, 00:39:22
πεπρωμένο = destiny
πυρκαγιά = fire
άγγελος = angel
θάρρος = courage
ζωή = life
θεά = goddess
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 28 Aug, 2007, 02:33:09
I"No one holds command over me. No man. No god. No price."
Ἐμοῦ οὐ δεσπόζει οὔτ' ἄνθρωπος οὔτε θεὸς οὔτε μισθός.
Title: Re: Courage is knowing what not to fear/For many are called, but few are chosen
Post by: xanthe on 28 Aug, 2007, 02:47:55
It's no translation at all.  It"s the original Greek.  Matthew wrote in Greek.  The King James bible translation that you quote is a literal translation into English.

Ah, I see. Thank you very much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: MeAgainstTheMusic on 28 Aug, 2007, 23:24:29
thanks!!!!!!!
Just one question. I ask only b/c this will be tattooed and uhm... I don't want it to be wrong. I don't doubt your translation, I am greatful.
I've seen a different greek word for "man" - ἀνδρί.
Is there a reson why its different?
One other thing is there a reason this "no" - οὔτ' is different than - οὔτε?

Ἐμοῦ οὐ δεσπόζει οὔτ' ἄνθρωπος οὔτε θεὸς οὔτε μισθός

Just wondering!!! but thank you though!!!!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 29 Aug, 2007, 04:38:16
I've seen a different greek word for "man" - ἀνδρί.
Is there a reson why its different?
One other thing is there a reason this "no" - οὔτ' is different than - οὔτε?

Ἐμοῦ οὐ δεσπόζει οὔτ' ἄνθρωπος οὔτε θεὸς οὔτε μισθός
Ἀνδρί is the dative case of ἀνήρ, the word for "man" as a masculine personage.  I chose ἄνθρωπος, the word for "man" as a human being, since it seemed to contrast well with "god."
Οὔτε normally drops the final epsilon before a word beginning with a vowel, though it's not absolutely necessary if you don't like the contraction.  You could certainly get away with οὔτε ἄνθρωπος (or οὔτε ἀνὴρ, for that matter).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: MeAgainstTheMusic on 29 Aug, 2007, 04:45:26
I like it the way you translated... I was just curious.
Thank you sooooo much!!!!
I'm the type to always question everything only because I love learning new things...
Thanks!!
Title: Fonts
Post by: sweden on 01 Sep, 2007, 00:40:29
Hi,
My name is Ronny and I’m going to get a tattoo the next time I come to Greece (I live in Sweden). Below you see my kids name spelled in Greek letters. I would like to have it written with a font called Old English Text MT (Old English Text MT).
Is this possible?

Best Regards

Ronny Tzigounakis

Ηλιας Αλεξανδρος
Title: Re: Fonts
Post by: Euterpe on 01 Sep, 2007, 03:02:41
Unless I am mistaken, I don't think it is possible... I've just tried in Word and I don't think this font includes "symbols" such as the Greek alphabet.

You may want to play with Word and see if you like something else...
Title: Re: Fonts
Post by: wings on 01 Sep, 2007, 09:43:40
Hi, Ronny.

This font does not work with Greek characters.
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: buns1988 on 03 Sep, 2007, 21:24:12
I am looking to get a tattoo within the next couple days and I need help with a translation.  I want to translate the quote "Nothing is impossible to him who will try" to Ancient Greek.  If someone could help me out with the upper case and lower case translation that would be great. Thanks.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 03 Sep, 2007, 21:40:30
I want to translate the quote "Nothing is impossible to him who will try" to Ancient Greek.

Please see https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg51361#msg51361
and https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg60836#msg60836
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: buns1988 on 04 Sep, 2007, 20:59:05
Thank you very much
Title: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mishl8 on 05 Sep, 2007, 07:20:15
I was wondering if someone can give me the acient greek translation for this quote  "There are only two remedies for the suffering of the soul: Hope and Patience"     Also if the is any way that it can be written big enough for me to trace for a tat.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 05 Sep, 2007, 16:57:28
I was wondering if someone can give me the acient greek translation for this quote  "There are only two remedies for the suffering of the soul: Hope and Patience"     Also if the is any way that it can be written big enough for me to trace for a tat.
This quotation is all over the Web in English, sometimes attributed to Socrates, sometimes to Pythagoras, usually to no one.  It may be one of those popular sentiments that one or more people have decided to dignify by connecting it with a famous name from antiquity. (Though often, right after I've made such a statement, someone will come forward to prove me wrong — so let's not lose hope altogether!)
 If you really need to have it with Greek letters, and are OK with modern Greek, you might try posting your question on the "English-Greek" section of this site.  Otherwise, here are the ancient Greek words for "hope" and "patience" in capital letters (to make it easy for you and/or your tattooist to draw them):

Ε Λ Π Ι Σ                                            Υ Π Ο Μ Ο Ν Η

The "suffering of the soul," by the way, would be difficult to say in the dead language.  Ancient Greek would probably need to specify what the soul was suffering from.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: abracapocs on 06 Sep, 2007, 00:36:44
Hi I'm a soldier and was wanting to get a "with your shield or on it" tattoo.  and I've been trying to get all these sites to translate it but have been having no luck.  Is there any way i could get some help here.  Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mishl8 on 06 Sep, 2007, 02:05:29
Hi I posted a message earlier about the translation of "There are only two remedies for the suffering of the soul: Hope and Patience"  I was told that it could not be fully translated into ancient Greek (which is ok).  I got a translation for it from another website "   Υπάρχουν μόνο δύο θεραπείες για το βάσανο της ψυχής: Ελπίδα και υπομονή   " and wondered if this is modern Greek or ancient and if it says what it supposed to.  Also does anyone know how I can enlarge these Greek letters and make them kinda fancy?? sort of.  Sorry all the questions I just want this tattoo to be perfect. I really apreciate any help that I can get.  Thank you!!!!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Euterpe on 06 Sep, 2007, 02:24:35
This is a famous quote from the Moralia by Plutarch. It was allegedly said by Spartan women before their sons, husbands, etc would leave for war since it was better to be dead than a coward. However, Plutarch wrote this many centuries after the fact. So it is part of the lore about Spartans!

The Greek saying is "either with this [shield] or on it" and it has been discussed here.
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=925.0
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=5293.0
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 06 Sep, 2007, 02:38:00
  I got a translation for it from another website "   Υπάρχουν μόνο δύο θεραπείες για το βάσανο της ψυχής: Ελπίδα και υπομονή   " and wondered if this is modern Greek or ancient and if it says what it supposed to.  Also does anyone know how I can enlarge these Greek letters and make them kinda fancy?? sort of.
Mish18, this is beautiful modern Greek.  Yes, it says just what you want it to say.  The Fontmaster may have time to help you make it look kinda fancy, sort of.  :-)))
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: abracapocs on 06 Sep, 2007, 02:44:48
Thank you
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Sep, 2007, 03:25:08
There are only two remedies
for the suffering of the soul:
Hope and Patience

My more poetic version (Modern Greek also):

Δύο είναι τα φάρμακα
για της ψυχής τα πάθη:
ελπίδα και υπομονή.



Enlargement and copying techniques:

From your browser's View menu, Zoom to an appropriate size.
Press PrintScreen and open Windows' Paint program.
Control-V will paste the screen there.
Use the Frame tool (top right) to pick the part of the screen that you need.
Press Control-C to copy, Control-N for New and Control-V to paste the chosen frame into the new screen.
Save or print as required.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: mishl8 on 06 Sep, 2007, 21:15:02
Thanks so much for your help guys  :-)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: bwilliams85 on 08 Sep, 2007, 00:59:14
Hi all I came across this site in a search and Im looking to get a tattoo in greek or ancient greek of either "self discipline" or "disciplined" or some phrase or saying that includes this word, anybody know of any good ones? If someone could translate it for me in both I would really appreciate it. Im not Greek but I dont just want to get it in just english and I definitely dont want a Chinese symbol like alot of other Caucasian people have. Anyone have any opinions on this? And thanks for the translation- I'd appreciate it.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Sep, 2007, 03:08:50
Im looking to get a tattoo in greek or ancient greek of either "self discipline" or "disciplined" or some phrase or saying that includes this word
See https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.825.html (Reply #833).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rukkus on 09 Sep, 2007, 23:48:09
So I was wondering if this word would translate into ancient greek. Affliction ... there are different definitions for it, but the meaning that i am looking for would be this... a cause of mental or bodily pain, as sickness, loss, calamity, or persecution. Really any word to that effect would be good. Just thought that word might be the best. Thank you for your help
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Sep, 2007, 00:22:00
Affliction ... there are different definitions for it, but the meaning that i am looking for would be this... a cause of mental or bodily pain, as sickness, loss, calamity, or persecution.
ΠΗΜΑ (πῆμα) might be the word you're looking for.  It's whatever "pain" causes πάθος (suffering) to the body or mind.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rukkus on 10 Sep, 2007, 01:22:29
Alright cool. So does it literally mean pain or does it just mean... the cause of suffering to the body or mind. So in other words if this were a tattoo would it kind of be labeling me as the cause of suffering to the body or mind? As starnge as it may sound, thats kind of what I'm looking for lol. Thank you by the way.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 10 Sep, 2007, 01:28:53
Well, the big dictionary of Ancient Greek that we use says that it means "bane, calamity", so this could well be spot on. But it's not the sort of Greek that Greeks would go around using these days.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Sep, 2007, 01:51:42
So does it literally mean pain or does it just mean... the cause of suffering to the body or mind.
It means both.  You asked for the word for "a cause of mental or bodily pain," and I took you literally.  Πῆμα is the word Priam uses to describe Achilles in the Iliad — "a bane to the Trojans" — and it's what Hesiod calls a bad neighbor.  "A pain in the ass," we might say.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rukkus on 10 Sep, 2007, 02:57:05
alright thank you all very much. What would the greeks use now a days to describe something like that?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Sep, 2007, 04:11:18
What would the greeks use now a days to describe something like that?
Ταλαιπωρία is a good word for "hardship" or "misery" in both ancient and modern Greek.  In the ancient language, however, the emphasis was more on physical hardship.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rukkus on 10 Sep, 2007, 07:40:42
alright one more  "to prevail" or something to that extent.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Sep, 2007, 16:50:40
alright one more  "to prevail" or something to that extent.
Νικᾶν (NIKAN) "to win," κρατεῖν (KΡΑΤΕΙΝ) "to overcome," ἰσχύειν (ΙΣΧΥΕΙΝ) "to be stronger."
By the way, on the subject of "the cause of suffering," I forgot to mention the famous word ἄλγος (ΑΛΓΟΣ), used in the introductory verses of both the Iliad and the Odyssey.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rukkus on 10 Sep, 2007, 22:45:01
Alright awesome you guys have been a big help. Im thinking about getting this tattooed down my triceps. perhaps κρατεῖν on one tricep and on the other the word adversity, or challenge something like that depending on what the translation looks like. Would these words be fine being written from top to bottom?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Sep, 2007, 23:38:13
Would these words be fine being written from top to bottom?
Absolutely, as long as you use upper case.  Lower case will be a problem with all those accents.
ΠΗΜΑ would be O.K. for "adversity," too, but if you're using it as the object of ΚΡΑΤΕΙΝ, you'll have to change the form to ΠΗΜΑΤΟΣ.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rukkus on 11 Sep, 2007, 01:46:14
Awesome do you think you can do the two words in a jpg going down? or is there somewhere i can do that? Also would if there is a place would i be able to mess with the fonts? the two words ΠΗΜΑΤΟΣ and κρατεῖν. maybe try both in upper case and lower case even though it may be harder to do in lowercase due to the accents.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Sep, 2007, 01:58:42
maybe try both in upper case and lower case even though it may be harder to do in lowercase due to the accents.
Not just harder, but more confusing to the reader as well.  Since the accents (in your case the acute and the circumflex) have to be written above the letter, they will look like separate letters.
The Fontmaster may be able to help you with the jpg, though I've never heard of a font system that arranges letters vertically.  Why not just draw them yourself, carefully, in upper case?  After all, the ancient Greeks had to do everything free-hand!  :-)))
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rukkus on 11 Sep, 2007, 09:43:20
lol alright cool i can do that. Can you show me how they both look in upper and lower case please?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 11 Sep, 2007, 15:24:16
lol alright cool i can do that. Can you show me how they both look in upper and lower case please?
Π Η Μ Α Τ Ο Σ                                π ή μ α τ ο ς

Κ Ρ Α Τ Ε Ι Ν                                  κ ρ α τ ε ῖ ν
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: rukkus on 11 Sep, 2007, 18:13:32
thanks a lot bro
Title: evangelist
Post by: hesgotmysoul on 11 Sep, 2007, 21:57:40
i love the new testament greek and looking to get my first tattoo.  i was thinking of getting "evangelist" in greek and what i found was εὐαγγέλιον meaning "good" and "i bring a message"....does this translate to i bring a good message??? i'm a christian and have been called to missions and feel that this is where my life is headed and want to be marked as an accountability to my life's path.  i just wanted to get a confirmation on this if possible.  if there is anything else that could mean something similar that would be amazing as well.  i am just looking for something that is faith-based and accurate. thank you so much for any help that can be given.

jen
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 11 Sep, 2007, 22:04:18
εὐαγγέλιον = gospel
εὐαγγελίζομαι = bring good tidings
εὐαγγελιστής = bringer of good tidings, evangelist


The prefix "ευ" means "good".
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: bwilliams85 on 12 Sep, 2007, 04:41:49
I looked at the thread you linked me and I didnt really see anything in there that interested me so....

I searched to find the ancient greek word for "discipline" and I found-

    πειθαρχία   and

          τιμωρώ


Can someone verify that these both mean discipline? And is this ancient greek or modern greek?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Sep, 2007, 05:58:01
I searched to find the ancient greek word for "discipline" and I found-
    πειθαρχία   and
          τιμωρώ

Can someone verify that these both mean discipline? And is this ancient greek or modern greek?
Both words exist in both ancient and modern Greek:  πειθαρχία means "obedience," and τιμωρώ means "I avenge."  The message I referred you to (Reply # 833) mentioned σωφροσύνη, the word for self-discipline (I'd thought you had requested a translation for that in ancient Greek).  The message also alludes to the Delphic appeal for self-discipline, ΜΗΔΕΝ ΑΓΑΝ (Nothing Too Much).  
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: bwilliams85 on 12 Sep, 2007, 06:06:24
Ok well than Im glad I found this site before just trusting that other site that gave me the wrong words....Im looking at getting this tattooed down my side....is there any other options for it, as far as ancient or modern and upper or lower case? And you gave me "self discipline" but is there a word for just "discipline" or disciplined? Thanks alot
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Sep, 2007, 08:41:48
....is there any other options for it, as far as ancient or modern and upper or lower case? And you gave me "self discipline" but is there a word for just "discipline" or disciplined?
Upper case:  ΣΩΦΡΟΣΥΝΗ
Disciplined (well-ordered) = ΕΥΤΑΚΤΟΣ       εὔτακτος
Discipline (good order) = ΕΥΤΑΞΙΑ        εὐταξία
                  (all ancient Greek)
Title: only the dead have seen the end of war
Post by: flightmedic on 12 Sep, 2007, 13:00:04
Plato's phrase "only the dead have seen the end of war". I'm thinking about getting this as a tattoo. As that I'm leaving again for next deployment to Afghanistan/ Iraq.
Thanks,
Josh
Title: Re: only the dead have seen the end of war
Post by: wings on 12 Sep, 2007, 13:03:24
Josh, please read the forum rules carefully (yellow button on top of each page) before posting questions.

As for tattoos, there is a special thread and I am going to move your question there.
Title: Re: only the dead have seen the end of war
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Sep, 2007, 16:06:33
Plato's phrase "only the dead have seen the end of war".
Josh, see https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.945 (Reply # 945).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: flightmedic on 12 Sep, 2007, 16:24:50
Thank you. I found that article on the net as well. Would you still be able to translate into ancient Greek for me? I didn't see that done in the prior thread, I'm to this so I might have missed it though. Could I also have the word for freedom in ancient Greek?

Thank you again.

Josh
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Sep, 2007, 17:30:07
Would you still be able to translate into ancient Greek for me?  Could I also have the word for freedom in ancient Greek?
Οἰ κατθανόντες μόνοι ἑώρακαν τέλος πολέμου.

(That's a version in ancient Greek.  Something tells me, however, that modern Greek would say it more beautifully.  One of the true hellenophones here may come forward with a translation.)

The proud word for freedom is the same in both ancient and modern Greek:

Ἐλευθερία                                         ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΙΑ

Stay safe, Josh, and come home soon!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Hoplite16 on 14 Sep, 2007, 18:22:43
"Live Together, Die Alone"

Ancient Greek translation would be greatly appreciated...
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 14 Sep, 2007, 21:18:29
"Live Together, Die Alone"
Κοινῶς μὲν βιοῦν, χωρὶς δὲ θανεῖν
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: plato on 17 Sep, 2007, 13:33:45
Upper case:  ΣΩΦΡΟΣΥΝΗ
Disciplined (well-ordered) = ΕΥΤΑΚΤΟΣ       εὔτακτος
Discipline (good order) = ΕΥΤΑΞΙΑ        εὐταξία
                  (all ancient Greek)
Modern greek -> πειθαρχία           ΠΕΙΘΑΡΧΙΑ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: driki on 18 Sep, 2007, 22:52:44
Would love if someone could help me get this translated:

"Liars when they speak the truth are not believed."
Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC), from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

I'm thinking of getting this as a reminder so I don't slip up.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Sep, 2007, 00:19:12
Would love if someone could help me get this translated:

"Liars when they speak the truth are not believed."
Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC), from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
Here is the original Greek of Diogenes, Book 5, para. 17:

Ἐρωτηθεὶς τί περιγίνεται κέρδος τοῖς ψευδομένοις, "ὅταν," ἔφη,
"λέγωσιν ἀλήθειαν, μὴ πιστεύεσθαι."

(When asked what reward people get for lying, [Aristotle] responded, "Not to be believed when they're telling the truth")
Title: What doesn't kill me makes me stronger
Post by: greekhillbilly on 25 Sep, 2007, 01:18:15
Hi, I am wanting to get a new tatoo but want to get it written in greek.  "WHAT DOESN'T KILL ME MAKES ME STONGER"   If i can get that all in caps that would be wonderful. Thank You, Petros
Title: Re: translation help
Post by: F_idάνι on 25 Sep, 2007, 01:57:43
Why don't you use the ''search'' buttons? There are two of them at the top of this page, one on the right and the other one on the left. You can't miss them. This question is among the most popular in this forum, so you should come up with something interesting. If not, we are here to help you.

(By the way, the forum rules are pretty strict about the topic of our posts. Spare a moment reading them, and we'll be happy to spare much more time to help you.)

Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: What doesn't kill me makes me stronger
Post by: greekhillbilly on 25 Sep, 2007, 02:16:48
thank you very much, Petros
Title: "My faithful son, remember your courage with each step"
Post by: ElliasThe Brave on 01 Oct, 2007, 19:25:10
People of Greece and People of Ink - I salute you all!

I was wondering whether someone could translate the title of my reply into Ancient Greek, put it in a nice FONT and tell me how to pronounce it phonetically.

I thank you all from the bottom of my heart.

Elias The Brave
Title: Re: "My faithful son, remember your courage with each step"
Post by: billberg23 on 02 Oct, 2007, 02:52:10
"My faithful son, remember your courage with each step"

ΠΙΣΤΕ ΜΟΥ ΠΑΙ, ΘΑΡΡΟΣ ΦΥΛΑΣΣΟΥ ΒΑΔΙΖΩΝ

Πιστέ μου παῖ, θάρρος φυλάσσου βαδίζων


Belated pronunciation guide:  pee-steh moo peh, thah-ross fee-lah-soo vah-dee-zown
(accented syllables in bold type)

Saludos from the inkwell, Elias!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Slowens on 06 Oct, 2007, 23:48:50
There is a phrase from the odyssey that I wish to have translated into ancient Greek. When Odysseus blinds the cyclops and he asks him who it is. Odysseus replies "I am no one" I'd like to have that translated. Thanks
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 07 Oct, 2007, 00:14:13
There is a phrase from the odyssey that I wish to have translated into ancient Greek. When Odysseus blinds the cyclops and he asks him who it is. Odysseus replies "I am no one" I'd like to have that translated. Thanks
No need to have it translated into ancient Greek, since the original phrase is already in ancient Greek (Homer, Odyssey 9.366):

Οὖτις ἐμοί γ' ὄνομα
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: orson on 08 Oct, 2007, 15:30:20
HELP

hi ...

im from indonesia and i want to have my parents name tattoo on me .... is it possible to translate it since i been google it but nver found one ... my dads name is MENARTO TJAHJADI and my moms name is LARAS O'GABI SALIM .... is that possible ?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: orson on 08 Oct, 2007, 15:31:31
o yea ... is ancient greek same with hebrew ? cheers .... im planning to tattoo it vertically ... can hebrew read vertically ? cheers
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Euterpe on 08 Oct, 2007, 16:17:32
Ancient Greek and Hebrew are two very different languages.
Here is an article about Hebrew: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_language
Here about ancient Greek: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek

If you're going for a certain aesthetic style, here is the Hebrew alphabet http://www.orbilat.com/General_References/Images/Hebrew_alphabet.gif
Here is the Greek alphabet http://www.greeka.com/greece-language/alphabet.gif
Title: Spartan
Post by: jamie1500m on 09 Oct, 2007, 15:28:38
I would like to get the word "SPARTAN" translated into Ancient Greek.

The reason for this is so I can have it tattooed onto the top of my thigh!!

Could anyone help me out?!?!?

Cheers

Jamie
Title: Re: Spartan
Post by: wings on 09 Oct, 2007, 15:35:13
Jamie, I am moving your question to the correct thread: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.0

Please use the "search" option to see if it has already been answered.
Title: Re: Spartan
Post by: billberg23 on 09 Oct, 2007, 17:02:21
I would like to get the word "SPARTAN" translated into Ancient Greek.
See  https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg54857;topicseen#msg54857

and

https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg67560;topicseen#msg67560
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Mengsk on 10 Oct, 2007, 17:31:16
Hi, can anyone help me translate this phrase of words "feel no regrets by yourself", i'm looking for this phrase of words for my tattoo, thx a lot
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Oct, 2007, 17:52:33
Hi, can anyone help me translate this phrase of words "feel no regrets by yourself", i'm looking for this phrase of words for my tattoo, thx a lot
Can you tell us what you mean by "by yourself"?  And to whom does it refer?

For "I have no regrets,"  see  https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.msg41558#msg41558  (Reply #424).
Title: Re: Have passion in all you do
Post by: Redsteel on 11 Oct, 2007, 18:10:27
sorry i want to get a tattoo of this

Να έχεις πάθος για ό,τι κάνεις.

Να παθιάζεσαι με ό,τι κάνεις.


do they both mean the same thing? or do u need both to make the sentence?

Title: Re: Have passion in all you do
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Oct, 2007, 04:50:59
Να έχεις πάθος για ό,τι κάνεις.
Να παθιάζεσαι με ό,τι κάνεις.

do they both mean the same thing? or do u need both to make the sentence?
They're both modern Greek, Redsteel, and they both mean pretty much the same thing.  Is modern Greek what you want?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jjoosshh on 13 Oct, 2007, 18:58:23
I saw earlier a translation for "I live, I love, I laugh"

It was Ζω Αγαπώ Γελώ.

I was wondering if it would be possible for anyone to show me this in different fonts and also capitalized or all lower case, just different variations really.

Thanks in advance for your help, this forum is alot of help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Euterpe on 13 Oct, 2007, 22:52:51
I think this is modern Greek, not ancient Greek. Is this what you want?
Title: Re: Have passion in all you do
Post by: oblivia on 15 Oct, 2007, 13:41:45
sorry i want to get a tattoo of this

Να έχεις πάθος για ό,τι κάνεις.

Να παθιάζεσαι με ό,τι κάνεις.


do they both mean the same thing? or do u need both to make the sentence?



Hi.the first sentence means ALMOSt the same with the second one.
The first emphasises on the passion one must have in whatever he does,before he starts doing it.
The second actually says that nomatter what you do,have passion with it(while doing it).
The differance is small but i thought you should better know the EXACT meaning of these two phrases in greek.
cheers and tattoos rule!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: oblivia on 15 Oct, 2007, 13:48:43
I saw earlier a translation for "I live, I love, I laugh"

It was Ζω Αγαπώ Γελώ.

I was wondering if it would be possible for anyone to show me this in different fonts and also capitalized or all lower case, just different variations really.

Thanks in advance for your help, this forum is alot of help!

As for capitals so it is: ΖΩ,ΑΓΑΠΩ,ΓΕΛΩ.
Now,for different varations,could you please be more specific? for example,give us sentences,the meaning you want for the words.you see,in greek words can be extremelly specific as for what you want to express.

its different to say i live,than i am alive or vivid. and its i love yoy but other thing when we say i am in love with you,other whten you want to say i am happy,another for i smile,an other for bliss etc etc.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jjoosshh on 15 Oct, 2007, 20:24:43
Well, I was actually more interested in the laugh portion of it.

"I Laugh" is there... so, what would laughter, the noun be?

A couple different fonts in lowercase would be awesome too.

Thanks again!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Euterpe on 16 Oct, 2007, 06:28:09
It would also be great if someone could confirm if it is modern/ancient Greek. I seem to remember that Αγαπώ is used in modern Greek in expressions such as "I love you", but it had a slight different meaning in ancient Greek. I might be wrong though. Thanks.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Oct, 2007, 07:18:35
It would also be great if someone could confirm if it is modern/ancient Greek. I seem to remember that Αγαπώ is used in modern Greek in expressions such as "I love you", but it had a slight different meaning in ancient Greek. I might be wrong though. Thanks.
Ζῶ, ἀγαπῶ, and γελῶ are all good ancient Greek, Euterpe, and mean the same things today — I live, I love, I laugh. 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jolu42 on 18 Oct, 2007, 01:23:42
I had a question regarding a translation from English to Ancient Greek. I wanted to get this Kid Icarus tattoo (Kid Icarus is an old-school NES game from the '80s) with the words "Kid Icarus" in Ancient Greek characters. There is probably not a proper translation for this, but any help would be greatly appreciated!! Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Oct, 2007, 02:14:01
the words "Kid Icarus" in Ancient Greek characters
ΙΚΑΡΙΣΚΟΣ  (Ἰκαρίσκος)
=  "Little Icarus."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: jolu42 on 18 Oct, 2007, 02:42:31
ΙΚΑΡΙΣΚΟΣ  (Ἰκαρίσκος)
=  "Little Icarus."

Thank you, my genius friend! You're awesome. I really appreciate the info.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Mengsk on 18 Oct, 2007, 16:01:34
how about "Where Is My Guardian Angel?" would anyone help me translate on it? both modern and ancient greek phrase, thx
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Oct, 2007, 16:43:34
how about "Where Is My Guardian Angel?" would anyone help me translate on it? both modern and ancient greek phrase, thx
Modern:  Πού είναι ο φύλακας άγγελός μου;

Ancient:  Ποῦ ἐστὶ τὸ δαιμόνιόν μου;

P.S.  Thanks, nickel! 
Title: 'a bond that can never be broken'
Post by: chocolate.chip.cookies on 18 Oct, 2007, 18:44:48
i would really like this in ancient greek as me (female) and my 2 brothers where thinking of having it inked.
ta
em
Title: Re: 'a bond that can never be broken'
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Oct, 2007, 19:07:25
i would really like this in ancient greek as me (female) and my 2 brothers where thinking of having it inked.
ΔΕΣΜΟΣ ΟΥΔΕΠΟΤΕ ΡΗΚΤΟΣ
(δεσμὸς οὐδέποτε ῥηκτός)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 18 Oct, 2007, 19:12:36
Wouldn't you also use

δεσμὸς ἄρρηκτος

as in the Iliad:

κόπτε δὲ δεσμοὺς ἀρρήκτους ἀλύτους
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 18 Oct, 2007, 20:45:45
Wouldn't you also use

δεσμὸς ἄρρηκτος
That's exactly what I wanted to use originally;  but it seemed necessary to work in the thought of "never."  So I changed it to δεσμὸς οὐδέποτε ῥηκτός.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: chocolate.chip.cookies on 19 Oct, 2007, 15:58:05
That's exactly what I wanted to use originally;  but it seemed necessary to work in the thought of "never."  So I changed it to δεσμὸς οὐδέποτε ῥηκτός.

so the 'δεσμὸς οὐδέποτε ῥηκτός' is the best translation as it stresses on the 'never'?
is there any chance anyone could put it into other types of fonts?

thank you all so very very much
em
x
Title: Tattoo translation
Post by: ecusmitty on 19 Oct, 2007, 16:44:09
I want to get a new tattoo with Greek writing but I am 100% sure of my transliteration since I am so new Greek. Could someone please help me if I have made a mistake!! Thank you and God Bless!

English: Love the Lord with all your mind hear and soul
Greek: Έρωτας ανά ο Παντοδύναμος όλος κι' όλος υμέτερος διάνοια, ψυχή (?????)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Oct, 2007, 16:49:45
so the 'δεσμὸς οὐδέποτε ῥηκτός' is the best translation as it stresses on the 'never'?
Nickel's suggestion has the advantage of being a direct quote from ancient Greek (Homer).  You might want to consider the "never" part to be superfluous, since something that's unbroken or unbreakable (ἄρρηκτος) is presumably always unbroken/unbreakable.

Or, if you still feel like stressing the lack of time limits, you can insert the word for "always," thus:  δεσμὸς ἄρρηκτος ἀεί.

Quote
is there any chance anyone could put it into other types of fonts?
Nickel may have time to help you with this.
Title: Re: Tattoo translation
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Oct, 2007, 17:43:01
The original Greek of Matthew 22:37 reads as follows:

Ἀγαπήσεις Κύριον τὸν Θεόν σου ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ καρδίᾳ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου.
Title: Re: Tattoo translation
Post by: antegeia on 19 Oct, 2007, 19:38:51
The original Greek of Matthew 22:37 reads as follows:

Ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεὸν σου ἐν ὃλῃ καρδίᾳ σου καὶ ἐν ὃλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ἐν ὃλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου.


Εεεεε συγγνώμην που επεμβαίνω (δεν κατάλαβα άλλωστε τί κάνετε εδώ πέρα), αλλά η φράση έχει μερικά λαθάκια, αν μου επιτρέπετε...

τό "Κύριον" καί τό "Θεόν" θέλουν όπως καί δήποτε κεφαλαία. τό "Θεόν σου" δε θέλει βαρεία αλλά οξεία. Πρίν το "καρδίᾳ" θέλει κι ένα "τῇ".  Τό "ὅλῃ" δε θέλει δασεία βαρεία αλλά δασεία οξεία....

Τές πα, όλο μαζί: Ἀγαπήσεις Κύριον τὸν Θεόν σου ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ καρδίᾳ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ὅλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Oct, 2007, 21:11:10
Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa.  Και τα μάτια γηράσκουν.
Τα 'χω διορθώσει.  Ευχαριστώ, antegeia!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kristin on 23 Oct, 2007, 04:05:17
with (or having) a love founded in faith

an example would be the word used in Titus 3:15.  Could this be used to describe a husband and wife?
 

And what would the greek translation be? phileo en piotei or something like that?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Oct, 2007, 06:47:04
with (or having) a love founded in faith
an example would be the word used in Titus 3:15.  Could this be used to describe a husband and wife?
And what would the greek translation be? phileo en piotei or something like that?
Paul's original Greek in Titus 3:15 reads τούς φιλοῦντας ἡμᾶς ἐν πίστει — "those who have affection for us in faith."  When it comes to describing the relationship between husbands and wives (Ephesians 5:21-33), Paul uses the word ἀγαπᾶν, "to love."  We'd be happy to give you the original Greek of anything that appeals to you in that chapter of Ephesians.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kristin on 23 Oct, 2007, 20:13:52
filostorgoz is the word that describes mutual love between husband and wife, or parents to children correct? 

what exactly does this mean? filew en piotei

my husband and i want to get tattoos that represent our love for one another through Christ.  Any suggestions in that regard?
thank you so much for your help!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 23 Oct, 2007, 20:55:14
filostorgoz is the word that describes mutual love between husband and wife, or parents to children correct? 
Φιλόστοργος means "tenderly affectionate," and is applied to family members, members of the community (as in Romans 12:10), etc.  I've never seen it applied specifically to a married couple. 

Quote
what exactly does this mean? filew en piotei
"I have affection (for someone) in (the) faith."

Quote
my husband and i want to get tattoos that represent our love for one another through Christ.  Any suggestions in that regard?
Paul leads into his discussion of marriage with the words ὐποτασσόμενοι ἀλλήλοις ἐν φόβῳ Χριστοῦ — "subjecting yourselves to each other in fear of Christ" (Ephesians 5:21).  So you might say ἀγαπῶντες ἀλλήλους ἐν φόβῳ Χριστοῦ ("loving each other in fear of Christ"), or, if you feel that's too strong, simply ἀγαπῶντες ἀλλήλους ἐν Χριστῷ ("loving each other in Christ").
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Kristin on 24 Oct, 2007, 00:05:04
ok thank you!
Title: Metis-Sovereign Female Wisdom, She destroys in Order To Recreate Balance
Post by: melanie on 24 Oct, 2007, 21:20:24
Metis - Sovereign Female Wisdom, She Destroys in Order to Recreate Balance.


I really am not sure how much of this can be translated into Ancient Greek. 


Thank you !

Melanie

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: cyberlife on 25 Oct, 2007, 00:28:23
hello! i wanted to get a tattoo that says "through His eyes" in anceint greek! can anyone help?
Title: Re: Metis-Sovereign Female Wisdom, She destroys in Order To Recreate Balance
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Oct, 2007, 05:16:39
Metis - Sovereign Female Wisdom, She Destroys in Order to Recreate Balance.
Let's give it an Aeschylean twist:

Μῆτις ἥ τε σοφία γυναικόβουλος παντελὴς καὶ διαφθορὰ πρὸς ἀποκατάστασιν ἰσορρεπῆ.

Literally:  "Metis, sovereign woman-devised wisdom and destruction for/toward balanced reconstitution."
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Oct, 2007, 08:00:49
hello! i wanted to get a tattoo that says "through His eyes" in anceint greek! can anyone help?
Ancient Greek would say "with (=by means of) His eyes":

ΤΟΙΣ  ΟΦΘΑΛΜΟΙΣ  ΑΥΤΟΥ
(τοῖς ὀφθαλμοῖς αὐτοῦ)
Title: Re: Metis-Sovereign Female Wisdom, She destroys in Order To Recreate Balance
Post by: melanie on 25 Oct, 2007, 14:35:28
Let's give it an Aeschylean twist:

Μῆτις ἥ τε σοφία γυναικόβουλος παντελὴς καὶ διαφθορὰ πρὸς ἀποκατάστασιν ἰσορρεπῆ.

Literally:  "Metis, sovereign woman-devised wisdom and destruction for/toward balanced reconstitution."

Billberg23....

Brilliant!  Thank you.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek//until last drop falls
Post by: scurek on 28 Oct, 2007, 02:16:28
hello,
I've been having this problem..
I love this quote: "Clear all your sins, not only your face."
and I'm almost sure that I've found it here...but now I just can't find it anywhere, so please...if anyone can translate this to me, I would be really thankful.

The other two things I would like to be translated (since I haven't found anything) are:
"And I don't dare deny the beast inside."
and
"Until Last Drop Falls."

Thanks ;)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek//until last drop falls
Post by: billberg23 on 28 Oct, 2007, 02:49:04
I love this quote: "Clear all your sins, not only your face."
It's a palindrome — that is, it reads the same backward and forward:

ΝΙΨΟΝ ΑΝΟΜΗΜΑΤΑ ΜΗ ΜΟΝΑΝ ΟΨΙΝ

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palindrome

It means, "Wash your sins, not only your face."

As for your other quotations, others may have heard them somewhere.  Or we might be able to fabricate them in ancient Greek, if that's what you'd like.  In any case, please make a new separate post for each (see RULES).
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: scurek on 28 Oct, 2007, 09:08:42
billberg23 thank you very much for such a quick reply.

I apology for breaking the rules. I forgot to write one or another and definitively not both (all three).
So I'm happy with the answer and no further translations are needed.

Thank you

Title: Live with Honor, Die with Honor translation
Post by: gonesurfin on 01 Nov, 2007, 19:22:53
Hi all ~

I've been planning to get a very large tattoo of a battle scene from the Illiad, but want to be sure that I'm using correct ancient greek for the text, which reads, "Live with Honor, Die with Honor."  I've come up with -- ζήστε με την τιμή, κύβος με την τιμή -- but I think that is modern greek.  I do not want to use the verb "to honor" since it has a different connotation.  Thank in advance for you help with this.

I also participate in a full contact sport combat group that represents a Homeric warband - but none of us speak greek, so I think this forum will be a valuable tool for us in the future.

Pelagon
a.k.a. Peter Van Rossum
Title: Re: Live with Honor, Die with Honor translation
Post by: billberg23 on 02 Nov, 2007, 06:33:11
"Live with Honor, Die with Honor."  I've come up with -- ζήστε με την τιμή, κύβος με την τιμή
Oops!  Kύβος means "die" as the singular of "dice"!  ((-:   For ancient Greek, try something like

Τιμῇ μὲν ζῆν, τιμῇ δ' ἀποθανεῖν 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: gonesurfin on 02 Nov, 2007, 07:29:34
Wow, that would have been a not-so-funny mistake for a tattoo!  Thanks so much for your help!

P
Title: brother's keeper
Post by: dead-at-birth on 06 Nov, 2007, 04:46:04
Hi.  I'm new here so sorry if I'm posting in the wrong section.  I need the following translated in ancient Greek and in lower case letters.  Thanks in advance.

brother's keeper

I am my brother's keeper
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Nov, 2007, 04:50:33
According to the Bible (Genesis, 4:9):

my brother's keeper = φύλαξ τοῦ ἀδελφοῦ μου / ΦΥΛΑΞ ΤΟΥ ΑΔΕΛΦΟΥ ΜΟΥ

I am my brother's keeper = φύλαξ τοῦ ἀδελφοῦ μού εἰμι / ΦΥΛΑΞ ΤΟΥ ΑΔΕΛΦΟΥ ΜΟΥ ΕΙΜΙ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: James23 on 06 Nov, 2007, 18:38:43
hey guys great forum u have here i need help translating the word "james" into ancient greek

help will be hugely appreciated!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 06 Nov, 2007, 19:09:26
i need help translating the word "james" into ancient greek
ΙΑΚΩΒΟΣ      (Ἰάκωβος)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Nov, 2007, 19:17:15
Modern Jameses (such as James Bond) are simply transliterated as Τζέιμς (ΤΖΕΪΜΣ). But biblical Jameses and kings are all Ιάκωβος, as Bill says.

There's an interesting story behind the name and its various changes (few Greeks realize that Santiago is actually Άγιος Ιάκωβος in Spanish), but what I found interesting in this Wikipedia entry (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_%28name%29), is that they think that the Greek for James is also Δημήτριος (Demetrios). There's some interesting background to it. Greeks called Demetrius, when they migrated to the States, would change their name to Jim, which, as a diminutive of James, of course has nothing to do with Demetrius.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: James23 on 06 Nov, 2007, 19:28:27
wow such fantastic replies billberg and nickel much appreciated.. i was after the biblical one so thankyou
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: katsa on 09 Nov, 2007, 04:51:10
I do not know if i am posting in the correct section
I would liek to get a tattoo with teh word KATSA is ancient freek fonts/letterings
I am struggling to find a site with these letter sin them
Can anyone please assist with variuos ancient greek fonts with teh word KATSA on here?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 09 Nov, 2007, 04:58:19
Do you mean something like this?

(https://www.translatum.gr/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimg265.imageshack.us%2Fimg265%2F2443%2Fkatsanh0.jpg&hash=7636fba172a752e4453227349a4f0ccbee370fa0)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: katsa on 09 Nov, 2007, 05:11:33
Many thnaks Nickel
Girst one is close to what I am looking for are there any other variations of this in other ancient greek fonts?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 09 Nov, 2007, 05:14:37
None that I would fancy, but have a look at the collection here: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=13486.msg101075#msg101075
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: katsa on 09 Nov, 2007, 06:21:53
http://www.strofesband.com/profile.html
applogies nickel heres teh link above
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: computerguy on 09 Nov, 2007, 20:31:25

Hey guys,  My family has a saying “Happy Happy” which came from “Happy Healthy”.   Is there any chance I can get somebody to translate that to Ancient Greek or Modern Greek?
Happy Happy “Healthy”

for me please!
-Rob


Title: Love, and, Live
Post by: AmberH on 12 Nov, 2007, 05:47:11
I actually already got the tattoo of "love" as ερως , and I didn't really do my research quite well and the ρ was tattooed on with the a curve at the bottom instead of it going straight down, don't know how I got that mistake, but ερως is a term for love right?  And I'm looking to tattoo the word live, as in "to live" or "live!"  I tried searching on here for a post that already had it, but I only was finding phrases with it.  I'm sorry if this more of a nuisance if it's been answered many times. I'm new :(
Title: Re: Love, and, Live
Post by: billberg23 on 12 Nov, 2007, 08:02:53
Ἔρως means "Love" all right, Amber, but it's the noun (and name of the ancient god), not the verb.  If you want the verb in ancient Greek, it's usually given as ἀγάπα ("love!").  And the ancient word for "live!" is ζῆ or ζῆθι.  But let us know if you prefer modern Greek.

And if you want the word for "life" (to match the noun you've already tattooed), it's ζωή, in both ancient and modern Greek.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: AmberH on 12 Nov, 2007, 18:36:43
well that's what i get for tattoing too quickly, but thank you very much for the info, it's much appreciated! :) :)
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: deadsonja on 12 Nov, 2007, 22:47:36
First off, what a fantastic forum!  I can't believe this exists, it's just too perfect... Anyway, I was contemplating getting a tattoo, 'Achilles' on one arm and 'Hector' on the other - would anyone be able to give me their names as written in Ancient Greek?

Thanks a lot!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 13 Nov, 2007, 08:09:53
Anyway, I was contemplating getting a tattoo, 'Achilles' on one arm and 'Hector' on the other - would anyone be able to give me their names as written in Ancient Greek?
ΑΧΙΛΛΕΥΣ   (Ἀχιλλεύς)
ΕΚΤΩΡ          (Ἕκτωρ)
Title: Bible Verses Translated Please, 1st Corrinthians 13:4-8, 1st Corrinthians 13:13, John 4:8
Post by: ashley5306 on 14 Nov, 2007, 01:37:32
If someone could please translate these bible verses for me.. i know one of the original bibles was greek.. and i am greek.. so i would like all these verses in greek tattood on my back.  could you translate verse by verse in NIV translation.. so it's easier to understand?  or would it be better to get the verses right out of the greek bible? 

Thanks!

1st Corrinthians 13:4-8

4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant 5or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; 6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. 7 Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. 8 Love never ends. As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away


1st Corrinthians 13:13

13 So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love.


1st John 4:8

8 Anyone who does not love does not know God, because(B) God is love


thank you

could you translate one more:

Matthew 22:37-38 NIV

Jesus said, "love the lord your god with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.  This is the first and greatest commandment"

THANKS AGAIN!

Title: Re: Bible Verses Translated Please, 1st Corrinthians 13:4-8, 1st Corrinthians 13:13, John 4:8
Post by: billberg23 on 14 Nov, 2007, 03:45:15
If someone could please translate these bible verses for me..
Please check the Rules (blue/yellow button at top of this page) before posting, Ashley:  one quotation per post, and nothing over 12 words long.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Karmh72 on 14 Nov, 2007, 04:54:08
Hello,
I am so stunned this place exists! I have been looking for a translation since I was 15 for one single word!
Its a Latin word and as such I can't seem to find a translation to Greek or ancient Greek. If you could help I would forever be in debt! the word is :

Incommendatus

my question is if there's a difference between modern and ancient greek versions, what's the right pronunciation of it, is there just a correct form of writning it or is there a normal one and a more aulic one with long or short accents? This is for a tattoo down my spine,, I just graduated from the university and I am at last ready for it

Thank you !
Heather
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 14 Nov, 2007, 05:24:03
Incommendatus

my question is if there's a difference between modern and ancient greek versions, what's the right pronunciation of it, is there just a correct form of writning it or is there a normal one and a more aulic one with long or short accents? This is for a tattoo down my spine
The word for "abandoned," "left behind" is basically the same in both ancient and modern Greek, though the forms are slightly different.  In ancient Greek, it's ἐγκαταλειφθείς.  Since you're female, you'd probably want the feminine form: ἐγκαταλειφθεῖσα.
In modern Greek, it's εγκαταλειμμένος (feminine εγκαταλειμμένη). 
Now I'll give you the pronunciation for the feminine forms, ancient first: eng-kah-tah-leef-thee-sa (stress on bold syllable, "th" as in "thing")
Modern:  eng-ka-tah-leem-meh-nee.
No "aulic" forms. Greek is too democratic for that stuff.  :-)))
There is, however, upper case:
ΕΓΚΑΤΑΛΕΙΦΘΕΙΣΑ, ΕΓΚΑΤΑΛΕΙΜΜΕΝΗ
Title: Re: Bible Verses Translated Please, 1st Corrinthians 13:4-8, 1st Corrinthians 13:13, John 4:8
Post by: user10 on 14 Nov, 2007, 09:57:44
If someone could please translate these bible verses for me.. i know one of the original bibles was greek.. and i am greek.. so i would like all these verses in greek tattood on my back.  could you translate verse by verse in NIV translation.. so it's easier to understand?  or would it be better to get the verses right out of the greek bible?

I don't quite get what you mean by "translate verse by verse in NIV". There is already a translation, or not?
Anyway, as for the original text in Greek (the New Testament was written in Greek), I am copy-pasting the text as is found in the official library site of the (orthodox) Church of Greece (http://www.myriobiblos.gr/). However, as Billberg pointed out, be careful not to ask for any translations of phrases longer than 12 words.



1st Corrinthians 13:4-8


4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant 5or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; 6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. 7 Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. 8 Love never ends. As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away

4 Ἡ ἀγάπη μακροθυμεῖ, χρηστεύεται, ἡ ἀγάπη οὐ ζηλοῖ, ἡ ἀγάπη οὐ περπερεύεται, οὐ φυσιοῦται, 5 οὐκ ἀσχημονεῖ, οὐ ζητεῖ τὰ ἑαυτῆς, οὐ παροξύνεται, οὐ λογίζεται τὸ κακόν, 6 οὐ χαίρει ἐπὶ τῇ ἀδικίᾳ, συγχαίρει δὲ τῇ ἀληθείᾳ· 7 πάντα στέγει, πάντα πιστεύει, πάντα ἐλπίζει, πάντα ὑπομένει.8 Ἡ ἀγάπη οὐδέποτε ἐκπίπτει. εἴτε δὲ προφητεῖαι, καταργηθήσονται· εἴτε γλῶσσαι, παύσονται· εἴτε γνῶσις, καταργηθήσεται

1st Corrinthians 13:13

So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love

νυνὶ δὲ μένει πίστις, ἐλπίς, ἀγάπη, τὰ τρία ταῦτα· μείζων δὲ τούτων ἡ ἀγάπη


1st John 4:8

Anyone who does not love does not know God, because(B) God is love

ὁ μὴ ἀγαπῶν οὐκ ἔγνω τὸν Θεόν, ὅτι ὁ Θεὸς ἀγάπη ἐστίν


Matthew 22:37-38 NIV

Jesus said, "love the lord your god with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.  This is the first and greatest commandment"


37 ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς ἔφη αὐτῷ· Ἀγαπήσεις Κύριον τὸν Θεόν σου ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ καρδίᾳ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου· 38 αὕτη ἐστὶ πρώτη καὶ μεγάλη ἐντολή

And my source: http://www.myriobiblos.gr/bible/default.asp

Try to get some confirmation before tattooing anything, though.

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Karmh72 on 14 Nov, 2007, 17:53:29
The word for "abandoned," "left behind" is basically the same in both ancient and modern Greek, though the forms are slightly different.  In ancient Greek, it's ἐγκαταλειφθείς.  Since you're female, you'd probably want the feminine form: ἐγκαταλειφθεῖσα.
In modern Greek, it's εγκαταλειμμένος (feminine εγκαταλειμμένη). 
Now I'll give you the pronunciation for the feminine forms, ancient first: eng-kah-tah-leef-thee-sa (stress on bold syllable, "th" as in "thing")
Modern:  eng-ka-tah-leem-meh-nee.
No "aulic" forms. Greek is too democratic for that stuff.  :-)))
There is, however, upper case:
ΕΓΚΑΤΑΛΕΙΦΘΕΙΣΑ, ΕΓΚΑΤΑΛΕΙΜΜΕΝΗ

Im not sure if it retains the same meaning I have always taken the latin phrase to be much more of a freeing,, lliberating warning   then an abandonment or left behind.
Its translation of "Incommendatus" in english is "without a lord, without a protector"  ,, I must have mistaken the phrase to be abandonment this whole time?!

I know little about the greek language but my grandmother requested if I "desecrate" my body to do it in her native language of which she will not assist me in :p. Is their a direct translation of letters I can use?

Thank you for your time,, this may all be for naught  but I have to at least try to respect Gigia's wishes!
Heather

Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 14 Nov, 2007, 18:22:30
Its translation of "Incommendatus" in english is "without a lord, without a protector"  ,, I must have mistaken the phrase to be abandonment this whole time?!
Sorry, Heather, I was giving you the classical Latin meaning.  In the Middle Ages, it did, apparently, come to mean "unprotected," "without a patron."  In ancient Greek, that would be ἀπρόξενος.  One of the ways to say it in modern Greek is  απροστάτευτη.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Karmh72 on 14 Nov, 2007, 20:29:41
Sorry, Heather, I was giving you the classical Latin meaning.  In the Middle Ages, it did, apparently, come to mean "unprotected," "without a patron."  In ancient Greek, that would be ἀπρόξενος.  One of the ways to say it in modern Greek is  απροστάτευτη.

Thank you so much!
Title: Re: Bible Verses Translated Please, 1st Corrinthians 13:4-8, 1st Corrinthians 13:13, John 4:8
Post by: ashley5306 on 15 Nov, 2007, 00:08:13
Please check the Rules (blue/yellow button at top of this page) before posting, Ashley:  one quotation per post, and nothing over 12 words long.  Thanks!

so then.. the problem is.. i don't know anyone greek.. and i really need something translated.. what am i suppose to do.. i don't want to go to the free translation site.. i have no idea if it's accurate!
Title: Re: Bible Verses Translated Please, 1st Corrinthians 13:4-8, 1st Corrinthians 13:13, John 4:8
Post by: ashley5306 on 15 Nov, 2007, 00:10:53
I don't quite get what you mean by "translate verse by verse in NIV". There is already a translation, or not?
Anyway, as for the original text in Greek (the New Testament was written in Greek), I am copy-pasting the text as is found in the official library site of the (orthodox) Church of Greece (http://www.myriobiblos.gr/). However, as Billberg pointed out, be careful not to ask for any translations of phrases longer than 12 words.



1st Corrinthians 13:4-8


4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant 5or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; 6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. 7 Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. 8 Love never ends. As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away

4 Ἡ ἀγάπη μακροθυμεῖ, χρηστεύεται, ἡ ἀγάπη οὐ ζηλοῖ, ἡ ἀγάπη οὐ περπερεύεται, οὐ φυσιοῦται, 5 οὐκ ἀσχημονεῖ, οὐ ζητεῖ τὰ ἑαυτῆς, οὐ παροξύνεται, οὐ λογίζεται τὸ κακόν, 6 οὐ χαίρει ἐπὶ τῇ ἀδικίᾳ, συγχαίρει δὲ τῇ ἀληθείᾳ· 7 πάντα στέγει, πάντα πιστεύει, πάντα ἐλπίζει, πάντα ὑπομένει.8 Ἡ ἀγάπη οὐδέποτε ἐκπίπτει. εἴτε δὲ προφητεῖαι, καταργηθήσονται· εἴτε γλῶσσαι, παύσονται· εἴτε γνῶσις, καταργηθήσεται

1st Corrinthians 13:13

So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love

νυνὶ δὲ μένει πίστις, ἐλπίς, ἀγάπη, τὰ τρία ταῦτα· μείζων δὲ τούτων ἡ ἀγάπη


1st John 4:8

Anyone who does not love does not know God, because(B) God is love

ὁ μὴ ἀγαπῶν οὐκ ἔγνω τὸν Θεόν, ὅτι ὁ Θεὸς ἀγάπη ἐστίν


Matthew 22:37-38 NIV

Jesus said, "love the lord your god with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.  This is the first and greatest commandment"


37 ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς ἔφη αὐτῷ· Ἀγαπήσεις Κύριον τὸν Θεόν σου ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ καρδίᾳ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου· 38 αὕτη ἐστὶ πρώτη καὶ μεγάλη ἐντολή

And my source: http://www.myriobiblos.gr/bible/default.asp

Try to get some confirmation before tattooing anything, though.



sorry for the long post.. i should have read that first.. thank you for translating!! i will check on it
Title: Re: Live with Honor, Die with Honor translation
Post by: antoncorleone on 15 Nov, 2007, 11:24:05
Oops!  Kύβος means "die" as the singular of "dice"!  ((-:   For ancient Greek, try something like

Τιμῇ μὲν ζῆν, τιμῇ δ' ἀποθανεῖν 


hello, could you give us that phrase in capitals?

i'd like to get that on my forearm. thanks :)
Title: Re: Live with Honor, Die with Honor translation
Post by: billberg23 on 15 Nov, 2007, 16:12:08
Τιμῇ μὲν ζῆν, τιμῇ δ' ἀποθανεῖν 
ΤΙΜΗΙ ΜΕΝ ΖΗΝ, ΤΙΜΗΙ Δ' ΑΠΟΘΑΝΕΙΝ
Title: "Live to Love"
Post by: ashley5306 on 16 Nov, 2007, 01:18:47
could you somehow translate LIve to Love... not sure if it would translate correctly.. or To Live is To Love.

Thank You
Title: Forgiven
Post by: ashley5306 on 16 Nov, 2007, 01:19:36
Could you translate "Forgiven"

Thanks
Title: Re: Forgiven
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Nov, 2007, 03:47:40
Could you translate "Forgiven"
Feminine:  συγγνωσθεῖσα
Title: Re: "Live to Love"
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Nov, 2007, 03:56:23
could you somehow translate LIve to Love... not sure if it would translate correctly.. or To Live is To Love.
Live to love = ζῆ ἴνα ἀγαπᾷς
To live is to love = τὸ ζῆν τὸ ἀγαπᾶν
Title: Paul Gunter
Post by: pavlos1981 on 16 Nov, 2007, 12:30:38
I am looking to get a tattoo and right now I would like to have my name in Greek as my mother is Greek Cypriot.

Paul Gunter

Can someone please translate this into Greek for me please. Any help is appreciated.

Thanks!

Paul

P.S. If my name has any other meanings I would appreciate hearing them.
Title: Re: Paul Gunter
Post by: billberg23 on 16 Nov, 2007, 16:08:28
I am looking to get a tattoo and right now I would like to have my name in Greek as my mother is Greek Cypriot.
Paul Gunter
Can someone please translate this into Greek for me please. Any help is appreciated.
P.S. If my name has any other meanings I would appreciate hearing them.
Paul, I assume you know your first name (Παύλος) in Greek.  For the last name, we'll need to know how you pronounce it — guhn-ter?  or goon-ter? — since that will make a difference in the modern Greek spelling.
"Paul" is related to the Latin word for "little."
"Gunter" is related to germanic gunther or günter meaning "warrior chief."  In Greek, this would exactly translate into πολέμαρχος (in case you wanted Παύλος Πολέμαρχος for your tattoo!).
Title: reconcile
Post by: schnicole on 17 Nov, 2007, 01:20:53
im interested in getting a piece of scripture tattooed in ancient greek symbols, since the new testament was written in that language.
the scripture is 2 cor 5:20
which ends with
"reconcile to/with God"  I have found it online, and i just want confirmation on what i have found.

cheers
Title: Re: reconcile
Post by: billberg23 on 17 Nov, 2007, 01:49:03
the scripture is 2 cor 5:20
My text, which has not proven 100% reliable in the past, reads as follows:

Ὑπὲρ Χριστοῦ οὖν πρεσβεύομεν, ὡς τοῦ Θεοῦ παρακαλοῦντος δι' ἡμῶν· δεόμεθα ὑπὲρ Χριστοῦ, καταλλάγητε τῷ Θεῷ.

But if it jibes with yours, then I guess we have confirmation.
Title: For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required: and to whom men have committed much, of him they will ask the more.
Post by: Kimberly007 on 18 Nov, 2007, 21:07:21
I am requesting help translating this part of Luke 12:48 into Ancient Greek, please.

"For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required: and to whom men have committed much, of him they will ask the more."

Thank you for any assistance you can provide!
Title: Re: For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required: and to whom men have committed much, of him they will ask the more.
Post by: billberg23 on 19 Nov, 2007, 03:43:59
I am requesting help translating this part of Luke 12:48 into Ancient Greek, please.
Your quotation is 'way beyond the 12-word limit, Kimberly (see Rules, blue/yellow button at top of this page).
Actually, you don't really mean "translating into ancient Greek," since the original text of the New Testament was actually written in ancient Greek, and later translated into English and other languages.  So you want the original Greek, which you can find in a number of bilingual downloads from the Internet.  Here is one of them:  http://apostolicbible.com/downbook.htm.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: akevil on 25 Nov, 2007, 03:45:42
Hey you guys! I would like to have the following quote translated into ancient greek:

"Time destroys everything"

Thank you so much and keep up the good work!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 25 Nov, 2007, 06:31:33
"Time destroys everything"
ὁ χρόνος πάντα διαφθείρει

Ο ΧΡΟΝΟΣ ΠΑΝΤΑ ΔΙΑΦΘΕΙΡΕΙ
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Greekone23 on 25 Nov, 2007, 20:16:32
Hello Everyone.
Could someone please translate the years 1963-1968-1975-1982-1985-1988-2001 into Greek numbers for me? These are significant years of major events in my life that I would like to have tattooed in a spiral around the upper portion of my arm.
Thanks for your help.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: Euterpe on 26 Nov, 2007, 03:29:41
Hello Everyone.
Could someone please translate the years 1963-1968-1975-1982-1985-1988-2001 into Greek numbers for me? These are significant years of major events in my life that I would like to have tattooed in a spiral around the upper portion of my arm.
Thanks for your help.

This is a though one. I know the theory. There are 2 systems.

1- the acrophonic system
The first letter of the number is used as a symbol for this number. Thus...
Ι = 1
Π = 5
Δ = 10
Η = 100
Χ = 1000
Μ = 10000

So I think you would have to add. For instance 1963 = ΧΗΗΗΗΗΗΗΗΗΔΔΔΔΔΔΙΙΙ
As you can see it is not very convenient...

2- the alphanumeric system
The Greek alphabet (plus a few Phoenician letters) is used to represent numbers. It is explained here: http://jesus8880.com/chapters/gematria/greek-alphabet.htm
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 26 Nov, 2007, 03:42:33
@Greekone23: I suppose you are interested in the so-called alphabetic numbers, presented somewhere else in these pages. Another useful source of information is Wikipedia's page: http://www.russellcottrell.com/greek/utilities/GreekNumberConverter.htm

1963 ͵αϡξγ
1968 ͵αϡξη
1975 ͵αϡοε
1982 ͵αϡπβ
1985 ͵αϡπε
1988 ͵αϡπη
2001 ͵βα


An even more useful address in this case is the Greek Numeral Converter: http://www.russellcottrell.com/greek/utilities/GreekNumberConverter.htm
Yes, you've guessed right, I didn't have to work it out in my head.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nomoremutants on 26 Nov, 2007, 19:31:45
Hey, I've been wanting to get a tattoo for a long time, but haven't been able to find the right translation.

What I'm looking for is a specific verse from a poem my the greek writer Sappho.

I have been able to find whole poems written the way they were in Ancient Greece, but its hard to tell exactly what I am looking at.

I just don't want something grammatically incorrect, or spelt wrong, or even translated wrong on my body for the rest of my life.

It would be really neat if I could do it this way, kindness in others, and such..

So here it is:

For even if she flees, soon she shall pursue.
            And if she refuses gifts, soon she shall give them.
            If she doesn’t love you, soon she shall love
            even if she’s unwilling.”
 
Annnd this might be a translation of it...

kai gar ei feugei tacew~ diwxei
ai de dwra mh deket, alla dwsei
ai de mh filei tacew~ filhsei
kwuk eqeloisa.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 27 Nov, 2007, 03:05:13
What I'm looking for is a specific verse from a poem my the greek writer Sappho.
So here it is:
center][/center] For even if she flees, soon she shall pursue.
            And if she refuses gifts, soon she shall give them.
            If she doesn’t love you, soon she shall love
            even if she’s unwilling.”
Annnd this might be a translation of it...
kai gar ei feugei tacew~ diwxei
ai de dwra mh deket, alla dwsei
ai de mh filei tacew~ filhsei
kwuk eqeloisa.
Yes, that's pretty much it in "greeklish," nomoremutants.  Here it is in Greek:

Καὶ γὰρ αἰ φεύγει, ταχέως διώξει,
αἰ δὲ δῶρα μὴ δέκετ', ἀλλὰ δώσει,
αἰ δὲ μὴ φίλει, ταχέως φιλήσει
κωὐκ ἐθέλοισα.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: nomoremutants on 27 Nov, 2007, 04:12:06
Thank you so much!
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: sweptide on 04 Dec, 2007, 02:21:45
Hello,  I am not familiar with the greek language and I am trying to translate something back to Greek that Aristotle talked about.  He lived in 322BC so I assume I'd need the ancient translation.  Here is what I am trying to translate...

Primum movens (Latin for First Cause or Mover Unmoved)

Would you know how to translate this to ancient Greek?  I would love to put this as a tattoo on my arm.

Thanks,
Jeff Williams
Title: Re: Κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit, true to his inner daemon
Post by: Alicambol on 06 Dec, 2007, 09:41:44
Hi all,

First time poster here - I'm getting a tattoo too!

My idea is I want 2 phrases flanked by the Temple of Apollo at Delphi. Been struggling to find a pic of the temple (as I'm sure it was razed a long long time ago), so will probably have to come up with something else.

I would like to have both phrases as the ancients would have written them (Say in a temple or on stone)

I think I have the first one sorted - know thyself:

ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ

The second one is the title of this thred. How would the ancients have written KATA TON DAIMONA EAYTOY in proper greek letters?. And would it be proper to have KATA TON on the first line and DAIMONA EAYTOY below it. How would the ancients have done this in 2 lines?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Many thanks.

Alex
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: banned8 on 06 Dec, 2007, 20:27:32
Hello,  I am not familiar with the greek language and I am trying to translate something back to Greek that Aristotle talked about.  He lived in 322BC so I assume I'd need the ancient translation.  Here is what I am trying to translate...

Primum movens (Latin for First Cause or Mover Unmoved)

Would you know how to translate this to ancient Greek?  I would love to put this as a tattoo on my arm.

Thanks,
Jeff Williams
Hi, Jeff.

It's:

τὸ πρῶτον κινοῦν

In upper case:

ΤΟ ΠΡΩΤΟΝ ΚΙΝΟΥΝ

You may see it here: http://remacle.org/bloodwolf/philosophes/Aristote/physique7gr.htm (II. § 1.)
Title: Re: Κατά τον δαίμονα εαυτού (Jim Morrison's gravestone) -> True to his own spirit, true to his inner daemon
Post by: billberg23 on 08 Dec, 2007, 09:56:07
My idea is I want 2 phrases flanked by the Temple of Apollo at Delphi. I would like to have both phrases as the ancients would have written them (Say in a temple or on stone)
I think I have the first one sorted - know thyself:
ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ
The second one is the title of this thred. How would the ancients have written KATA TON DAIMONA EAYTOY in proper greek letters?. And would it be proper to have KATA TON on the first line and DAIMONA EAYTOY below it. How would the ancients have done this in 2 lines?
Alex, if ΚΑΤΑ ΤΟΝ ΔΑΙΜΟΝΑ ΕΑΥΤΟΥ had been a familiar phrase in ancient times (which it probably wasn't), it could have been written in one, two, three, even four lines — whatever it took to fit it to the shape of the stone.  It could even have been broken in mid-word, and they wouldn't have minded much.
You're right about ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ being closely associated with Apollo at Delphi.  It was, in fact, one of the two gnomic utterances inscribed within the temple itself. The other was ΜΗΔΕΝ ΑΓΑΝ ("Nothing too much"), which (it seems to me) would be a much more appropriate mate to ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ than the modern inscription on Morrison's tomb.  Anyway, you might consider that for your tattoo.  If Jimbo himself had considered ΜΗΔΕΝ ΑΓΑΝ, we might have him, and his wonderful music, with us yet.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: thewarningbell on 08 Dec, 2007, 23:58:25
Howdy-

I was looking to get the last half of Isaiah 6:8 (here i am; send me) tattooed. I've found the verse in its entirety online, but I am unable to pick out just the last half. Is there anyone that can translate just that portion of the verse into ancient greek?
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 09 Dec, 2007, 01:33:01
I was looking to get the last half of Isaiah 6:8 (here i am; send me) tattooed.
Ἰδοὺ ἐγώ εἰμι· ἀπόστειλόν με.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: akaralar on 10 Dec, 2007, 05:34:51
Hello,

I'm a stranger to Greek and Ancient Greek, but nonetheless I want to have "The whole is more than the sum of its parts"(a quote by Aristotle in Metaphysics) tattooed. I tried to find how it is written and came up with some good approximations, ie I learned that it was in Book 8, 1045a, lines 8-10. However, when I check the English translations of that part of Book 8, it says:
"With regard to the difficulty which we have described in connection with definitions and numbers, what is the cause of the unification? In all things which have a plurality of parts, and which are not a total aggregate but a whole of some sort distinct from the parts, there is some cause ; inasmuch as even in bodies sometimes contact is the cause of their unity, and sometimes viscosity or some other such quality.But a definition is one account, not by connection, like the Iliad, but because it is a definition of one thing." at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0052&layout=&loc=8.1045a

Metaphysics in Ancient Greek can be found in Greek Wikisource, here is the link to Book 8: http://el.wikisource.org/wiki/%CE%9C%CE%B5%CF%84%CE%B1%CF%86%CF%85%CF%83%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%AC_-_%CE%92%CE%B9%CE%B2%CE%BB%CE%AF%CE%BF_%CE%97

Does anyone know if there is actually a quote like "The whole is more/greater than the sum of its parts", or is it just the summary of a part of the book? And, if that quote exists, can anyone tell how it was written originally?

Thanks for any kind replies.
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: billberg23 on 10 Dec, 2007, 08:39:34
Does anyone know if there is actually a quote like "The whole is more/greater than the sum of its parts", or is it just the summary of a part of the book? And, if that quote exists, can anyone tell how it was written originally?
The quotation "The whole is more/greater than the sum of its parts" is misleading when applied to Aristotle, akaralar.  Aristotle is talking about defining something as a whole rather than as a "heap" or "aggregate" (σωρὸς) of its parts.  The English might be misunderstood as claiming that the whole is somehow "bigger" than its parts, but in fact Aristotle meant simply that the whole cannot be defined only as the sum of its parts.  In Greek (Meta. 1045a, line 10) it's  ἔστι τι τὸ ὅλον παρὰ τὰ μόρια — literally, "The whole is something besides its parts."

If you're looking for something less obvious and more transcendent, try Hesiod, Works and Days 40:  "The half is more than the whole" — πλέον ἥμισυ παντός, which has to do with equity in the archaic Greek legal system.

 
Title: Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
Post by: akaralar on 10 Dec, 2007, 16:15:20
The quotation "The whole is more/greater than the sum of its parts" is misleading when applied to Aristotle, akaralar.  Aristotle is talking about defining something as a whole rather than as a "heap" or "aggregate" (σωρὸς) of its parts.  The English might be misunderstood as claiming that the whole is somehow "bigger" than its parts, but in fact Aristotle meant simply that the whole cannot be defined only as the sum of its parts.  In Greek (Meta. 1045a, line 10) it's  ἔστι τι τὸ ὅλον παρὰ τὰ μόρια — literally, &q