invictus et fortis maneo; deus sum victurus natus

Bartosz

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 6
    • Gender:Male
I know invictus maneo is correct, I wanted to add (and bold). That's why I put et fortis. I was also thinking of puting some correct version of Audentis instead of fortis.... (ausim maybe...?) Is et fortis correct? Ausim?

As for Deus..... I know Deus et dominus natus is correct and I wanted to add "winner, destined to win".... Will et victurus be ok?

 
« Last Edit: 23 Apr, 2018, 10:42:08 by billberg23 »


billberg23

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6318
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.
That's a real mouthful in any language, and the semicolon just makes it less coherent.  Decent Latin would be more like deus victurus natus invictus audensque maneo, "born to be a god who will conquer, I remain unconquered and bold."  Still a mouthful, but more correct.



Bartosz

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 6
    • Gender:Male
Thanks billberg23!

But now I see my subject was missleading...

It were supposed to be two separate sentences:

Invictus et fortis maneo
and
Deus et victurus natus

I hope it makes it less a ,mouthful now :) I will really aprreciate your comment and  suggestion on that

Should be like this (following your translation) ? :

invictus et audensque maneo  -   I remain unconquered and bold (or without "et"?)

deus et victurus natus  - born to be a god who will conquer  (or without "et"?) But the oryginal has the "et" Deus et dominus natus (what about victoris?)

Deus et victurus natus - my meaning is more Born god and a winner, or Born god and the one who will win
« Last Edit: 09 Apr, 2018, 18:55:01 by spiros »


billberg23

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6318
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.
Two different sentences = two different people?  If not, then it should all be in one sentence.
Quote
invictus et audensque maneo  -   I remain unconquered and bold (or without "et"?)
No et. Latin -que means "and."
Quote
deus et victurus natus  - born to be a god who will conquer  (or without "et"?) But the oryginal has the "et" Deus et dominus natus.

Dominus is a noun.  Victurus is an adjective (participle).  No et.
Quote
Deus et victurus natus - my meaning is more Born god and a winner, or Born god and the one who will win.
Then you mean Deus et victor natus.
« Last Edit: 09 Apr, 2018, 19:24:31 by billberg23 »



Bartosz

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 6
    • Gender:Male
WOW, that's impressive, thanks

If I can be audensque again and ask following:

1. Quote
Two different sentences = two different people?  If not, then it should all be in one sentence.

Yes two separate sentences without any connection


2. Quote
No et. Latin -que means "and."

Now I am really confused because I thought "et" means "and"

for example:

A Deo et patre - From God and my father
A Deo et rege - From God and the king
Animo et fide - By courage and faith

Can you explain?

3. So the final correct version is Invictus audensque maneo?

Without "et"

How will I know it means "Undefeated and Bold I remain" since there is no que or et?


4. Would Audax or Fortis be correct to replace audensque in this sentence?

5. Quote
Dominus is a noun.  Victurus is an adjective (participle).  No et.    ok,
Quote
Deus et victurus natus - my meaning is more Born god and a winner, or Born god and the one who will win.
Then you mean Deus et victor natus.  OK :) but what does "et" mean here?

But what would DEUS VICTURUS NATUS mean then... Born god who is destined to win?


billberg23

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6318
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.
Quote
Now I am really confused because I thought "et" means "and."
It does.  But when two parallel structures (as here, two participles, invictus and audens) are coupled, they are appropriately joined by the suffix -que, which also means "and."  You could equally well have written invictus et audax.  Up to you.
Quote
So the final correct version is Invictus audensque maneo? How will I know it means "Undefeated and Bold I remain" since there is no que or et?
But there is -que: audensque, "and bold."
Quote
Deus et victor natus.  OK :) but what does "et" mean here?
Of course it means "and."  You could equally well have said Deus victorque natus.
Quote
But what would DEUS VICTURUS NATUS mean then... Born god who is destined to win?
Exactly.


Bartosz

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 6
    • Gender:Male
Thanks, I've been thinking for some time about starting to learn Latin, inspired by the quotes and mottoes - you inspire me more!

But hopefully for you I wan't - you would be asked too many questions :)

1. Quote
  You could equally well have written invictus et audax.  Up to you.

Ok. So "audens" and "audax" are exchangeable? They both mean "I am bold"?. Using one or another depends only if you want to use "que" or "et"?  Invictus audensque maneo or Invictus et audax maneo?

2. What do you think of the following: "Quia nominor deus victorus" or "quia nominor deus et victor"? Both correct? Hopefully , after your teachings I must have learned sth... Some sources add "ego" in the oryginal sentence: "Quia ego nominor leo" Is the ego ("me" I guess) ok there and would be in my suggested sentences as well?


billberg23

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6318
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.
Invictus audensque maneo or Invictus et audax maneo?
Both sound good.

I don't know where you're getting "Quia nominor deus victorus" or "quia nominor deus et victor" ("Because my name is god and winner"?), but I'd leave it alone.  In the first place, "victorus" is not a Latin word.


Bartosz

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 6
    • Gender:Male
I don't know where you're getting "Quia nominor deus victorus" or "quia nominor deus et victor" ("Because my name is god and winner"?), but I'd leave it alone.  In the first place, "victorus" is not a Latin word.

It was a typo. I meant victurus.

Both sentences are my variation of "Quia nominor leo" or sometimes presented as Quia ego nominor leo.

Tom Tyler, 'Quia Ego Nominor Leo: Barthes, Stereotypes and Aesop’s Animals'

Anyway, could you be kind and comment the following in terms of its grammar and meaning?

"Quia nominor Deus"
"Quia ego nominor Deus"
"Quia ego nominor Deus et victor"?




billberg23

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6318
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.
The grammar is fine.  The citation and its meaning ("Because my name is god / god and winner") is getting away from the topic of this thread.
Anyway, I think you have enough input from me now. Let's wait for someone else to comment, if they wish.  My farewell suggestion to you is that you read what the bible says about the abomination of tattooing in Leviticus 19:28.


Bartosz

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 6
    • Gender:Male
:) I've told you would have enough of me soon  !!! :) :)

Thanks very for your kind help. :)  It means a lot.

And I will consult the book.

Wish you all the best.



 

Search Tools