Tattoos and Ancient Greek

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boldturkey

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Hi, I was hoping to have a translation of my own, but (of course) wanted it to be as accurate as possible.  It's a quotation attributed to Socrates in the "Exile" portion of Plutarch's "Morals":

"...that he was not Athenian nor Greek but a citizen of the world..."

And the translation I've found is: οὐκ Ἀθηναῖος οὐδὲ Ἕλλην, ἀλλὰ "Κόσμιος" εἶναι φήσας

What I was hoping to confirm was: if the translation I've stated above is inaccurate in any way; if the statement were to be more accurate in all capital letters as opposed to including lower case; and if it's appropriate to include the punctuation that's included, such as the commas or quotation marks.

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!



billberg23

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"...that he was not Athenian nor Greek but a citizen of the world..."
We can confirm that Plutarch's very words, at De exilio 599a-607f, were

ὁ δὲ Σωκράτης βέλτιον, οὐκ Ἀθηναῖος οὐδ' Ἕλλην ἀλλὰ κόσμιος εἶναι φήσας, ὡς ἄν τις Ῥόδιος εἶπεν ἢ Κορίνθιος ...

There are no marks of punctuation (except for the apostrophe) in the transmitted text you have targeted.  In upper case, (which Plutarch probably used), the apostrophe would not have appeared.  So:

ΟΥΚ ΑΘΗΝΑΙΟΣ ΟΥΔΕ ΕΛΛΗΝ ΑΛΛΑ ΚΟΣΜΙΟΣ ΕΙΝΑΙ ΦΗΣΑΣ




boldturkey

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We can confirm that Plutarch's very words, at De exilio 599a-607f, were

ὁ δὲ Σωκράτης βέλτιον, οὐκ Ἀθηναῖος οὐδ' Ἕλλην ἀλλὰ κόσμιος εἶναι φήσας, ὡς ἄν τις Ῥόδιος εἶπεν ἢ Κορίνθιος ...

There are no marks of punctuation (except for the apostrophe) in the transmitted text you have targeted.  In upper case, (which Plutarch probably used), the apostrophe would not have appeared.  So:

ΟΥΚ ΑΘΗΝΑΙΟΣ ΟΥΔΕ ΕΛΛΗΝ ΑΛΛΑ ΚΟΣΜΙΟΣ ΕΙΝΑΙ ΦΗΣΑΣ



Great!  Thanks for the concise response!  With this phrase in upper case, are the accents no longer required?





ser84

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Hi all,

I have another inquiry to make of you... how do you write the number 13 in ancient greek?  I don't want the normal "13", so I'm looking for different ways of writing it to find the most interesting one.

Thanks


billberg23

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how do you write the number 13 in ancient greek?
The simple number is abbreviated ιγ', or written out as τρεισκαίδεκα or  ΤΡΕΙΣΚΑΙΔΕΚΑ.  If items are being enumerated, and if those items are of neuter gender in Greek, use τρία καὶ δέκα  or  ΤΡΙΑ ΚΑΙ ΔΕΚΑ (if writing out the numeral).
« Last Edit: 28 Jun, 2010, 08:44:51 by billberg23 »


vbd.

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I don't want the normal "13", so I'm looking for different ways of writing it to find the most interesting one.

Also:  ΔΙΙΙ  in acrophonic attic numerals.
At last, I have peace.



simplicity

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Hi,
I'm getting a tattoo done but i'm a little unsure as which quote to go for so i was hoping you could maybe translate them in to ancient greek first. It would be much appreciated:

"We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are"

"The more i live, the more i learn, the more i learn, the more i realise, the less i know"

Thank you for your help


billberg23

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"The more i live, the more i learn, the more i learn, the more i realise, the less i know"
Simplicity, do read "The Rules" before posting (click at top of page), esp. Rule 1.4:  one request per post, please.

Here's one suggestion for your second quotation, often (but falsely) attributed to Socrates: https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=918.15


kyleroden

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Hi guys.

I'm looking for an Ancient Greek translation of the Latin phrase: "fac sapias et liber eris"

Which I understand to mean: "make yourself wise and you will be free" or "be wise and you will be free"

any help is greatly appreciated


billberg23

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I'm looking for an Ancient Greek translation of the Latin phrase: "fac sapias et liber eris"
Which I understand to mean: "make yourself wise and you will be free" or "be wise and you will be free"
Thucydides might have put it as simply as this:
τὸ σῶφρον τὸ ἐλεύθερον

— literally, "Wise behavior is freedom."  Compare https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=10337.0


Seikilos

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Hello,

I'm planning to incorporate a line from the Song of Seikilos into a tattoo. I intend to use the original Greek, exactly as inscribed on the pillar:



Here's a clearer view of the relevant part of the inscription:



Here's a transliteration of the words, courtesy of Wikipedia:

    Hoson zēs, phainou
    Mēden holōs sy lypou;
    Pros oligon esti to zēn
    To telos ho chronos apaitei

And an English translation:

    While you live, shine
    Don't suffer anything at all;
    Life exists only a short while
    And time demands its toll.

I need to know where the line breaks would occur in the original inscription if the words were arranged in four lines, as in the transliteration and the translation. Thank you!


billberg23

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I'm planning to incorporate a line from the Song of Seikilos into a tattoo.
I need to know where the line breaks would occur in the original inscription if the words were arranged in four lines
ΟΣΟΝ ΖΗΣ ΦΑΙΝΟΥ
ΜΗΔΕΝ ΟΛΩΣ ΣΥ ΛΥΠΟΥ
ΠΡΟΣ ΟΛΙΓΟΝ ΕΣΤΙ ΤΟ ΖΗΝ
ΤΟ ΤΕΛΟΣ Ο ΧΡΟΝΟΣ ΑΠΑΙΤΕΙ

Interesting tattoo project!  Which line will you choose?


 

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