Translation - Μετάφραση

Translation Assistance => Other language pairs => Ancient Greek->English translation forum => Topic started by: mightymo5 on 12 May, 2006, 20:48:36

Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: mightymo5 on 12 May, 2006, 20:48:36
Πάντα έργασία νικᾷ -> Labor Omnia Vincit (Work conquers all)

Greetings translators! 

I have been trying to determine the meaning of the phrase "Πάντα έργασία νίκα"  which is found on a sorority shield.  I have been taught that it means Omnia Vincit Labore (all is conquered through labor), but the words and letters don't seem consistent with that translation.  Recently, I was told that it could be translated as Panta Ergosa Nika, or Always Strive for Victory.

Any help you can offer would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Monique
Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: banned8 on 12 May, 2006, 20:52:42
Omnia Vincit Labore (all is conquered through labor) is absolutely correct as a translation.
Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: mightymo5 on 12 May, 2006, 21:01:46
Thank you so much Nickel!!!  But is it possible that "always strive[ing] towards victory"  is plausible as well? 
Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: banned8 on 12 May, 2006, 21:07:42
But is it possible that "always strive[ing] towards victory" is plausible as well? 

No, not at all. Actually, the Greek is exhortatory. Conquer all through labor. Νίκα is the imperative form. And εργασία is the dative form (hence "through labor"). Πάντα is an accusative plural form.
Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: wings on 12 May, 2006, 21:11:08
The meaning of the Greek word "εργασία" is "labour, work".

I suppose "strive" does not suggest the exact meaning compared to "all is conquered through labour" that Nickel suggested.

"Πάντα" means "everything" not always here and "νίκα" is an imperative.

In other words, you can also say "conquer everything through hard work".

P.S.
Sorry, Nick. I didn't see your last post. Connection problems again.
Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: mightymo5 on 12 May, 2006, 21:22:27
Thank you for clarifying this translation gentlemen!  The more I learn, the more I realize how little I actually know :-)
Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: wings on 12 May, 2006, 21:23:48
Cheers, Monique and you are always welcome.:-)))
Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: billberg23 on 12 May, 2006, 22:09:06
Actually, Monique,  "Omnia vincit labore" doesn't mean "all is conquered by labor;"  instead, it means "she conquers all by labor." The Greek would then be πάντα εργασία νικά, with εργασία as dative of instrument and νικά as third person singular. 
However, the Latin "translation" bothers me, because it sounds dangerously close to 'labor omnia vicit" ("labor conquered all"), a popular phrase from Virgil (Georgics 1.145).  If this is what the Greek is trying to say, then εργασία is the subject.  So you've given us a real locus difficilis.
Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: spiros on 12 May, 2006, 22:24:04
The German version: Arbeit macht frei
Title: πάντα ἐργασία νικᾷ -> work conquers all
Post by: banned8 on 12 May, 2006, 22:39:59
I haven't paid much attention to the Latin and I don't know whether 'vincit' can be used with the meaning of "one wins / conquers". I suppose what you have and need explained is the Greek motto. What I would like to know is whether it is in upper case. How do you know that it is "νίκα" and not "νικά" (though the version you have given makes more sense to me).