regardless of the obstacle anything can be overcome → οὐδὲν τοῖς θαρροῦσιν ἀνάλωτον

desius · 6 · 4008

desius

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Over, under, around, or through. There is always a way. (= Regardless of the obstacle anything can be overcome.) → Oὐδὲν τοῖς θαρροῦσιν ἀνάλωτον

This phrase holds a lot of meaning to me.   The context being akin to "Regardless of the obstacle anything can be overcome."
« Last Edit: 31 May, 2022, 17:48:42 by spiros »


billberg23

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"Regardless of the obstacle anything can be overcome."
The sentiment is virtually identical to that of Alexander's motto:  see There is nothing impossible to him who will try → οὐδὲν τοῖς θαρροῦσιν ἀνάλωτον (Plutarch, Life of Alexander 58.2.3).  What do you think?  The English "Over, under, around ... way" won't fit, at least not literally, into ancient Greek terminology.
« Last Edit: 31 May, 2022, 17:48:08 by spiros »



desius

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Thank you billberg, that does indeed match the sentiment I was looking for.

I read from the post regarding fonts, that Ancient Greek is usually written in all capital letters; this is primarily for style?


billberg23

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Ancient Greek is usually written in all capital letters.
"Was," not "is."  These days, most people prefer lower case, which has been in general use since the Middle Ages.  Here is the quotation in upper case, should you decide to use it:
ΟΥΔΕΝ ΤΟΙΣ ΘΑΡΡΟΥΣΙΝ ΑΝΑΛΩΤΟΝ



desius

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Thank you very much for the help and insight billberg!

I have one last unenlightened question if you don't mind.

οὐδὲν τοῖς θαρροῦσιν ἀνάλωτον
ΟΥΔΕΝ ΤΟΙΣ ΘΑΡΡΟΥΣΙΝ ΑΝΑΛΩΤΟΝ

I noticed that on the second word, the lowercase sigma is ς , yet on the third word it is σ .

Σ σ ς

I want to assume it is just a word-final variation but I want to be sure. 
Also, could I bother you for the literal, word-for-word translation (with context/meaning if it varies) ?
...ok I guess technically that was two questions.  :)
« Last Edit: 14 Sep, 2010, 00:12:59 by desius »


billberg23

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Σ σ ς:
I want to assume it is just a word-final variation
Your assumption is absolutely correct!
Quote
 
Also, could I bother you for the literal, word-for-word translation?
"[Nothing] [for those who venture/try/dare] (is) [ungraspable]"


 

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