wanax → ἅναξ

Aelfryth

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I have come across the word, in latin script, 'Wanax', meaning King. Can anyone tell me how this word would be written in Ancient Greek and how it should be pronounced. What is the difference between a Wanax and a Basilias ?
« Last Edit: 26 Mar, 2014, 23:30:46 by spiros »


NadiaF

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The word is actually "Anax" and it is the ancient Greek equivalent of the word King (mod. Greek: Vassilias)
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wings

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Hello, there.

The word in ancient Greek is ἅναξ (pronunciation: anax).

Βασιλεὐς is a "king" while ἅναξ has a more general meaning, including a "ruler", an "archon" or a "king".



« Last Edit: 24 Nov, 2006, 13:16:50 by wings »
Ο λόγος είναι μεγάλη ανάγκη της ψυχής. (Γιώργος Ιωάννου)


Dr Moshe

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Dear Aelfryth,

Wanax or Fάναξ is actually a reconstructed linguistic form, which corresponds to Mycenaen Greek wa-na-ka. The initial w/F: digamma is also confirmed by analysis of dialectic inscriptions.
As to the semantic field of the word, it originally covered a limited range of qualities attributed to gods, such as "protector" or "saviour". For instance, the homeric formula ἄναξ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε (king of men and gods) applies only to Zeus. Later, the word was scarcely and sporadically used in the sense of "shire, master", until it was almost entirely substituted for the common synonym βασιλεύς "king".

Ι hope you find this information useful.
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wings

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This was very important information for all of us. Thank you so much, Dr Moshe! :-)
Ο λόγος είναι μεγάλη ανάγκη της ψυχής. (Γιώργος Ιωάννου)


Aelfryth

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Thank you Dr. Moshe, Wings and NadiaF for your valued information and for the amazing speed with which you responded.

Aelfryth


billberg23

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We might perhaps add that the Mycenaean (2nd millennium B.C.) wanax was actually a human "lord," though he may have been paid divine honors.  His underlings (something like dukes), each had the title basileus.  The later (Homeric) Greek organization of the Olympian gods was probably based on the organization of the Mycenaean court, just as later Greek temple architecture was based on the megaron of the Mycenaean wanax.  Meanwhile, in the more egalitarian society of that later time, only the basileus survived, not as an absolute ruler, but as primus inter pares — first among equals.
« Last Edit: 07 Jun, 2022, 11:34:40 by spiros »


spiros

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Anax (Greek: ἄναξ; from earlier ϝάναξ, wánax) is an ancient Greek word for "tribal chief, lord, (military) leader". It is one of the two Greek titles traditionally translated as "king", the other being basileus, and is inherited from Mycenaean Greece. It is notably used in Homeric Greek, e.g. for Agamemnon. The feminine form is anassa, "queen" (ἄνασσα, from wánassa, itself from *wánakt-ja).
Anax - Wikipedia
ἄναξ - Ancient Greek (LSJ)
« Last Edit: 07 Jun, 2022, 11:32:24 by spiros »


 

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