Author Topic: βῆ δ' ἀκέων παρὰ θῖνα πολυφλοίσβοιο θαλάσσης  (Read 4074 times)

rinscewind

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Sorry, no Greek font.

This is a quote from a Lord Dunsey tale, from the early 1900s. The story is short, so I shall paste it here, for context:


THE WORM AND THE ANGEL


As he crawled from the tombs of the fallen a worm met with an angel.

And together they looked upon the kings and kingdoms, and youths
and maidens and the cities of men. They saw the old men heavy in
their chairs and heard the children singing in the fields. They saw far
wars and warriors and walled towns, wisdom and wickedness, and
the pomp of kings, and the people of all the lands that the sunlight knew.

And the worm spake to the angel saying: "Behold my food."

"Be dakeon para Thina poluphloisboio Thalassaes," murmured the
angel, for they walked by the sea, "and can you destroy that too?"

And the worm paled in his anger to a greyness ill to behold, for for
three thousand years he had tried to destroy that line and still its
melody was ringing in _his head_.

(Story copy/pasted from Gutenberg Press, see their copywrite details if questions.)

Can someone translate the Angel's reply?  Thanks!
« Last Edit: 18 Oct, 2006, 14:35:37 by wings »
'Never judge a man until you have walked a mile in his shoes. Then go ahead -- you will be a mile away, and will also have his shoes.'


banned8

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It's from the beginning of Homer's Iliad (1:34): Without a word, he went by the shore of the noisy sea (or 'sounding sea').

In Greek:

βῆ δ' ἀκέων παρὰ θῖνα πολυφλοίσβοιο θαλάσσης
« Last Edit: 18 Oct, 2006, 13:56:24 by nickel »

rinscewind

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Sorry took so long to reply, but thanks!

:)

'Never judge a man until you have walked a mile in his shoes. Then go ahead -- you will be a mile away, and will also have his shoes.'