Translation of swearing in English movies with Greek subtitles

Leon · 9 · 26145

Leon

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Let's say that a translator was translating an English film into Greek (Greek subtitles at the bottom of the screen while the film is rolling), how would he/she approach the task if there was swearing involved? Would he/she just ignore the swearing and not include it in the translation, or simply translate the swearing?

Thanks a lot,
Leon.
« Last Edit: 10 Aug, 2005, 19:17:37 by spiros »
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
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banned13

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Hi, Leon.

I would say, it depends.
In the films shown in movie-theaters, the translators usually tend to translate all the swearing.
But the Greek TV channels don't allow much swearing, especially in series and films intended for younger viewers. So, you would see less or milder swearing in the subtitles.



spiros

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Yes, I think you tend to get milder swearing, i.e. the f word tends to be translated as "πήδημα".


Leon

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Thank you both!
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
- Ρήγας Φερραίος



Leon

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Also, although this is not about swearing, why are so many titles of English and American films translated into something completely different in Greek? I can't think of an example right now but I see this a lot in Cyprus, and mostly when there is a perfectly good Greek translation that fits correctly. Why?

Leon.
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
- Ρήγας Φερραίος


Kennedy

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Leon, that phenomenom is not relegated to Greek alone, it happens in many other languages, too. Honestly, I'd say Brazilian Portuguese is the king (queen?) of that. I very rarely find a movie title which is an exact translation from the original version. That is why many people that I know (I'm originally Brazilian) actually prefer, when speaking of a movie, to use its original title, rather than go by its translation.

If you were to ask me why, I'd say that literal translations scarcely ever bear the same semantical weight than its original counterpart. For that reason, it is not only preferred, but needed, to exert a little cultural influence on the title, have it sound more native-like (towards the language in which it's being translated into, of course).

And let us not forget that English has done the same with many Chinese, Japanese movies etc. :-)

Bear in mind that I am not defending this approach, though. I'm just offering you an explanation. :)
Verberat nos et lacerat fortvna: patiamvr. Non est sævitia, certamen est, qvod qvo sæpivs adierimvs, fortiores erimvs. Seneca


Leon

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Thanks again.

If someone is writing formally about a film or a book title let's say, I think the best solution is to write the title in the original language, and then the translation in parentheses which will not be used in later reference to the title. I.e. "Όσο για την ταινία «The Lord of the Rings» («Ο Άρχοντας των Δακτυλιδιών»), δε μου άρεσε και πολύ. Το πολυσυζητημένο έργο «My Big, Fat, Greek Wedding» («Γάμος α λα Ελληνικά») θα προβαληθεί απόψε, και δεν μπορώ να περιμένω μέχρι να το δω."
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
- Ρήγας Φερραίος


Kennedy

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If someone is writing formally about a film or a book title let's say, I think the best solution is to write the title in the original language, and then the translation in parentheses which will not be used in later reference to the title.

If the movie has been translated officially, it's the other way around. You cite its title in the language into which it has been translated, followed by its original title. In fact, that doesn't go only to movies, but to basically anything. If that work has not been translated yet, though, then you provide its title in the original version, followed by a version in your language, always mentioning that it is a free translation (i.e., made by you, not official).
Verberat nos et lacerat fortvna: patiamvr. Non est sævitia, certamen est, qvod qvo sæpivs adierimvs, fortiores erimvs. Seneca


altiusdirectory

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