πινακωτή, τσιότρες, αχυρουφάγια, ντουκάνα

aleka · 26 · 12482

Offline wings

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 67772
    • Gender:Female
  • Vicky Papaprodromou
    • vicky.papaprodromou
    • @hellenic_wings
    • hellenicwings
    • Βίκυ Παπαπροδρόμου: ό,τι πολύ αγάπησα (ποίηση, πεζογραφία & μουσική)

Offline banned13

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 2972
    • Gender:Female
Δείτε κι αυτό:

Ακόμα είχαν τον αχυροφά (ή γιαμπά) που γυρνούσαν το χόρτο για να στεγνώσει και από την άλλη μεριά, να το αποθηκεύσουν για να έχουν τροφή για τα ζώα. Ο αχυροφάς ήταν όπως το σημερινό δοκράνι αλλά πιο φαρδύ και ξύλινο.
http://alex.eled.duth.gr/Rodopi/tradition/aigeiros/texts/14.htm

Και μια και τα υπόλοιπα είναι εργαλεία ή σκεύη... Αν είναι αυτό, καλά λέει η Αλέκα "κάτι που φτυαρίζουν τα άχυρα".
Οπότε πρέπει να το πούμε hay-fork;
« Last Edit: 23 Oct, 2005, 13:27:59 by alexandra_k »



Offline aleka

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
    • Posts: 725
    • Gender:Female
  • no rest for the wicked...
Δεν έχω την παραμικρή ιδέα πως να το πω... προς το παρόν το αφήσα sickle και έχει ο θεός.

Να'στε καλά πάντως για τη βοήθεια και συγγνώμη για την εξαφάνιση... είχα ΟΤΕ-προβλήματα όλο το Σ/Κ

Καλή μας βδομάδα!

Αλέκα
« Last Edit: 24 Oct, 2005, 23:28:29 by aleka »
Destruction leads to a very rough road, but it also breeds creation.


Offline mala

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 228
    • Gender:Female
Αρκετά παλιό το νήμα που ξέθαψα, αλλά προσπαθώ να μεταφράσω την πινακωτή! Στο νήμα αυτό έχει μεταφραστεί ως baker's peel, αλλά αυτό είναι το φουρνόφτυαρο και όχι η πινακωτή. Η πινακωτή είναι ένα μακρύ και φαρδύ ξύλο, χωρισμένο σε τετράγωνες θήκες, όπου έβαζαν τα πλασμένα ψωμιά για να φουσκώσουν μέχρι να τα βάλουν στο φούρνο. Καμιά ιδέα;
Long is the way, and hard, that out of hell leads up to light...



Offline wings

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 67772
    • Gender:Female
  • Vicky Papaprodromou
    • vicky.papaprodromou
    • @hellenic_wings
    • hellenicwings
    • Βίκυ Παπαπροδρόμου: ό,τι πολύ αγάπησα (ποίηση, πεζογραφία & μουσική)
Αρκετά παλιό το νήμα που ξέθαψα, αλλά προσπαθώ να μεταφράσω την πινακωτή! Στο νήμα αυτό έχει μεταφραστεί ως baker's peel, αλλά αυτό είναι το φουρνόφτυαρο και όχι η πινακωτή. Η πινακωτή είναι ένα μακρύ και φαρδύ ξύλο, χωρισμένο σε τετράγωνες θήκες, όπου έβαζαν τα πλασμένα ψωμιά για να φουσκώσουν μέχρι να τα βάλουν στο φούρνο. Καμιά ιδέα;

Μαλ., για δες αν σου κάνει το kneading trough που δίνει το Magenta.


Offline mala

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 228
    • Gender:Female
Βίκυ, σ' ευχαριστώ για την άμεση ανταπόκριση, αλλά kneading trough είναι το σκαφίδι, το ξύλο όπου ζυμώνουν τα ψωμιά.
Long is the way, and hard, that out of hell leads up to light...


Offline wings

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 67772
    • Gender:Female
  • Vicky Papaprodromou
    • vicky.papaprodromou
    • @hellenic_wings
    • hellenicwings
    • Βίκυ Παπαπροδρόμου: ό,τι πολύ αγάπησα (ποίηση, πεζογραφία & μουσική)
Συγγνώμη, Μαλ., δεν βρίσκω τίποτα καλύτερο. Μα κανένα μουσείο μας δεν έχει μεταφράσει τη λέξη; Πόσο βιαστικό είναι;


Offline banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 132
    • Gender:Male
Πω πω, αυτό εδώ είναι από τις μέρες που δεν μαστιγώναμε όποιον έβαζε δύο ή παραπάνω όρους σ' ένα νήμα.

Εκτός από το baker's peel, έχω αναφέρει και το baking board. Κανονικά είναι το δεύτερο. Μπορεί να είναι η τάβλα που πηγαίνανε τα ψωμιά στο φούρναρη ή «σκάφη» του φούρναρη, με χωρίσματα και στις δύο περιπτώσεις. Επειδή τα χωρίσματα δεν φαίνονται στο αγγλικό, αν πρέπει να το προσθέσεις, πες partitioned baking board.


Να προσθέσω και δυο πινακωτές (ακουμπισμένες εδώ στον τοίχο):

« Last Edit: 06 May, 2007, 20:49:34 by nickel »


Offline elena petelos

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 3185
    • Gender:Female
  • Qui ne dit mot consent.
Προς Νίκο, Το "φτυάρι", "ξυλόφτυαρο" ή "πάσα" δεν είναι πινακωτή...

Mια και έβαλες φωτογραφία...
Peel. The peel has been defined as "a sort of shovel, with a long handle, used to set the bread in the oven, and also to take it out." [29] Ordinarily peels were made from a single piece of wood, but those used for handling tins and pans generally had iron blades, as often did those employed in making biscuits. And, as shall be seen below, the wooden blades of some peels were separate pieces which were fastened to the poles by various means. Occasionally peels were made entirely of wrought iron. [30] The blades, whether of wood or iron, were flat and as thin as practicable.

Edlin's 1805 Treatise contains a lucid discussion of the types of peels in ordinary use in England at that time:

There are usually four peeles [sic] kept in a bakehouse, viz, the quartern peele, to set the quartern loaves; the half quartern peele, for the half quartern loaves; the drawing peele, for drawing out the bread; and the peels for placing and removing tins [for rolls, pies, and puddings]. The quartern peele is a pole about eight feet long, with a wooden blade, about a foot wide and sixteen inches long, fixed at the end with strong screws. The half quartern peele is of the same kind, about half the length, and much smaller. The drawing peele is a strong pole, ten feet long, with a blade, thicker, broader, and longer than the others; and the peele for setting in the tins has a strong blade of iron, instead of wood, which is fixed with screws into the handle. [31]

Peels specified for the U. S. Army in 1864 were described as: "Size of blade — 10 in. wide, 24 in. long; pole, long, 16 feet, short, 10 feet long." [32] This terse description does not make clear whether the blade was one piece with the blade or a separate piece, but since the army peel was largely for handling pans, the blade probably was of iron. The specifications for 1882 are not much clearer: "blade 20 inches x 10 inches attached to a ten foot pole, for removing bread from the oven." [33]

The peel used in France at the end of the eighteenth century was made from a single piece of wood, as is clearly shown by "fig. 10" in Figure 16. This type of peel was brought to Canada by the earliest French settlers and was widely used, even by the English in Canada, during the early nineteenth century.

A present-day specimen of the Canadian peel, used for demonstration purposes at Fort York, Toronto, was carved from a single piece of soft pine. It was measured by the present writer in May, 1973, and found to have the following dimensions:

Width of blade 8-1/8"
Length of blade 16"
Overall length of blade and handle 66-1/2"
Thickness of blade at tip 1/4"
Thickness of blade at base of handle (pole) 3/4"
Cross section of handle (oval in shape) 7/8" x 1-5/8"

For a photograph of a companion peel to the one described above, see Plate IX. When not in use, peels were commonly stored in overhead racks. See Figures 6 and 11.





http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/fova1/hfr4.htm


« Last Edit: 06 May, 2007, 21:06:15 by elena petelos »


Offline mala

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 228
    • Gender:Female
Σ' ευχαριστώ, Νίκο. Η αλήθεια είναι ότι στην αρχή το είχα βάλει baking board, αλλά δεν μου φάνηκε πολύ ακριβής όρος. Θα χρησιμοποιήσω το partitioned baking board.
Long is the way, and hard, that out of hell leads up to light...


Offline banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 132
    • Gender:Male
Κοιτάζω και τα bread moulds (αλλά περισσότερο το μπάσκετ).


 

Search Tools