Author Topic: εύμηλος -> rich in sheep; fit for sheep  (Read 1753 times)

nikas

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εύμηλος -> rich in sheep; fit for sheep
« on: 27 Oct, 2007, 15:52:26 »
First of all, Hi to everybody.

 I am new to this forum so I don’t know much how things work around here.
I speak ancient Greek myself, just can’t find out the real meaning of the word:

Εύμηλον.
Eu-(better/best)
μηλον(apple/sweet)

If anyone can associate this word with the word better/best that would be great.
I really need proof and references.
Thank you.
« Last Edit: 27 Oct, 2007, 18:23:24 by nickel »


banned8

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Re: εύμηλον
« Reply #1 on: 27 Oct, 2007, 15:57:13 »
In ancient Greek, μήλον is also sheep or goat and, if this is, for example, from the Odyssey, it would mean "rich in sheep" or "fit for sheep".
« Last Edit: 27 Oct, 2007, 16:18:23 by wings »

antegeia

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Re: εύμηλον
« Reply #2 on: 27 Oct, 2007, 17:55:04 »
Αδυνατώ να το γράψω στα αγγλικά αλλά μιας και δεν αναφέρεται ολοκληρωμένη πρόταση και το Εύμηλον είναι γραμμένο με κεφαλαίο Ε, δεν υπάρχει περίπτωση να είναι όνομα στην Αιτιατική;

Ο Εύμηλος αναφέρεται στην Ιλιάδα από τον Όμηρο, ως βασιλιάς (νομίζω των αρχαίων κατοίκων της Μαγνησίας).
« Last Edit: 27 Oct, 2007, 18:14:31 by nickel »
Πιό γρήγορα κι ἀπ' τή σκιά μου...


banned8

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Re: εύμηλον
« Reply #3 on: 27 Oct, 2007, 18:22:31 »
True. What antegeia is saying here, Nikas, is that, since your word is capitalized, you may be referring to Eumelus, who turns up in various stories, including the Iliad.
I hope the origin of this name remains the same.

Also note that in both cases εύμηλον is the accusative of εύμηλος.
« Last Edit: 27 Oct, 2007, 18:25:28 by nickel »


nikas

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Re: εύμηλος -> rich in sheep; fit for sheep
« Reply #5 on: 28 Oct, 2007, 18:21:02 »
Quote
Αδυνατώ να το γράψω στα αγγλικά αλλά μιας και δεν αναφέρεται ολοκληρωμένη πρόταση και το Εύμηλον είναι γραμμένο με κεφαλαίο Ε, δεν υπάρχει περίπτωση να είναι όνομα στην Αιτιατική;

Oh no I am sorry, isn’t a capital E, just my MS-word capitalizes the first letter of the first word in a sentence automatically.
Anyway, the word is taken from the writings of Plato, Kritias and Timaeus. εύμηλον is a translation done in 600 B.C by the Greek poet Solon from the word Gadeiron.

And yes, many associate the word εύμηλον with εύμηλος.

So, Εύμηλον is the name of a place. To be more precise what I am looking here for is to see a connection between the word Melita and Εύμηλον. I always thought that Melita is a Greek word (Place of bee’s/Honey….e.t.c) but if you check the Latin Dictionary it means BEST or BETTER or RICH.

If you can find anything about it I will appreciate it. Thank you.


banned8

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Re: εύμηλος -> rich in sheep; fit for sheep
« Reply #6 on: 29 Oct, 2007, 02:08:50 »
Sorry, Nikas, but if you are trying to make sense of the names that Plato gave to people and places in his tales of Atlantis, I for one cannot help, as I belong to the club of people who believe that Atlantis is nothing but a myth that Plato concocted from various other tales in order to to illustrate his political theories. On that basis, I cannot try to make educated guesses as to the origins of names such as Eumelus. In Critias, as you know, Gadeirus is the name given to Atlas's twin brother and, according to the text, his name in Greek was Eumelus, but who knows whether the latter is a translation. On the other hand, if the region of Gades has anything to do with Cadiz, the Greek name for it (i.e. other than Γάδειρα) has disappeared in the bottom of the sea, along with the legendary Atlantis.