Give me a place to stand and I'll move the earth -> Δός μοι πᾷ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινήσω (Archimedes, quoted in Pappus' Συναγωγή 8.1060)

brainwa · 19 · 26486

brainwa

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Give me a place to stand and I'll move the earth (Archimedes, quoted in Pappus' Συναγωγή 8.1060) -> Δός μοι πᾷ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινήσω

Could someone show me a period correct translation of this quote attributed to Archemedes?  Much appreciation
« Last Edit: 28 Aug, 2013, 07:44:56 by billberg23 »


wings

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Δός μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω.
« Last Edit: 14 Jan, 2008, 16:16:32 by wings »



Alys210

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Can anyone help me with translating this quote?

Give me a place to stand and I will move the world

Thanks!




babison

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could you tell me which part means 'and I will move the world'?

Thanks
« Last Edit: 05 Dec, 2009, 04:03:46 by billberg23 »


wings

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babison

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would καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω be ok on its own? or should it be 'I shall move the earth'?


vbd.

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τὰν γᾶν κινάσω would be "I will move the earth", but this quote by Archimedes isn't written in the most common ancient Greek dialect, Attic. It's written in the Doric dialect instead. In Attic it would be: καί τήν γῆν κινήσω.

I'm saying that because you've been taking bits and pieces from various sayings, but mixing up sentences written in different dialects would result in an awkward outcome.

or should it be 'I shall move the earth'?

At the end of the day, all these words mean something, but how you're going to arrange them depends entirely on what you're trying to say, and without knowing that there's not much help we can offer.
« Last Edit: 01 Feb, 2012, 05:34:32 by billberg23 »
At last, I have peace.


babison

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I'm saying that because you've been taking bits and pieces from various sayings, but mixing up sentences written in different dialects would result in an awkward outcome.

nono in this particular case its just this one (the tennyson was for a different idea which I'm juggling between) for this one I want Archimedes' quote but again, only the second part.

τὰν γᾶν κινάσω would be "I will move the earth", but this quote by Archimedes isn't written in the most common ancient Greek dialect, Attic. It's written in the Doric dialect instead. In Attic it would be: καί τήν γῆν κινήσω.

so which would Archimedes' be? and which one is more appropriate on its own? (i realise they are just different dialects)

hope you understand what I mean, really don't mean to be difficult, just don't want to make any mistakes
Thanks
« Last Edit: 01 Feb, 2012, 05:36:22 by billberg23 »


vbd.

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As in the beginning of this topic:
Δῶς μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω.
That's the real thing.
« Last Edit: 01 Feb, 2012, 05:37:29 by billberg23 »
At last, I have peace.


clag

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hi,

I'm new to learning Greek and I'm having a difficulty understanding the difference between: Δῶς μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω and δῶς μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω

I understand the first phrase was written in Doris, and the second is written in Attic.

Also, I understand that this famous quote is referring to Archimedes' lever. Do either of these phrases mention the lever, or is it clearly "Give me a place to stand and I will move the earth"

Any response is much appreciated. Thanks!!!


billberg23

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I'm new to learning Greek and I'm having a difficulty understanding the difference between: Δῶς μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω and δῶς μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω
Actually, unless my eyes deceive me, you've written the same sentence twice, both times in Archimedes' Syracusan Doric.  If you really want to see it in Attic Greek, it would be δός μοι ποῦ στῶ καὶ τὴν γῆν κινήσω.
Quote
Also, I understand that this famous quote is referring to Archimedes' lever. Do either of these phrases mention the lever, or is it clearly "Give me a place to stand and I will move the earth"
Your translation is accurate.  The lever is only implied, not mentioned.


Greeeyez143

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Hi there, I'm looking for the Greek translation for this archimedes quote. I would like those exact words, it is for a tattoo. Looking for either the modern Greek translation or the ancient attic Greek. Thank you in advance
« Last Edit: 07 Feb, 2012, 00:24:51 by spiros »


crystal

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For the ancient Greek see

Give me a place to stand and I'll move the earth -> Δῶς μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=13727.0

Δῶς μοι πᾶ στῶ καὶ τὰν γᾶν κινάσω -> Give me a place to stand on, and I will move the Earth (Archimedes)
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=69908.0


Greeeyez143

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I'm looking for the words, "show me where to stand and I shall move the earth" as opposed to the translation of the quote you just gave me. If you can. Thanks


 

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