I am dead. Notice.

pythianhabenero

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I remember reading an inscription of some kind which read, in two words, "I am dead. Notice." The first word was "thanatos"; what was the second likely to have been?
« Last Edit: 09 Dec, 2005, 13:58:41 by wings »


banned8

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I don't see the connection. I can only think of "Danger of Death" signs, which are "ΚΙΝΔΥΝΟΣ ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ" (i.e. Danger - Death).
« Last Edit: 09 Dec, 2005, 14:17:04 by wings »



wings

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Υes, this must be what nickel said. "Notice" most probably means "Attention" here.
« Last Edit: 09 Dec, 2005, 14:14:39 by wings »


pythianhabenero

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It was two words - first word "ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ", second word something which apparently means "Notice" as in "take note". I believe it was on some sort of old gravestone, or at least intended to be the words of a dead person.
« Last Edit: 09 Dec, 2005, 13:18:46 by pythianhabenero »



wings

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Τhe most possible phrase I can think of is: ΕΝΘΑΔΕ ΚΕΙΤΑΙ, which means "this is where XXX was buried".

Eνθάδε =  here
Κείται = lies

Βut we always use this phrase with the 3rd person of the Greek verb for "lie".

« Last Edit: 09 Dec, 2005, 14:06:17 by wings »


banned8

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If the first word is "ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ", i.e. Death, the second one could not have been "take note".

Now, the first word could have been "ΘΑΝΑΤΕ", the so-called vocative case, as in "Death, take note".

But people write what they like on their grave stones, so I find it impossible to guess what it was as there is no fixed phrase that your information reminds me of.
« Last Edit: 09 Dec, 2005, 13:56:59 by wings »


pythianhabenero

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If the first word is "ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ", i.e. Death, the second one could not have been "take note".

Now, the first word could have been "ΘΑΝΑΤΕ", the so-called vocative case, as in "Death, take note".

But people write what they like on their grave stones, so I find it impossible to guess what it was as there is no fixed phrase that your information reminds me of.
There may not be a fixed phrase, but there surely must be a way to say "I am dead. Notice," or it would not have been said. At least, then, what's the likeliest way to say "Notice." in that context?


wings

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What nickel was trying to explain is that there is no likely way to say something that does not make any sense.

Is it common in English to say "I am dead. Notice."? What's the meaning? "Look at me, I am dead" or "Beware. I am dead." ?

But, as Nickel says, people can have anything they want written on their grave stones so we just can't guess.
« Last Edit: 09 Dec, 2005, 14:13:27 by wings »


Philip

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As this is such an unusual juxtaposition in English, and as "notice" could be either verb or noun, there is no way of commenting on the greater likelihood of one as opposed to the other.  We can only know likelihood either (a) by consulting existing data about phrases in the language, or (b) by having a context which is close enough to eliminate possible alternative meanings.  Otherwise we are left with unresolvable ambiguity, which is what poets regularly exploit (and when the big problem for translators is to render as many of the multiple meanings as possible).
But how shall men meditate in that, which they cannot understand? How shall they understand that which is kept close in an unknown tongue?

THE TRANSLATORS TO THE READER
Preface to the King James Version 1611


 

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