X factor -> παράγοντας Χ, έχει το κατιτί, αυτό το κάτι, είναι πράγματι ξεχωριστός, είναι πραγματικά ξεχωριστή

Leon · 14 · 6221

Leon

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Hi.

For a little while now I've been wondering what the Greek translation of 'x factor' could be (watching the British TV show, X Factor, sparked this off).

An example sentence with this phrase could be: "She's definately got that x factor".

Can anybody help.

Thank you very much.

Leon.
« Last Edit: 29 Oct, 2017, 09:04:16 by spiros »
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banned8

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I think it is used instead of the French "je ne sais quoi", that mysterious quality (an indefinable quality that makes somebody or something more attractive or interesting).



Leon

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Yes, that's about the best way to describe it.

Is there a Greek equivalent?
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spiros

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NT

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An idea:

Maby the accurate translation is 'είναι πράγματι ξεχωριστή' (she is really special) ή 'έχει όντως ταλέντο' (she is really talented).
Perhaps then, the 'X' is not refering to the mathematic meaning of 'x' (as something unknown) but to words such as 'xtraordinary, xceptional and xciting' (all that an ambitious talent should be according to shows)

And a little strange use of the phrase 'x-factor': a have a friend from England who is biologist. I had heard him once saying about a very feminine woman the same phrase, so I asked him about its meaning. He told me that it's just a phrase among similar scientists for describing 'feminine' women! (women possess two copies of the X chromosome, which in biology is called the X Factor, instead of men having the chromosome Y and X. So, he was trying to say 'she is a real woman', 'she has that distinct characteristict'). Peculiar use, isn't it?

NT


Leon

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Very weird! But I'm pretty sure the 'x' in 'x factor' does mean 'unknown' ('unknown factor').

But if we had to translate the actual show X Factor, what would it's Greek form be?

Thanks again.

Leon.
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banned8

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You're right, Leon. The "x" in "x-factor" does mean "unknown" and is not used for women only. And the X-chromosome is not called X-factor.

As for the show, I'm not familiar with it. They would probably translate it as "Ο παράγοντας Χ" (ΟΚ, συμφωνεί κι ο Σπύρος) or paraphrase it as "Ο άγνωστος Χ".


NT

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Ok,

obviously you know better.

I translated it as 'ξεχωριστός' (special) it in connection with all these series of books, movies etc., entitled X... something, like X-man for examble:  x-man refers to special people with abilities beyond human sense, meaning, extraordinary and notable.
The same applies to all X-Factor series written by Peter David.

The show 'X-Factor' it is a reality talent show -I must confess that I realy hate them- which took this particular title according to people who is directed to: 'xtraordinary, xceptional and xciting' as I said to my previous message.

[For biology, well... I just mentioned an 'expression' I have heard, I don't advocate for its validity. I was never good at biology anyway   : )       ]

NT


banned8

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I don't necessarily know better. Often I just search better. If you look at various uses of "X-factor" in Leon's context, it will become obvious that it's pretty much what back in the 60s was just "the knack". I do agree that in other contexts they may extend the meaning of X in the direction of 'xtraordinary.


Leon

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The British TV show X Factor is a reality talent show judging peoples' singing abilities (very, very similar to the Greek Super Idol). I actually expected it to be translated as Ο Παράγοντας X (after all, the show's title and the phrase 'x factor' in a different kind of passage would most likely be translated differently). But would the title Ο Παράγοντας X make sense to a Greek viewer?

On the search that Spyros made, it seems that 'παράγοντας X' seems to be accepted as a translation of the phrase 'x factor' in English, but I would've otherwise chosen 'ξεχωριστό ταλέντο' (or something similar depending on the context). The phrase 'έχει το "κάτι τι"' that Spyros wrote has taken my attention. Could you please elaborate on this.

Thanks for a good discussion :-).

Leon.
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NT

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I suppose that you can use the phrase "έχει το 'κάτι τι'" in a friendly conversation between two Greek-speaking people, when U want to say that someone is special, but the 'X-Factor' is not its English corresponding phrase anyway.

As for the "Πσράγοντας Χ", it makes no sense to me as a title for a talent show.

NT

P.S. isn't the word 'kanck' meaning 'special prowess' = the special ability that has someone to do something = so, you agree with me nickel !!!!!!!!!!!



banned8

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Note that my disagreement was not as to your understanding of the meaning of X-factor. I didn't agree with the interpretation of its origin and its connection to chromosomes. Note that this special, mysterious, undefinable, je-ne-sais-quoi quality (not 'prowess') is also implicit in 'knack' (Encarta: a particular skill, especially one that might be innate or intuitive and therefore difficult to teach).


Leon

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Thanks for all help!

So, which is 'x factor', finally? NT sas that 'παράγοντας X' makes no sense, 'έχει το "κάτι τι"' is informal... so what?

Leon.
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