know thyself -> γνῶθι σαυτόν, γνώθι σαυτόν, ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ

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major

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Know thyself (Chilon the Spartan) -> Γνῶθι σαυτόν, Γνώθι σαυτόν, ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ

Hi, I'm new and involved in development of a specialist philosophical website. We would like to include the loaded and we think quite profound "know thyself". We have found the Greek translation - that is, Gnothi se Auton, but cannot locate the ancient greek phrase anywehere. Could anyone help?
« Last Edit: 24 Dec, 2018, 13:57:43 by spiros »


banned8

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That's because it's actually:

γνῶθι σαυτόν
See: Know thyself - Wikipedia

The Ancient Greek aphorism "know thyself" (Greek: γνῶθι σεαυτόν, transliterated: gnōthi seauton; also ... σαυτόν … sauton with the ε contracted), is one of the Delphic maxims and was inscribed in the pronaos (forecourt) of the Temple of Apollo at Delphi according to the Greek writer Pausanias (10.24.1).[The phrase was later expounded upon by the philosopher Socrates who taught that:

The unexamined life is not worth living
« Last Edit: 28 Dec, 2018, 02:08:04 by billberg23 »




sherm

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sherm

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Cheers, much appreciated!

One last question before I leave you in peace, how is it pronounced?  I've read that the second word (seauton/sauton) is pronounced sow-tan but am unaware of the first word (gnothi).

Regards,
 sherm


billberg23

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agm689

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I would love if you could translate the phrase "Know thyself." into the ancient greek of socrates. Thanks!


vmelas

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I would love if you could translate the phrase "Know thyself." into the ancient greek of socrates. Thanks!

Please refer to this thread where this question has been answered. Thanks!


goggles007

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I have been doing a lot of research regarding this translation. I want to get this as a tattoo and want to be 100% sure of the correct way it is spelt. I understand there are many different ways of writing things in greek depending on the time of the language, etc.

However, I have narrowed it down to either being:

γνῶθι σεαυτόν or σαυτόν

I was just wondering what is the difference between the longer and contracted versions?

Also, how important is the punctuation above the letters?

Thanks very much!


billberg23

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γνῶθι σεαυτόν or σαυτόν
The first is the uncontracted version — the way it might have been spelled out on an archaic inscription, for example.  The second is the more familiar, contracted form — the most common, traditional way to write it.  As for the diacritical marks (accents), they are important if you want to write ancient Greek minuscule the way it's been written since the Middle Ages.  But you can avoid all accents if you choose to use capital letters:  ΓΝΩΘΙ ΣΑΥΤΟΝ.



Leon

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It has been a long time since I wrote on translatum, but here I am for totally different reasons!

I shall be getting inked at Christmas, if all goes to plan. One of the tattoos I would love to get is γνῶθι σαυτόν just above my right wrist. This aphorism is very symbolic to me as a person and represents me and my philosophy so accurately. Furthermore, being of Greek Cypriot descent, I feel nothing less than fervent pride to have something I find so powerful and rooted deeply in Hellenism adorning my body!

Regrettably, I know very little about Ancient Greek. My first question is: which is the correct way the aphorism should be accented? I have seen (on this very thread and elsewhere on the Internet) both γνῶθι σαυτόν and γνῶθι σατόν - which is correct?

I would absolutely love to have this tattoo in the font seen in this photograph. Does anybody know the name of this font or style? Or could it have just been designed or decided upon by the tattoo artist/customer? Any solitary information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks to everybody in advance (and hello to all those who remember me).
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
- Ρήγας Φερραίος


billberg23

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My first question is: which is the correct way the aphorism should be accented? I have seen (on this very thread and elsewhere on the Internet) both γνῶθι σαυτόν and γνῶθι σατόν - which is correct?
Leon, good to hear from you again!
In no authoritative text of Plato or Stobaeus can I find σαυτόν written with a breathing mark over the upsilon.  You're safe in omitting it.  Σεαυτόν is considered as one word, so σαυτόν is simply a contraction of it, not a combination of the two words σέ and αὐτόν.

As for the "font" of the tattoo you show, I'd say it's a nice piece of calligraphy by a gifted tattooist.  So you might look for one who knows and loves Greek longhand.


Leon

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Thanks for the reply. Nice to hear from you too, billberg.

Well, the tattoo should be done in Cyprus (by a Cypriot tattoist), so I'm hoping he may be able to help out with the lovely, mellifluous calligraphy, or at least enlighten me somehow and point me in the right direction.
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
- Ρήγας Φερραίος


 

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