In the reflection of my screen I got to know myself -> Βλέπων γὰρ δι' ἐσόπτρου ἐπέγνων ἐμαυτόν

Odin · 10 · 3041

Odin

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Could someone please give me an ancient Greek translation of the following frase:

"In the reflection of my (computer)screen I got to know myself"

I appreciate your attention!

I realize the phrase sounds like a very arrogant and nerdy version of γνώθι σεαυτόν  but is isn't meant so  =)


« Last Edit: 16 Apr, 2008, 05:48:17 by billberg23 »


billberg23

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It would be presumptuous and anachronistic of me, Odin, to try to write "computer" in ancient Greek.  Instead, I will adapt the words of 1 Corinthians 13:12:

Βλέπων γὰρ δι' ἐσόπτρου ἐπέγνων ἐμαυτὸν.

Literally:  For, looking into a metal mirror, I got to know myself.




Odin

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By the way if I make it:

τῷ εἰδώλῳ ἐσόπτρου μοῦ ἐπέγνων ἐμαυτόν

Would that also be correct?
« Last Edit: 16 Apr, 2008, 05:46:54 by billberg23 »



billberg23

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Tῷ εἰδώλῳ ἐσόπτρου μοῦ would be most naturally taken to mean "for the ghost of the mirror of me."  Ancient Greek, by the way, wouldn't need to use a possessive with "mirror."
Maybe you could let us know more about the idea you're trying to nail down, Odin.  The ancients may (or may not) have had a way of expressing it.


jag

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Hi Billberg23 and everyone else who reads this,

The request for the translation is actually mine. At the moment I am writing my thesis and usually people use famous quotations as an introduction or to express their feelings about the thesis.

I'm of the opinion that writing a thesis, although necessary to receive my degree, is a complete waist of time. Therefore I find it difficult to motivate myself, which results into starring at my computer and books for most of the day, while writing nothing.

Some people use quotes in Latin or Greek often just because it looks more interesting. "Proof" for this can be found in phrases like: Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum videtur and
Graeca sunt, non leguntur.

Partly because it is true and partly as a joke I would like to use the phrase:

"Starring at my (computer)screen, I got to know myself"

or

"In the reflection of my (computer)screen I got to know myself"

Now, I understand that it is anachronistic but it has to be in ancient Greek. First because my Professor (and future employer) should not be able to understand the sentence at a first glance and second as a jest to all those who use Greek phrases for all the wrong reasons, namely just to make things look interesting.

Of course any suggestions of phrases which are more in line with the ancients are more than welcome.

I hope you or anyone else would be so kind to help me.

Kind regards,

JAG
« Last Edit: 29 Feb, 2008, 02:27:46 by jag »


jag

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At the moment I am writing my thesis and usually people use famous quotations as an introduction or to express their feelings about the thesis.

I'm of the opinion that writing a thesis, although necessary to receive my degree, is a complete waste of time. Therefore I find it difficult to motivate myself, which results into starring at my computer and books for most of the day, while writing nothing.

Some people use quotes in Latin or Greek often just because it looks more interesting. "Proof" for this can be found in phrases like: Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum videtur.

Partly because it is true and partly as a joke I would like to use the phrase:

"Starring at my (computer)screen, I got to know myself"

or

"In the reflection of my (computer)screen I got to know myself"

Now, I understand that it is anachronistic but it has to be in ancient Greek. First because my Professor (and future employer) should not be able to understand the sentence at a first glance, second because any modern language would not make sense and last as a jest to all those who use Greek phrases for all the wrong reasons, namely just to make things look interesting.

Of course any suggestions of phrases which are more in line with the ancients are more than welcome.

I hope you or anyone else would be so kind to help me.

Kind regards,

JAG
« Last Edit: 06 Mar, 2008, 14:25:49 by billberg23 »


jag

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Apart from the fact that it is anachronistic. Would this be correct:

Βλέπων γάρ δι' οθόνη ἐπέγνων ἐμαυτόν

Thanks for the help!


billberg23

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