Your English Accents

Leon · 33 · 10278

Elias71

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Elias71, of course the accent matters to me more, because at least the words will come out sounding Greek!

I guess it's a matter of opinion then. Personally, I would rather be able to speak properly grammatically and have the vocabulary to express myself in a million ways, than "sound Greek". I'm not saying that it's not a good idea to keep on speaking Greek so that you can work on pronounciation and all, but my priorities are on learning the language fully and worrying about pronounciation later (because lets be real, people can obviously understand you or me when we speak, it's not like they need to sit there trying to figure us out).

But then again, thats just the kind of person I am. I prefer being able to discuss important things with someone, and be able to express myself perfectly, then worry if my pronounciation was a bit off when I said this word, or that word. Don't forget, the people living in Greece have a million different accents themselves anyways; talk to someone up in the north, then somebody in the south, and then take a trip to Cyprus, and you will hear a dozen pronounciations of the same words, not to mention differences in the grammer. Nothing beats the northerners though, I love the way they talk, my uncle for example, πάντα έχει ιστορίες να με λέει!

(Please don't attack me now, because I know there are a lot of you on this site :P)
« Last Edit: 16 Mar, 2006, 23:48:31 by Elias71 »


Carolyn

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Carolyn, από πού είσαι;

Well...
French mother, New Zealand father, born in England, moved to Germany (where I went to German Kindergarten) when I was one, then to Kuwait when I was 6 (where I first went to French school and then English school) and then moved back to England when I was 9 and went English primary and secondary school and sixth form, and then university, and then moved to Greec three years ago.

Ooof! Now where am I from? That is the question...



Leon

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Elias71, I agree. That's what I was saying: I would rather speak perfectly grammatically etc. but with a Greek or Cypriot accent (as opposed to speaking brilliantly with a foreign accent). To be honest, I'm not sure if I can tell the difference between Greek accents since I'm not associated with many Greeks. My teacher is from Salonica (so I guess I may have a Thessalonican accent when I speak Greek) but everyone else is from Cyprus. I'd need to listen to an Athenian to notice any differences.

Carolyn, you certainly get around! Do you speak French? What languages can you speak?

Leon.
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
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Carolyn

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Carolyn, you certainly get around! Do you speak French? What languages can you speak?

Leon.

My native languages are French and English, although I only translate into English, and I studied German and Russian at university (although my Russian is very rusty now) and I speak Greek. I think my Greek is pretty ok, maybe someone who has met me can be a bettre judge of that.

That's all about me!



Elias71

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Elias71, I agree. That's what I was saying: I would rather speak perfectly grammatically etc. but with a Greek or Cypriot accent (as opposed to speaking brilliantly with a foreign accent).

Oh, I misunderstood you then. I thought you were worrying so much about the accent that you didn't care about the rest. My apologies. :)


Leon

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;)
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NadiaF

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Born in Egypt, lived in Libya, the US and Greece now... parents an odd mixture of origins (5 in total). Initally spoke Frech, English and Arabic at home; Greek with maternal grandparents; Arabic, French and Italian with paternal grandfathers; then, English kindergarten, French elementary school, English junior high and Greek senior high... does this make me a "polyglossitis" and "erimoglossitis"?... Most likely...

English accents? Various, depending to whom I am talking to... I sort of "adapt" to their accent. French? Like a "blackfoot". Italian? Like a Greek-American. Arabic? Like someone who has not spoken the language for a long time, but with a great accent... and finally, Greek; with a slight accent, but with a quite rich vocabulary...

Boy, I just realised that I am a mess :-((
Μην κοιμάσαι, είναι επικίνδυνο. Μην ξυπνήσεις, θα το μετανοιώσεις!
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Leon

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Very interesting!

How on earth did you manage with all that! Do you even have something that you could call your natural language? Which language do you know best? In which language do you think to yourself?

Whereabouts do you parents originate from?

Leon.
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
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NadiaF

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Very interesting!

How on earth did you manage with all that! Do you even have something that you could call your natural language? Which language do you know best? In which language do you think to yourself?

Whereabouts do you parents originate from?

Leon.
Hello Leo
I get confused sometimes and end using every language I know in a sentence. I would say that English is my natural and/or primary language, and the language I think in.

My parents origins?... brace yourself...Paternal grandparents: ggranma Autrian-Tunisian / ggdad Egyptian. Maternal grandparents: ggranma Greek-Venetian (of the Venetian that occupied Crete, hence the Greek) / ggradad Greek from Izmir (or Smyrni), then on to the island of Chios...

My paternal granparents eloped to Egypt because of the religion scandal. My maternal ones ended up in Egypt in search of a better life after the great earthquake in Chios (granpa)... and to escape the Turks (grandma). They were both born in Egypt... and set foot in Greece at quite an old age... in 1966,

Hmmmm... I just shocked myself again... But, there is more...

One of my father's maternal aunts married a Greek (and Orthodox), the other an Italian (Jew). My father's brother married a Greek-Italian (Catholic) lady and lives in Rome... His sister married a Bulgarian "emigree" (royalist and Orthodox) and still lives in Egypt. My paternal grandfather was Muslim and grandmother a Catholic - who secretly baptised her children, but as far as the state was concerned they were muslims (as I and my sister were when we were in Egypt, although baptised Greek Orthodox. My aunt now follows the Muslim religion, as does my cousin (who although baptised a Cathlic, does not know it... 

That's why the only label one cannot attach to me is "racist" of any kind. I am comfortable in any country in the world and with any religion. Actually, all this oddmixture has made me very open, receptive and accepting. And, I think that's a blessing in this modern world where you find all sorts of people living everywhere. I reject people only on the basis of "good person - bad person". I tend to be colour/race and religion blind and I wish more people could be like that. It would make for a better world on the whole.

I think you had enough by now... Sorry, if I bored you... Enjoy a wonderful Sunday :-)
Μην κοιμάσαι, είναι επικίνδυνο. Μην ξυπνήσεις, θα το μετανοιώσεις!
Nadia-Anastasia Fahmi


Leon

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Very interesting story! Not boring at all! So what on earth do all those origins make you? By the way were you referring to your grandparents or your great-grandparents (there is a 'g' in front of the words 'granddad' and 'grandma')?

OK, so you know English best, but you don't know it fluently, right? That's really odd; I'd hate to not know any language fluently. But I also agree with you on racism and how mixed descent opens doors for you. I think multiraciality is a very beautiful thing. I look at the real inside of people, not where they are from (I tend to like people because of their race, not hate them. I think that it is a very weak basis on which to hate someone). I also find it beyond me why in today's society people still believe that they are superior to another. Seriously, how on earth would anyone conclude that their race is better than another? In England, I think that Asians (Indians, Bangladeshis, Pakistanis) are targetted the most.

Leon.
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NadiaF

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Very interesting story! Not boring at all! So what on earth do all those origins make you? By the way were you referring to your grandparents or your great-grandparents (there is a 'g' in front of the words 'granddad' and 'grandma')?

gg = great-grand... I tend to be a lazy typist sometimes :-)

OK, so you know English best, but you don't know it fluently, right?

No, I am fluent in English, more so than Greek, although I've been living mostly in Greece since Aug 1966

I think multiraciality is a very beautiful thing. I look at the real inside of people...... I think that it is a very weak basis on which to hate someone).

I cannot agree more. I get so frustrated when people judge one another based on race in derogative terms... Been there, seen how it feels. When I first came to Greece, I was "i Arapina" (the Arab). I even had people says "Oh, you are from Africa! And how come you' re white? And green eyes? Odd, very odd". Once, a boyfriend's mother told me privately that she would never consent to our marrying, because we might have black children... 8-(((

I also find it beyond me why in today's society people still believe that they are superior to another. Seriously, how on earth would anyone conclude that their race is better than another?

That's a very no-non topic with me... Endless hours of heated debates... let's no get into that here... if you are ever in Athens, let's meet and discuss it... You would not believe the fights I've had with people (friends, family, bosses... even lost a job once because of this...)

Suddenly, I realised that it's nice to be talking about something other than translations, books, seminars etc.

Thanks, Leon, much appreciated...
Μην κοιμάσαι, είναι επικίνδυνο. Μην ξυπνήσεις, θα το μετανοιώσεις!
Nadia-Anastasia Fahmi


Leon

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Quote from: NadiaF
I cannot agree more. I get so frustrated when people judge one another based on race in derogative terms... Been there, seen how it feels. When I first came to Greece, I was "i Arapina" (the Arab). I even had people says "Oh, you are from Africa! And how come you' re white? And green eyes? Odd, very odd". Once, a boyfriend's mother told me privately that she would never consent to our marrying, because we might have black children... 8-(((

That's absolutely ridiculous! Greeks are supposed to be the most warm and kind people in the world (which very often they are), but they are a very racist people. I don't think I've ever met a Greek who fully accepts that every race is equal (well there is a Black 'Greek' family in our community, although I think the children's great-great-great-grandparents emigrated to Athens from Sudan, but they all consider themselves Greek after so many generations in Greece. There were also two half Cypriot half West Indian sisters, and they all seem(ed) to fit in well, but what everyone really thinks/thought is another thing). They may not be bothered about seeing so many persons of different origin, but deep down they would still be unhappy if, for example, their child wanted to marry one. I think Greeks (by that I am including Cypriots) give the cold shoulder to their own who are brought up abroad (even if it's just calling them "Άγγλο" or whatever).

I've also noticed that many racist people are actually deeply religious. That's also beyond me.

Quote from: NadiaF
That's a very no-non topic with me... Endless hours of heated debates... let's no get into that here... if you are ever in Athens, let's meet and discuss it... You would not believe the fights I've had with people (friends, family, bosses... even lost a job once because of this...)

My grandma would really like you! She is very anti-racist (which is quite surprising for an English lady of her generation) and cringes when people insult Black people in particular. One of her Black friend's son (whose (White) father has some Cypriot descent, too, I believe) was at a bus top when two men waiting beside him were called him "Black b*stard!", and she said if she'd've been there she doesn't know what she'd've done (most probably hit them, knowing her). There's not a day goes by where we talk about racism and she always says "The White man destroys everything". It's true, though. She'd be happy for you sticking up for your rights, whether jobs and friends are lost or not. The thing that scares me the most is people in authority who are racist (i.e. police, politicians (George Bush) etc.). I better stop or else I'll get carried away...

Quote from: NadiaF
Suddenly, I realised that it's nice to be talking about something other than translations, books, seminars etc.

Thanks, Leon, much appreciated...


My pleasure!

Leon.
« Last Edit: 02 Apr, 2006, 13:19:38 by Leon »
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
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Leon

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There was a link to a website posted over a year ago, by now, during a discussion on the English accents and what is perceived as correct. One of this forum's members (I don't remember which, though) gave a link to a site where examples of English, Scottish, Welsh, Irish, American, and Canadian (and maybe another one, I'm not sure) were spoken by speakers native to the respective regions. The trouble is I've searched and searched for the site (and tried to retrieve the post) but to no avail. Can someone help?

A massive thanks in advance.

Leon.
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
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F_idάνι

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You might be looking for this:

https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=2558.0

(I hope so :-)

Anyway, the only link there is the one about rhotic and non-rhotic accents but the discussion might ring a bell :-)
« Last Edit: 25 May, 2007, 03:11:18 by F_idάνι »


corazondemelon

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I feel this as a lovely issue. When I took the TESL-TEFL exams they were explicit that accent is of no importance. It was lovely to see other members of this Forum, what (super) mixed backgrounds they come from,and what a versatile community we are!
I suppose as long as we can make ourselves understood, it's O.K. but I feel that someone with an appalling accent should not be teaching... and as we are a Greek Forum, I feel that the Greek contingent would take a poor view of foreigners teaching Greek in obviously foreign accents.
I am like many of our Forum members, culturally " salade macedoine" and I get by plausibly with any language. That does not mean that I have one  accent that someone could pinpoint at: "My Fair Lady" where he can pinpoint exactly what street Eliza Doolittle was born in, in London. But lets not go to extremes!
Great issue.


 

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