hammer beam -> αντηρίδα

Guest · 8 · 2199

  • Guest
ειδικά δοκάρια σε οροφή παλατιού γοτθικού ρυθμού.

The hammer beams support the arch meaning the roof span can be much wider and it's ludicrously over the top, decorated...
« Last Edit: 05 Apr, 2006, 17:33:25 by wings »


wings

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 70814
    • Gender:Female
  • Vicky Papaprodromou
Θαρρώ πως είναι το «πελεκημένο δοκάρι» αλλά δεν ευκαιρώ να το ψάξω αυτή τη στιγμή.



Pink Panther

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1675
    • Gender:Female
  • Τσα!
Καλησπέρα,
για δες εδώ μήπως και σε βοηθήσει:
« Last Edit: 05 Apr, 2006, 16:28:41 by wings »
Κάθε που νιώθω μοναξιά, σκέφτομαι πως υπάρχεις
Και θέλω να 'ρθω εκεί κοντά, τίποτα να μην πάθεις


banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 132
    • Gender:Male
Μπράβο, Χριστίνα, αυτό το επισημασμένο σκίτσο βρήκα κι εγώ πιο εξυπηρετικό από τα άλλα, γι' αυτό επίτρεψέ μου να το μοστράρω εδώ:



Ένα ενδιαφέρον κείμενο από το BBC:
Ray Holden from Middlesborough told of a visit last summer to a church where there was a hammer beam roof – and a quite magnificent roof it was too. Everyone was staring up at in wonder. But once he got home, he realised he did not really know what a hammer beam roof is and why it is so called.

Owen Jordan, who has written his own guide to English churches, explained that a hammer beam roof was an ingenious way of spanning a space. A hammer beam is a series of cantilevers which lean against each other in the middle of the church. It works because it moves the load from the roof to half way down the walls – where the stone in the walls can act as the other half of the cantilever – resisting the turning moments of the roof itself. It is called a hammer beam primarily because of the embossed nature of the posts which form the struts and the braces within the hammer.

It is an excuse for some fancy timber work, although it is completely structural as a concept. The decoration is a bonus once the important work of building a firm and secure roof is. The method is used mainly in the nave of churches, since the nave is a large space and the intention of the hammer beam is to span large spaces. Aisles, the choir and the chancel, being smaller spaces, do not necessarily require such a structure.

The hammer beam was one the later forms of timber roofs devised for spanning large spaces. One of the earliest forms was the ridge tree which simply has a timber beam running down the middle of the nave on which rafters rest at their top end – the other end resting on the stone wall.

Hammer beam roofs were quite widely used in late medieval and Tudor times. They can be seen in many East Anglian churches (e.g. Bacton in Norfolk, Woolpit in Suffolk), at some Oxford colleges, in the halls of the Royal palaces at Westminster, Eltham and Hampton Court, and in some country houses, e.g. Carew Manor at Beddington in Surrey.

A refinement of this was the king post truss, which manages to support a purlin, which runs along and support the rafters at mid span. This developed into the queen post method and then, in the later period of church construction, there are a number of timber structures such as the Warren trusses which are used in nineteenth-century churches.


Να τι λέει κι ο Πάπυρος για την αντηρίδα:
η (AM ἀντηρίς)· (νεοελλ.) 1. δοκός ή άλλη ανάλογη κατασκευή (ξύλινη, πέτρινη, μεταλλική) που χρησιμεύει ως στήριγμα στις εκσκαφές και στην οικοδομική· 2. εσωτερικό ενισχυτικό στήριγμα, που προεξέχει από την όψη ενός τοίχου και χρησιμεύει είτε για την ενίσχυση του τοίχου είτε για την αντιστήριξη των πλάγιων ωθήσεων των τόξων ή της στέγης

Επειδή υπάρχουν πολλές και διάφορες αντηρίδες και επειδή ετούτη εδώ τη χάρη την έχει και στο όνομα, προτείνω σκαλιστή αντηρίδα. Αντιρρήσεις;

P.S. Από την άλλη, επειδή πια η λέξη έχει χάσει την αρχική σημασία του "σκαλιστού", ίσως να είναι παραπλανητικό στα ελληνικά. Βαλ' το σκέτο αντηρίδα να κάνεις τη δουλειά σου και, όταν περάσει κανένας αρχιτέκτονας από τα μέρη μας, βλέπουμε.
« Last Edit: 05 Apr, 2006, 17:16:53 by nickel »



  • Guest
αχ βρε νίκος, πάντα με υποχρεώνεις.
χίλια ευχαριστώ και στους ροδαλούς και φτερωτούς συναδέλφους για το άμεσο ενδιαφέρον τους.

να προσθέσω και εγώ κάτι από την εκπομπή που μου φάνηκε αρκετά ενδιαφέρον

Η αίθουσα τελετών του παλατιού Χάμπτον Κορτ έχει περίτεχνη οροφή...

"On every hammerbeam there is a little chap leaning over and apparently looking down and listening to what's going on below, to all the scandal and gossip among the courtiers. We don't know who those chaps are but in fact, because they are in the eaves they came to be called eavesdroppers"

καλό, ε;
« Last Edit: 05 Apr, 2006, 17:33:07 by maria_pol »


kik

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 35
    • Gender:Male
Συμφωνώ, nickel. Ίσως περιττεύει το "σκαλιστή", τουλάχιστο στη πρόταση της maria_pol.

Quote
It is called a hammer beam primarily because of the embossed nature of the posts which form the struts and the braces within the hammer.

Θα έλεγα "αντηρίδα" ή "προεξέχουσα αντηρίδα"


wings

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 70814
    • Gender:Female
  • Vicky Papaprodromou
Μετά το σύνδεσμο που μας έδωσε η Χριστίνα, συμφωνώ κι εγώ για την «αντηρίδα».


Pink Panther

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1675
    • Gender:Female
  • Τσα!
Εγώ πάντως απορώ πώς βλέποντας αυτή την εικόνα βρήκατε και την αντίστοιχη λέξη. Τη γνωρίζατε ήδη; Δε θα μπορούσα ποτέ να τη βρω. Μπράβο σας!!!!
Κάθε που νιώθω μοναξιά, σκέφτομαι πως υπάρχεις
Και θέλω να 'ρθω εκεί κοντά, τίποτα να μην πάθεις


 

Search Tools