do no harm -> μὴ βλάπτειν

Offline Joe Ramon

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Please could you advise on the pronunciation too?

Thank you

do no harm (Hippocrates, Epidemics 1.5) -> Μὴ βλάπτειν
« Last Edit: 12 May, 2019, 11:30:37 by spiros »


Offline billberg23

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MH BΛΑΠΤΕΙΝ  (Μὴ βλάπτειν)
Pronounced "mee vlahp-teen"

This query really belongs in the English -> Ancient Greek forum.  It's from Hippocrates.  His full statement was
ΩΦΕΛΕEΙΝ, Η ΜΗ ΒΛΑΠΤΕΙΝ  —  "Help, or do no harm."
« Last Edit: 10 Jun, 2009, 18:32:13 by billberg23 »
Τί δέ τις; Τί δ' οὔ τις; Σκιᾶς ὄναρ ἄνθρωπος. — Πίνδαρος



Online spiros

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Indeed, that is the least people can do if they are not much to ΩΦΕΛΕΙΝ :)


Offline ruralmedau

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ἐπὶ δηλήσει δὲ καὶ ἀδικίῃ εἴρξειν

i have someone that says this would literally translate to  "“from both injury and injustice to refrain'’  which is what would translate into do no harm in english

any comments?



Offline vbd.

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Offline billberg23

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ἐπὶ δηλήσει δὲ καὶ ἀδικίῃ εἴρξειν
This is the wording of the Hippocratic oath, which is probably not by Hippocrates and may have been written long after his time.  The only "do no harm" that we have in a work actually attributed to Hippocrates is the above-cited Μὴ βλάπτειν.  Cf. Wikipedia:

The origin of the phrase is uncertain. The Hippocratic Oath includes the promise "to abstain from doing harm" (Greek: ἐπὶ δηλήσει δὲ καὶ ἀδικίῃ εἴρξειν) but not the precise phrase. Perhaps the closest approximation in the Hippocratic Corpus is in Epidemics: "The physician must...have two special objects in view with regard to disease, namely, to do good or to do no harm" (Bk. I, Sect. 5, trans. Adams, Greek: ἀσκέειν, περὶ τὰ νουσήματα, δύο, ὠφελέειν, ἢ μὴ βλάπτειν).
Τί δέ τις; Τί δ' οὔ τις; Σκιᾶς ὄναρ ἄνθρωπος. — Πίνδαρος


 

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