Author Topic: Tattoos and Ancient Greek  (Read 1021516 times)

Brona

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Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« on: 19 Feb, 2005, 19:10:18 »
id love to have this translated for a tattoo i want.
thanks

Moderator's note: As this thread has grown out of all proportion, you are kindly requested to start a new topic, even if it is for a tattoo, on the English -> Ancient Greek Translation Forum (click on Start new topic and make sure you enter the phrase you want translated—and only that phrase— on the Subject field). This will make it easier to handle as well as follow topics.
« Last Edit: 16 Feb, 2011, 11:21:59 by spiros »


wings

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« Reply #1 on: 19 Feb, 2005, 19:14:06 »
Hi there.

Your phrase can be:

"Τη μέρα που θα μάθω να πετώ δεν θα ξαναπατήσω στη γη"

All the best for the weekend,

Vicky

ladragona1246

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Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2 on: 08 Mar, 2005, 12:35:50 »
I am of Greek descent and am getting a tattoo for my birthday. I would like to have the phrase "release your inner dragon" tattooed above the dragon and "fire and ice" below the dragon. I find that lowercase letters are more attractive. This is what the translator program gave me and since I am a new student of Greek I am still somewhat confused as to word order. Since I will be travelling soon to Crete to visit my grandmother's family I really don't want to have the wording wrong on the tattoo and get laughed at. Here's what I have...

απελευθερώστε τον εσωτερικό δράκος (release the inner dragon) but would rather have "release your inner dragon"

and

πυρκαγιά και πάγος

Please correct these for me. Thank you very much. I should mention that I am a female if this helps.


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Απ: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
« Reply #3 on: 08 Mar, 2005, 12:55:51 »
Hi there.

The second one "fire and ice" is definitely "φωτιά και πάγος"

As for the first one I would go for "Ελευθέρωσε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου" or "Δείξε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου".

Ι hope this helps.

All the best,

Vicky

ladragona1246

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Re: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
« Reply #4 on: 08 Mar, 2005, 13:14:08 »
Which one of the 2 suggestions is more in keeping with what I am trying to say? I tried finding a translation for "Unleash your inner dragon" but kept getting "start the internal dragon". Also what is the difference between "δράκο" and "δράκος" which when I translate the first I get dra'ko and the second I get dragon. And every time I type fire in the translator I get pirkagia "πυρκαγιά". But OK I translated the word that you gave me and got fire too. But with the 2 phrases that you gave me, which of the 2 is more in keeping with what I am trying to say?

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Απ: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
« Reply #5 on: 08 Mar, 2005, 13:26:09 »
Well, I would go for the first one: "Ελευθέρωσε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου".

Ιn Modern Greek there are still grammar cases, so "δράκος" is the nominative (e.g. The dragon is here = Ο δράκος είναι εδώ) while "δράκο" is the accusative (e.g. Show me the dragon = Δείξε μου το δράκο).

Αs for your second phrase, we use "πυρκαγιά" when something is on fire (e.g. prevention of summer fires) while "φωτιά" is the essence of the word (e.g. elements of the nature = fire, air, water). Thus, you can't use "πυρκαγιά" together with "ice".

Is everything clear now? :-)

Vicky


ladragona1246

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Re: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
« Reply #6 on: 08 Mar, 2005, 13:37:30 »
Yes that clears everything right up! Thanks again so much! Guess I need to really hit the books!

ladragona1246

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Re: Απ: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
« Reply #7 on: 08 Mar, 2005, 17:00:51 »
Well, I would go for the first one: "Ελευθέρωσε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου".

Ιn Modern Greek there are still grammar cases, so "δράκος" is the nominative (e.g. The dragon is here = Ο δράκος είναι εδώ) while "δράκο" is the accusative (e.g. Show me the dragon = Δείξε μου το δράκο).

Αs for your second phrase, we use "πυρκαγιά" when something is on fire (e.g. prevention of summer fires) while "φωτιά" is the essence of the word (e.g. elements of the nature = fire, air, water). Thus, you can't use "πυρκαγιά" together with "ice".

Is everything clear now? :-)

Vicky

One question though... I am a little confused about tense..it seems to me that "Ελευθέρωσε το δράκο που κρύβεις μέσα σου" is in the past tense, or am I misunderstanding this? Sorry to be such a pain, but since this is something so personal to me I want to make sure it's right. Thanks again for all the help!

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Απ: "Release Your Inner Dragon" & "fire and ice"
« Reply #8 on: 08 Mar, 2005, 17:08:36 »
It just happens for this verb, that the second singular person imperative of simple future is the same word with the third singular person of the simple past tense.

First person for future is "ελευθερώσω" and first person for past simple is "ελευθέρωσα" [singular in both cases].

All the best,

Vicky

struts

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Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #9 on: 29 Apr, 2005, 10:03:33 »
I want to get the word 'hoplite' or the Greek equivelent of 'infantryman' tatooed on my body.  I am a really big fan of Greek military Histroy and I am a modern day Hoplite myself so I really want the translation to be correct. I would be much obliged if someone could lend me a hand.  Thanks.

phil
« Last Edit: 18 Feb, 2007, 03:42:31 by wings »

banned8

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Re: hoplite
« Reply #10 on: 29 Apr, 2005, 13:45:07 »
It would look like this, in this beautiful font. You can right-click on it and download it on your computer and then print it out. But before you have it tatooed on your body, get the OK of other members.

herzog3000

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Re: hoplite
« Reply #11 on: 29 Apr, 2005, 19:14:22 »
Modern day hoplite?? Curious...

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Απ: hoplite
« Reply #12 on: 04 May, 2005, 17:23:44 »
Both Modern and Ancient Greek. You see this language is really glorious. Most of its words are still the same, 3000 years after they had first appeared.

Demo

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music -> μουσική
« Reply #13 on: 21 May, 2005, 03:49:52 »
Hallo, now that I found this site I really think the Internet is really a useful tool, what a wonderful surprise...I'll introduce my question: my name's Demis I'm an Italian guy with a greek name(ehy by the way does anybody have greek friends or relatives with the same name? Demis and not Denis?I'd like to know if there is someone else in this planet who shares my name...never met him)I regard music as one of the most important things in my life and I would really love to get a tattoo of the greek word for music...CAN YOU HELP ME PLEASE???

I started my research in dictionaries and found out mousiké but I would like to know if there is more than one form of it (I studied Latin at school and I know the words change with the casus - nominativus, gaenitivus, etc...), if there's a difference between modern and ancient greek versions, what's the right pronunciation of it, is there just a correct form of writning it or is there a normal one and a more aulic one with long or short accents? God, I really would like to get the chance to learn this beautiful language...I hope you will have the time to help me
 
Grazie Demis
« Last Edit: 18 Feb, 2007, 15:50:25 by wings »

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Απ: MUSIC
« Reply #14 on: 21 May, 2005, 04:01:15 »
Hi Demis.

The Greek word for "music" is : Μουσική  -  ΜΟΥΣΙΚΗ  -  μουσική

There is one word only and it is pronounced /mousi'ki/ ("ou" as in "soup")

As for your name, there is a world-famous Greek singer, DEMIS ROUSSOS.

Quite a few Greeks have the same name.

All the best for the weekend,

Vicky
« Last Edit: 21 May, 2005, 05:04:27 by nickel »