Author Topic: Tattoos and Ancient Greek  (Read 1060162 times)

Philip

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 340
  • Gender: Male
  • μεγαλώνουν, μεγαλώνουν ...
Re: MUSIC
« Reply #15 on: 23 May, 2005, 14:59:36 »
hi Demis.

Yes, there are two forms of the word μουσική:  μουσική (which is nominative and accusative) and μουσικής which is genitive.  The difference between nominative and accusative can be seen in the form of the definite article, which is η μουσική  for the nominative and τη μουσική for the accusative.

ciao

Philip
But how shall men meditate in that, which they cannot understand? How shall they understand that which is kept close in an unknown tongue?

THE TRANSLATORS TO THE READER
Preface to the King James Version 1611


Demo

  • Guest
Re: MUSIC
« Reply #16 on: 24 May, 2005, 16:18:36 »
wow thanks a lot for your quick help guys i really appreciated i will be surfing through these web pages a lot in the future ciao ciao

mysticora

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Gender: Female
    • Evershore
Keep true to the dreams of thy youth
« Reply #17 on: 23 Jul, 2005, 22:05:47 »
This is a quote by someone I don't remember the name of. *blush* But I want it tattooed on my back in greek and in greek letters, so would anyone kind enough help me translate this? Love, Emelie


banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 133
  • Gender: Male
Re: Keep true to the dreams of thy youth
« Reply #18 on: 24 Jul, 2005, 13:42:45 »
A quick google search and a cross-check tell me this is by Friedrich von Schiller, Germany's great poet, the one who wrote the Ode to Joy, used by Beethoven at the end of his Ninth Symphony.

My Greek version for this would be:

Μείνε πιστός στα όνειρα της νιότης σου.

ΜΕΙΝΕ ΠΙΣΤΟΣ ΣΤΑ ΟΝΕΙΡΑ ΤΗΣ ΝΙΟΤΗΣ ΣΟΥ.

mysticora

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Gender: Female
    • Evershore
Re: Keep true to the dreams of thy youth
« Reply #19 on: 04 Aug, 2005, 18:31:36 »
That's right :) Thanks

Thank you so much for the translation!

banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 133
  • Gender: Male
Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #20 on: 16 Aug, 2005, 23:20:47 »
This site has received many a request for the translation of English words or phrases into Ancient Greek. These Ancient Greek words or phrases are often to be used in permanent or semi-permanent markings on people’s skin, otherwise known as tattoos.

Ancient Greek is a dead language. So is the Greek of Hellenistic times used in the New Testament. It is one thing to ask for what someone said in a specific play or epic or passage of the Bible, and a completely different thing to ask for any odd word or phrase to be reproduced in some form of Ancient Greek. Which form? The Greek of the Bible? Homer’s Greek? The Attic Greek? (i.e. the Greek of classical times, Plato's Greek; not the Greek you have conveniently stashed away in the attic).

And what’s the use of having something printed on your skin which no one will understand and may well be wrong because someone here got the wrong idea of what you wanted?

“The vengeance is mine” does not come from any Ancient Greek writings. It is a Jewish relic in the Christian religion. Paul says in his epistle to the Romans (12:19), “for it is written: Vengeance is mine; I will repay” (which harks back to the Deuteronomy 32:35, “To me belongeth vengeance, and recompense”, «εν ημέρα εκδικήσεως ανταποδώσω»).

Now the Greek in Romans for “Vengeance is mine; I will repay” is:
εμοί εκδίκησις - εγώ ανταποδώσω

I’m glad to say that the meaning of ανταποδώσω in modern Greek is more likely to have a positive meaning (“I’ll repay you for the good you have done me”).

P.S. This does not mean that I'm prepared to find or invent a translation for Nietzsche's “What does not destroy me, makes me stronger”.
« Last Edit: 18 Jun, 2006, 11:35:53 by wings »


wings

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 64938
  • Gender: Female
  • Vicky Papaprodromou
    • vicky.papaprodromou
    • ThePoetsILoved
    • papaprodromou
    • 116102296922009513407
    • hellenicwings
    • Ποίηση, ποιητές, ποιήματα, Θεσσαλονίκη
Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #21 on: 16 Aug, 2005, 23:43:23 »
I definitely agree with you, Nickel and I am glad you created a thread on this issue.

I have been trying hard to explain this same thing to the askers for months now. Classic or Bible Greek or Classic Latin cannot and should not be used to express just any idea that occurs to us. Modern phrases need to make sense in order to be translated into any Classic language and all aspects must be taken into account - history, culture, customs of each era.

E.g. you can't ask how to say 'Merry Christmas' in Ancient Greek since Christianity did not exist then - thus, any translation of this phrase would definitely be sheer nonsense in Ancient Greek.

spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 363587
  • Gender: Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • 102094522373850556729
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #22 on: 17 Aug, 2005, 00:04:49 »
Indeed, it will be a good idea to post a link to this thread to any future askers.

wings

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 64938
  • Gender: Female
  • Vicky Papaprodromou
    • vicky.papaprodromou
    • ThePoetsILoved
    • papaprodromou
    • 116102296922009513407
    • hellenicwings
    • Ποίηση, ποιητές, ποιήματα, Θεσσαλονίκη
Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #23 on: 17 Aug, 2005, 00:09:24 »
Right you are - I have already done so in some recent questions.

frem

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 71
Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #24 on: 17 Aug, 2005, 02:16:33 »
Συγγνώμη, αλλά όταν πληροφορούμαστε ότι ένας Άγγλος καθηγητής έχει μεταφράσει στα αρχαία ελληνικά τον... Χάρυ Πότερ, δεν νομίζω ότι μπορεί να θεωρείται γλωσσικά αδύνατη η απόδοση στην αρχαία γλώσσα μιας πρότασης του τύπου "Ό,τι δεν με σκοτώνει με κάνει πιο δυνατό". Να υπενθυμίσω ότι το 90% της τρισχιλιετούς μας γραμματείας είναι γραμμένο στα αρχαία και ότι ακόμα και συγγραφείς που η μητρική τους γλώσσα δεν διέφερε πολύ από τη σύγχρονη δική μας (Μιχαήλ Ψελλός, Άννα Κομνηνή κτλ) μπορούσαν να εκφράζουν τις σκέψεις τους σε άπταιστα κλασσικά ελληνικά;

banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 133
  • Gender: Male
Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #25 on: 17 Aug, 2005, 02:41:03 »
Και ο Αστερίξ έχει μεταφραστεί σε αρχαία και νομίζω το in.gr έβγαζε κάποτε τις κυριότερες ειδήσεις και στην αρχαία ελληνική.

Απλώς οι επισκέπτες πετάνε ένα "μου μεταφράζετε αυτό στα αρχαία ελληνικά" και πρέπει στη συνέχεια να μαντέψεις πού του ήρθε, πού το βρήκε -- είναι κάτι που διάβασε στο διαδίκτυο και ανήκει στον Ηρόδοτο ή στον Όμηρο; Ή μήπως είναι από τη Βίβλο; Ή μήπως είναι κάποιο από τα αποσπάσματα που έχει υποστεί παραφθορά στο διαδίκτυο και έχει γίνει αγνώριστο;

Και αφού κάνεις τον ντετέκτιβ, γιατί φυσικά πολλά, τα περισσότερα μάλλον, τα αγνοούμε, ποιος μας λέει, αν πρόκειται για Νίτσε, ας πούμε, τι είναι αυτό που θέλει ακριβώς ο ερωτών; Σε ποια γλώσσα να του τον μεταφράσεις τον Νίτσε; Γιατί οι μισοί ξένοι, όταν λένε αρχαία ελληνικά, εννοούν τα ελληνικά της Καινής Διαθήκης.

Και τι νόημα έχει να μεταφράσεις εντέλει ένα τσιτάτο του Τσόρτσιλ στα αρχαία ελληνικά (ένα απόσπασμα ολόκληρο του Τσόρτσιλ θυμάμαι ότι μετέφρασα όταν έδινα αρχαία για GCE και μου έχει μείνει ο εφιάλτης της όλης υπόθεσης), με μεγάλη πιθανότητα να μην το πεις εξίσου καλά με τον κύριο καθηγητή που μετέφρασε τον Χάρι Πότερ (άσε που είδα ένα απόσπασμα και, αν θυμάμαι καλά, κάγχασα) και να πάει ο άλλος και να κεντήσει τη δική σου παπάρα πάνω στο δέρμα του...

Να μεταφράσει λοιπόν κάποιος αρμοδιότερος ολόκληρο τον Σέξπιρ στη γλώσσα του Ομήρου αν του κάνει κέφι, αλλά θα προτιμούσα να αποθαρρύνω τον κάθε περαστικό να κάνει τατουάζ με το "I'll be back" του Σβαρτσενέγκερ στη γλώσσα του Σοφοκλή. Τι στο καλό; Χάθηκαν οι καρδούλες και οι γοργόνες;

frem

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 71
Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #26 on: 17 Aug, 2005, 03:05:11 »
Δεν διαφωνώ σ' αυτά που γράφεις -γλαφυρότατα, ως συνήθως- Nickel, αλλά περιοριζόμενος στο αυστηρά γλωσσικό μέρος, νομίζω ότι γενικά είναι εφικτή η μετάφραση τέτοιων προτάσεων στα αρχαία ελληνικά. Το "ό,τι δεν με σκοτώνει με κάνει πιο δυνατό", αν το φτιάξεις σε τρίτο πρόσωπο, βρεις τις κατάλληλες λέξεις και βάλεις και καμιά μετοχή, μια χαρά αρχαιοελληνικό ρητό μπορεί να γίνει. ;)

banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 133
  • Gender: Male
Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #27 on: 17 Aug, 2005, 03:18:48 »
Το να πω κάτι του τύπου "ό μη απολλύει με ενδυναμοί με", με κίνδυνο (α) να γίνω ρεζίλι σε όσους ξέρουν καλά αρχαία, (β) να αρχίσει μια ατέρμονη συζήτηση του είδους "μα γιατί δεν έβαλες εκείνο;" και "μήπως θα είναι καλύτερη η δοτική;" --όλα τα γνωστά που συμβαίνουν όταν δεν έχουμε να κάνουμε με το τσιτάτο κάποιου πιο σοβαρού και ξακουστού-- αυτό ακριβώς είναι που προσπαθώ να αποφύγω.

Και άλλο είναι να κοτσάρει ο τυπάς ένα κομμάτι Ισοκράτη στην ωμοπλάτη του και άλλο να γυρνά με ένα τσιτάτο του Νίτσε σε (κουτσή) μετάφραση nickel. Αυτά τα κουτσά είναι που με χαλάνε...

wings

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 64938
  • Gender: Female
  • Vicky Papaprodromou
    • vicky.papaprodromou
    • ThePoetsILoved
    • papaprodromou
    • 116102296922009513407
    • hellenicwings
    • Ποίηση, ποιητές, ποιήματα, Θεσσαλονίκη
Απ: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #28 on: 17 Aug, 2005, 03:19:50 »
Αγαπητέ ή αγαπητή frem (μιας και στο προφίλ σου δεν μας έχεις 'χαρίσει' ούτε το φύλο σου),

Τα πάντα μπορούν να γίνουν μια χαρά αρχαία ρητά αλλά καλό θα ήταν πρώτα να διαβάσουμε και να μάθουμε όλοι μας τα προϋπάρχοντα αυθεντικά αρχαία ρητά και μετά να συνθέσουμε νέα δικά μας και μάλιστα κατά παραγγελίαν.

Μα για να καταλάβω τώρα πού ακριβώς το πάμε: οι μελετητές των αρχαίων κειμένων κι όσοι μπορούν και γράφουν και ενδεχομένως μιλούν τις αρχαίες γλώσσες του κόσμου, ακόμη και σήμερα (ξέρω κάποιους) είναι ίσα κι όμοια με όποιον δεν ξέρει ούτε καν ποιος έγραψε τι (συνήθως) στην ξένη γλώσσα κι ένα ωραίο πρωί που του γυάλισε μια φράση, λέξη ή στίχος, θέλει να την κάνει τατουάζ;

Λυπάμαι αλλά θα θεωρήσω τον παραλληλισμό μεταξύ όσων ασχολούμαστε με τούτο το κομμάτι του φόρουμ και της μακαρίτισσας της Άννας της Κομνηνής και του άλλου μακαρίτη του Μιχαήλ Ψελλού μάλλον ατυχή και αβάσιμο - μακάρι να τους φτάσουμε κάποτε έστω στο νυχάκι τους.

Όσο για την πρόχειρη πρόταση περί της μετάφρασης του "ό,τι δεν με σκοτώνει, με κάνει πιο δυνατό", την θεωρώ χαριτωμένη αλλά εκ πρώτης όψεως δεν βλέπω πού θα κολλούσε η μετοχή... ίσως εκ δευτέρας (όψεως πάντα) την βρω για να αποκτήσει καλύτερη όψη το μπράτσο κάποιου ερωτώντος. Αλλά αυτή την καλή πράξη της ημέρας μάλλον θα την αφήσω για αύριο και θα χαρώ πολύ αν τώρα που μας έδωσες το έναυσμα τη βρεις πρώτος/πρώτη εσύ ή κάποιος άλλος.



frem

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 71
Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #29 on: 17 Aug, 2005, 03:47:36 »
Στα άρρενα μέλη του φόρουμ ανήκω, wings. Μου φαίνεται, πάντως, ότι υπεκφεύγεις λιγάκι, αφού ο λόγος που "αρνήθηκες" να μεταφράσεις τη ρήση του Νίτσε δεν ήταν η σκοπούμενη ευτελής της χρήση ως τατουάζ από πλευράς του ερωτώντος, αλλά το ότι:

"Some phrases are just out of the scope of classic languages like Ancient Greek or Latin."

Νομίζω ότι αυτό γλωσσολογικά δεν ευσταθεί. Αλλά είναι μεγάλη η συζήτηση για να την κάνουμε τέτοια ώρα.