Tattoos and Ancient Greek

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billberg23

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Different manuscripts of the New Testament have slightly different versions of the text, all going back to an original (lost) manuscript.  A third manuscript, for example, has this version: Ὁ ἀναμάρτητος ὑμῶν πρῶτος τὸν λίθον ἐπ' αὐτὴν βαλέτω ("the stone" instead of "a stone").  Apparently what you want are the words "let him throw a stone at her," which would be ἐπ' αὐτὴν βαλέτω λίθον,  βαλέτω λίθον ἐπ' αὐτὴν, or ἐπ' αὐτὴν λίθον βαλέτω — whichever word order pleases you.
Quote
I don't understand the disclaimer! Isn't this forum about greek tattoos? It's only mine that is disrespectful?
Nothing to do with respect or disrespect.  But when people are about to mutilate their bodies with quotations from the Bible, it seems only fair to advise them of the Bible's position.
« Last Edit: 15 Dec, 2010, 17:11:10 by billberg23 »


marisa1980

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Different manuscripts of the New Testament have slightly different versions of the text, all going back to an original (lost) manuscript.  A third manuscript, for example, has this version: Ὁ ἀναμάρτητος ὑμῶν πρῶτος τὸν λίθον ἐπ' αὐτὴν βαλέτω ("the stone" instead of "a stone").  Apparently what you want are the words "let him throw a stone at her," which would be ἐπ' αὐτὴν βαλέτω λίθον,  βαλέτω λίθον ἐπ' αὐτὴν, or ἐπ' αὐτὴν λίθον βαλέτω — whichever word order pleases you.Nothing to do with respect or disrespect.  But when people are about to mutilate their bodies with quotations from the Bible, it seems only fair to advise them of the Bible's position.

Hi again..
Ok, thank you for the attention call.. I understand perfectly what you mean now.

What I want is the all quote, without "at her" in the end. "He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone"

As your translation is similar to the one in the site that has the full quote, I asked if in your version, you took the "at her".

"At her"  is: ἐπ' αὐτὴν ?

Thanks
« Last Edit: 15 Dec, 2010, 18:41:38 by marisa1980 »




marisa1980

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Yes, indeed.


Right..

Then it will make perfect sense if I write:

 Ὁ ἀναμάρτητος ὑμῶν πρῶτος βαλέτω λίθον   -   He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone

Correct?

Thank you for your answers.



billberg23

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Ὁ ἀναμάρτητος ὑμῶν πρῶτος βαλέτω λίθον   -   He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone
Correct?
Correct.


Cobrinha

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Hi,

Could you please help me with a translation for a tattoo, preferably in Greek lower case, for a saying a coach/mentor of mine said which was -

"Never let things happen .. Make them happen"

Thank you very much,
« Last Edit: 17 Feb, 2011, 17:47:25 by spiros »


billberg23

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"Never let things happen .. Make them happen"
The idiom would of course be very different in ancient Greek, something like
Μὴ πάσχειν ποτέ, ἀλλὰ δρῶντα φθάνειν σε παραινῶ.
— literally, "Never to let (things) happen, but to be first to do (them), I exhort you."
« Last Edit: 23 Dec, 2010, 17:17:24 by billberg23 »


DareDevilBabe

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I'm Greek not full Greek (which sucks) but Greek none the less and I was wondering if I could get some phrases translated by real translators not google haha. The phrases are (prederably in Greek lower case)
1. "When all is gone, there still is hope",

2. "If you have to crawl to live, stand and die",

3. "What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others",

and lastly

4. "Let me stand on my feet and I will control the earth."

 Sorry for so many but I from these I will pick but they all have a meaning in my life one way or another.
Thanks so very much!!


billberg23

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1. "When all is gone, there still is hope",
2. "If you have to crawl to live, stand and die",
3. "What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others",
and lastly
4. "Let me stand on my feet and I will control the earth."
As advised, please read "The Rules" before posting (click at top of page), esp. Rules 1.4 and 1.5.  BTW, these are all very popular tattoos here, so must have "meaning" for many others.  If you had made use of our search engine, you would have found the following:
1. https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=45566.0 (Reply #6)
2. https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.1515 (Reply #1518)
3. https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=84929.0
4. https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=69908.0.
« Last Edit: 23 Dec, 2010, 20:01:07 by billberg23 »


Cobrinha

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Quote
The idiom would of course be very different in ancient Greek, something like
Μὴ πάσχειν ποτέ, ἀλλὰ δρῶντα φθάνειν σε παραινῶ.
— literally, "Never to let (things) happen, but to be first to do (them), I exhort you."


 Thank you!, and sorry to bother you again but could you also do the same for "Relish the challenge"


 Thank you again and seasons greetings!.



billberg23

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"Relish the challenge"
 Thank you again and seasons greetings!.
Εὐφραίνου ἐπὶ τῇ προκλήσει
Season's greetings to you, too!


Jose

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 Hello,  I'm so glad I found this wonderful site!.  I've been looking for a translation for a motivational phrase linked into wrestling (the Greek connection) for -

 "Just earn it"

 I know this wont translate smoothly to ancient Greek, but the context of this is basically ,  do all what it takes so that you 'deserve' your ideal goal/outcome.

 Can you help me?
 
 
 Thanks,


billberg23

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"Just earn it"
The verb ἐκπονεῖσθαι (ΕΚΠΟΝΕΙΣΘΑΙ) means literally "work through to the finish" but often has the sense of "practice, train" in an athletic context, as well as "earn through hard work."


pAgaliotis

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I would like to have this sentence in ancient greek tattooed,

Επανέρχομαι με τη δική σας ασπίδα - ή την Επιτροπή

"Come back with your shield - or on it"

Thanks!
« Last Edit: 04 Jan, 2011, 14:24:57 by wings »


Vasilis

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ἢ τὰν ἢ ἐπὶ τᾶς

    Ē\ tā\n ē\ epì tâs
    "Either [with] it [your shield], or on it"
    Meaning "either you will win the battle, or you will die and then be carried back home on your shield".
    It was said by Spartan mothers to their sons before they went out to battle to remind them of their bravery and duty to Sparta and Greece. A hoplite could not escape the field of battle unless he tossed away the heavy and cumbersome shield. Therefore losing one's shield meant desertion. (Plutarch, Moralia, 241)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_phrases
Πλούσιος άνθρωπος είναι ο άνθρωπος που αξίζει πολλά και όχι ο άνθρωπος που έχει πολλά. (Κ. Μαρξ)


 

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