Author Topic: Tattoos and Ancient Greek  (Read 1060163 times)

wings

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koskat1010

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2401 on: 05 Jan, 2011, 07:36:41 »
Hey, I'm a new member, I'd like someone to help me, I need a translation to ancient Greek, "from the ashes, I rise".  thanks alot,  euxaristw polu...

billberg23

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2402 on: 05 Jan, 2011, 08:06:07 »
"from the ashes, I rise".
See https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.2010 (replies #2017 and #2018).
P.S.  Please, no multiple posting of the same question in different threads.
« Last Edit: 05 Jan, 2011, 14:28:43 by billberg23 »
Τί δέ τις; Τί δ' οὔ τις; Σκιᾶς ὄναρ ἄνθρωπος. — Πίνδαρος


Nihongo

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Hope remained  and did not fly outside -> Ἐλπὶς ἔνδον ἔμιμνε οὐδὲ θύραζε ἐξέπτη

Hi, I'd like to have the phrase "hope is not lost" translated into ancient greek for a tattoo I'm getting soon.

I found this post https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=45566.0 a little bit back but I don't think it's quite the translation I'd like.

Can you also provide a phonetic pronunciation of the phrase?

You have my undying gratitude
« Last Edit: 17 Feb, 2011, 17:46:37 by spiros »

billberg23

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2404 on: 12 Jan, 2011, 03:26:52 »
"hope is not lost"
Hesiod was the ancient Greek poet (contemporary with Homer) who dealt with hope not being lost, in his Works and Days 96-98.  It seems that after Pandora, the first woman, had opened her jar, all the evil in the world flew out, and only hope remained:
ἀλλὰ γυνὴ χείρεσσι πίθου μέγα πῶμ᾽ ἀφελοῦσα 
ἐσκέδασ᾽, ἀνθρώποισι δ᾽ ἐμήσατο κήδεα λυγρά.
μούνη δ᾽ αὐτόθι Ἐλπὶς ἐν ἀρρήκτοισι δόμοισιν
ἔνδον ἔμιμνε πίθου ὑπὸ χείλεσιν οὐδὲ θύραζε
ἐξέπτη· 

But the woman took the great lid off the jar
and scattered them, with mournful results for humans.
Only hope remained there in an unbreakable home
inside the jar, below its rim, and did not fly outside.


For your purposes, we can extract the Greek that means "Hope remained  and did not fly outside":
Ἐλπὶς ἔνδον ἔμιμνε οὐδὲ θύραζε ἐξέπτη

Or you may simply want ἐλπὶς μίμνει (hope remains).


Nihongo

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hope remains eternal -> αἰεὶ μίμνει ἡ ἐλπίς
« Reply #2405 on: 12 Jan, 2011, 07:38:46 »
hope remains eternal -> αἰεὶ μίμνει ἡ ἐλπίς


Or you may simply want ἐλπὶς μίμνει (hope remains).


I think this last part most closely matches what I'm looking for. I'd like to add the word eternal to the phrase so that it would read:

"hope remains eternal"  or  "eternally, hope remains"  either is fine

I'd also request that it be in all caps as I believe it will show better on a tattoo.
Thanks for such a fast response.
« Last Edit: 17 Feb, 2011, 17:45:44 by spiros »


billberg23

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2406 on: 12 Jan, 2011, 08:08:57 »
"hope remains eternal"
Konnichiwa!
αἰεὶ μίμνει ἡ ἐλπίς                             ΑΙΕΙ ΜΙΜΝΕΙ Η ΕΛΠΙΣ
Pronunciation:  eh-ee meem-nee ee el-peess
« Last Edit: 12 Jan, 2011, 17:49:40 by billberg23 »

mavrodon

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2407 on: 12 Jan, 2011, 10:13:50 »
Quote
Pandora, the first woman, had opened her jar, all the evil in the world flew out

Is it coincidence that in those great civilizations, the Greek and the Jewish, phalocratic man used women, the best side of humanity, as scapegoats, to put the blame on them for all mankind's troubles?
« Last Edit: 12 Jan, 2011, 15:27:09 by mavrodon »

billberg23

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2408 on: 12 Jan, 2011, 16:57:00 »
Is it coincidence that in those great civilizations, the Greek and the Jewish, phalocratic man used women, the best side of humanity, as scapegoats, to put the blame on them for all mankind's troubles?
First fully discussed, I believe, in I. Trencsényi-Waldapfel, "The Pandora Myth," Acta ethnographica Academiae scientiarum Hungaricae 4 (1955) 107-122.  Cf. also F. Dornseiff, Antike und alter Orient (Leipzig 1959) 213-14, and Froma I. Zeitlin in Pandora: Frauen im klassischen Griechenland, ed. Ellen D. Reeder (Baltimore/Basel 1996) 52.  There are of course those like M. Astour, Hellenosemitica (Leiden 1967), who believe in common Near Eastern origins for both myths, and even for both cultures.
« Last Edit: 12 Jan, 2011, 18:58:19 by billberg23 »

vbd.

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2409 on: 12 Jan, 2011, 20:11:34 »
Recently and prominently, M. L. West, "The East Face of Helicon: West Asiatic Elements in Greek Poetry and Myth" (1997), addresses such questions. Also see A. S. Brown, "Aphrodite and the Pandora Complex", The Classical Quarterly 47 (1997), 26-47; S. T. Lachs, "The Pandora-Eve Motif in Rabbinic Literature", The Harvard Theological Review 67.3 (1974), 341-5; J. Glenn, "Pandora and Eve: Sex as the Root of All Evil", The Classical World 71 (1977), 179-85.
At last, I have peace.

mavrodon

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2410 on: 12 Jan, 2011, 21:58:18 »
Interesting references. Thank you. I hope I can access some of these and learn and ponder. In modern Greece there is a vulgar saying about the power women exert on men (about what is the power that can draw a ship) which, probably, is a vestige of the classical myth about women' s role.

billberg23

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2411 on: 13 Jan, 2011, 00:12:00 »
In modern Greece there is a vulgar saying about the power women exert on men (about what is the power that can draw a ship) which, probably, is a vestige of the classical myth about women' s role.
See P. Walcot, Greek Peasants, Ancient and Modern (New York 1970) 21-24, 45-46, 57-67, 82-85.
« Last Edit: 13 Jan, 2011, 03:33:46 by billberg23 »

surfingthegreek

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Truth, order, perseverance
« Reply #2412 on: 24 Jan, 2011, 09:57:45 »
I really appreciate what you guys do here! I decided on a tattoo and have been agonizing over the language for sometime but I've spent some weeks lurking your fine boards here and I think I'm definitely turned onto Ancient Greek. It would seem that most folks want the lower case letters but I'm particularly partial to all capitals...my understanding is that Ancient Greek was only written in capitals, no? Anyway, when I say truth I mean honesty, with order I mean personal organization and the opposite of chaos (NOT a sect, club etc) and by perseverance I mean achieving stuff despite difficulties. If it matters, these words will be alone and not written together or in a sentence. My objective is to get the correct word for the job and of course spelling. Heres what I've got so far...

TRUTH = ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ

ORDER = ΔΙΑΤΑΓΗ

PERSEVERANCE = ΕΜΜΟΝΗ or KAPTEPIA

Also I'm open to ideas because the only word I'm totally set on is 'truth' if anyone can think of anything that is structurally beautiful in font PLEASE do share! I'm feeling pretty blind here and would love to hear ideas from someone thats familiar with the Greek alphabet and words. I'm pretty open and although I hate to admit it the aesthetic value of the second and third words is as equal to me as the definition. Thanks for any assistance in advance :)

billberg23

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Re: Truth, order, perseverance
« Reply #2413 on: 24 Jan, 2011, 18:43:51 »
TRUTH = ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ
ORDER = ΔΙΑΤΑΓΗ
PERSEVERANCE = ΕΜΜΟΝΗ or KAPTEPIA
You're fine with "truth."  For "order," avoid ΔΙΑΤΑΓΗ, which tends to mean "command."  The idea of orderliness was summed up in the word ΚΟΣΜΟΣ, which has many typically Greek implications: see https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=13978.0.  There's also ΤΑΞΙΣ, which mostly means "arrangement" and probably won't suit your purpose.  Finally, for "perseverance," KAPTEPIA is your best bet, since ΕΜΜΟΝΗ tends to mean only "continuance."   

spiros

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Re: Tattoos and Ancient Greek
« Reply #2414 on: 16 Feb, 2011, 00:45:55 »
As this thread has grown out of all proportion, you are kindly requested to start a new topic, even if it is for a tattoo, on the English -> Ancient Greek Translation Forum (click on Start new topic and make sure you enter the phrase you want translated—and only that phrase— on the Subject field). This will make it easier to handle as well as follow topics.
« Last Edit: 16 Feb, 2011, 11:21:17 by spiros »