Tattoos and Ancient Greek

Guest · 2415 · 1129841

Aethanyc

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 5
Ah, thanks very much for the quick reply! You think a similar quotation is more likely to be in "Apology" than any of the other Socratic dialogues? Considering there was much discussion of courage at the trial?


billberg23

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6054
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.
You think a similar quotation is more likely to be in "Apology" than any of the other Socratic dialogues? Considering there was much discussion of courage at the trial?
It's a good bet!



Wildguy

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 1
hello, I was wondering if you could translate a phrase for me:

"we are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit."

Thank you.


billberg23

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6054
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.


TreyAEKDB

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 1
Hey guys I am sure you get tired of all the tattoo requests, but could you translate this for me?

If you have to crawl to live, stand and die

Please and thank you!



amymon87

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 2
Hi,

I was hoping to have "To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield" translated into ancient greek for a tattoo im hoping to get. Really appreciate any help.

Thank you


billberg23

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6054
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.
I was hoping to have "To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield" translated into ancient greek for a tattoo im hoping to get.
I'm really loth to force this famous last line of Tennyson's Ulysses into a dead language, for it deserves to remain in its original tongue.  I will, however, give you ancient Greek equivalents for the component parts:
To strive:  σπουδάζεσθαι
To seek:  ζητεῖν
To find:  εὑρεῖν
Not to yield:  μὴ ἐνδοῦναι


spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 813998
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
Have a look here:

ἀγωνίζεσθαι, ἐπιζητεῖν, εὑρίσκειν καί μή εἴκειν
https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=23145.0


xRAVENx

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 2
    • Gender:Male
I have a couple tattoo ideas I am working on, and I am wondering what the translations for two separate phrases are.

-"My heart beats with great devotion"

and

-"Be my strength, my voice, be my glory, set me free"

Much thanks to anyone who can help me!!


mavrodon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6585
    • Gender:Male
I have a couple tattoo ideas I am working on, and I am wondering what the translations for two separate phrases are.

-"My heart beats with great devotion"

and

-"Be my strength, my voice, be my glory, set me free"

Much thanks to anyone who can help me!!

In modern Greek "My heart beats with great devotion" = "Η καρδιά μου κτυπά με μεγάλη αφοσίωση", "Be my strength, my voice, be my glory, set me free" = "Γίνε η δύναμή μου, η φωνή μου, γίνε η δόξα μου, άσε με ελεύθερο". The last part may be also translated as either "άφησέ με ελεύθερο" or "απελευθέρωσέ με".
The second sentence, if spoken or written by a female, changes to "Γίνε.... ...ελεύθερη". (ελεύθερος=male, ελεύθερη=female).
For ancient Greek I am almost ignorant. Billberg23 is the top expert!~




billberg23

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6054
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.
Since xRavenx didn't ask for ancient Greek, I'm sure he'll be more than happy with your reply, mavrodon!  Anyhow, it couldn't possibly sound better in ancient Greek.  (-:
« Last Edit: 25 Feb, 2009, 16:31:37 by billberg23 »


xRAVENx

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 2
    • Gender:Male
I am quite happy with the modern Greek translation, much thanks mavrodon :)


sniperone

  • Semi-Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 6
Hello all,

I am looking for some help in translating some Alexander the Great Quotations.

I have done previous searches on the site and hope that my question is a little different to the results already posted. I hope I'm not repeating the same old stuff here, if so I'm sorry in advance.

The quotes are:

"Upon the conduct of each depends the fate of all"

and

"There is nothing that cannot be seized by them who have the courage"
or
"Anything can be seized by him who has the courage" (if the other is too difficult to translate)

I would like these translated into Ancient Greek Capitals. I realsie that the 2nd quote has been done alot before. The reason I ask again is because I have seen several translations that are slightly different, such as:
"Nothing is impossible to those who dare", "Nothing is impossible to him who will try", "Anything can be seized by those who dare".

I'm not sure if I am being too specific and that some of the words when translated have several meanings (like dare and courage), but I am trying to find the meanings of the two initial quotes if at all possible.

All help will be greatly welcomed.

I have heard that LITHOS is a good font for it to be printed in. If anyone has this font could they please type the translation in that font and post it here.

Thank you.


billberg23

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 6054
    • Gender:Male
  • Words ail me.
"Upon the conduct of each depends the fate of all"
and "There is nothing that cannot be seized by them who have the courage"
For the first quotation, see https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.1485 (Reply # 1499).
For the second, we don't need to "translate it into" ancient Greek because the actual words exist in an ancient Greek text attributed to Plutarch.  See, for example, https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=309.705 (Reply #710).

Someone will soon provide help with the font.


 

Search Tools