corp. -> corporis

Offline socratisv

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I am looking for the right word (corpora? corporem?) Any ideas are welcome:)
The hole sentence is:
Eique titulum MuDr. ad normam legis  xxx/1981 par.20, 3/c corp. tribuimus :
And (The University) granted the title of General Medicine Doctor (Mdur.) according to (the provisions of) par.20, 3/c of Law xxx/1981 ???
« Last Edit: 30 Nov, 2008, 10:21:46 by socratisv »
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Online billberg23

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Oops, there is no corporem, since corpus is neuter.  So it would be either corpus or, conceivably, corporis (genitive singular).  (Obviously, we need someone with some knowledge of legal terminology.)



Offline socratisv

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Oops, there is no corporem, since corpus is neuter.  So it would be either corpus or, conceivably, corporis (genitive singular).  (Obviously, we need someone with some knowledge of legal terminology.)
Thank you for your corrections; it is a neutral in deed (shame on me:-));
As for the legal expert, you've got him, despite he is not very familiar with latin (it's been a very long period since I graduated from school:-)).
Generally speaking, a Corpus is a collection, a body of legal texts (eg: The Codex Iustinianus/Ιουστινιανός κώδικας was the Corpus Juris Civilis). In this particular context, it has the sense of a Law, an Act (a body containing multiple provisions). In some English pages, I came accross the expression xxx/1981 Coll. on Higher Education Institutions, but I think that "collection"is a bad choice. What they meant to say in my text is Law, Act or posssibly "legal framework".
Anyway, given that the simpliest is the better, I opted for Law in my translation.
However, I don't know the case used here (genetive? other?)
« Last Edit: 30 Nov, 2008, 07:58:27 by socratisv »
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Offline vbd.

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Corporis appears to be correct.

Unless I'm terribly mistaken, "ei" (in eique) can either be singular dat. or plural masc. nom. So it can either mean "to/for him/her/it" or "they". And since the university is awarding the title, and they're using "tribuimus", which is 1st person, it seems unlikely that they would refer to the university as "they". Therefore "ei" seems to mean "to him".
At last, I have peace.



Offline socratisv

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Corporis appears to be correct.

Unless I'm terribly mistaken, "ei" (in eique) can either be singular dat. or plural masc. nom. So it can either mean "to/for him/her/it" or "they". And since the university is awarding the title, and they're using "tribuimus", which is 1st person, it seems unlikely that they would refer to the university as "they". Therefore "ei" seems to mean "to him".
Thank you for your confirmation for corporis:-)
Our Doctor here is a Lady, so "to her"seems to be ok.
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Offline vbd.

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Thank you for your confirmation for corporis:-)
Our Doctor here is a Lady, so "to her"seems to be ok.

It does; I wanted to make sure you have noticed this since in your initial translation there was no "him" nor "her".

Also, according to context, "tribuimus" could be "grant" (present) and not "granted" (perfect). If the text you're translating is the certificate of the Doctor title, then it probably is in present tense.
At last, I have peace.


Offline socratisv

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The three main sentences are:
- Medicinae universae doctorem constituimus ac declaramus (The University has decided and also awarded the)
- Titulum tribuimus (The University has granted to her the title of ...)
- Sigiilo munivimus et nomina nostra subscripsimus (we have affixed our signature and adorned with the seal)

Yes, the present could be used as well; I simply followed a British degree, which has been used as a pattern
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