Author Topic: ἐάν μή διδάξητε περί ἀρετὴς τούς τό ἀργύριον κλέψαντας, οὐ ταξόμεθα οἱ ὁπλῖται -> if you don't teach those who have stolen money a lesson on moral virtue, we, the hoplites, will not line up  (Read 1202 times)

Jorsay

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 38
My son and I are confused on the apodasis of this sentence.  It seems to us to have two subjects: we and hoplites.  Please help.

So far we have this translation: "If you don't teach those men who are stealing money about excellence, the hoplites (or we) will not arrange themselves.

Thanks,
« Last Edit: 16 Jan, 2009, 14:00:08 by spiros »


vbd.

  • Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 718
  • Gender: Male
Hello,

the speaker in this case are the hoplites. "if you don't teach those who have stolen money a lesson on moral virtue, we, the hoplites, will not line up" (or "will not take orders", if you don't take this too literally).
« Last Edit: 16 Jan, 2009, 03:09:11 by iTech »
At last, I have peace.

Jorsay

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 38
Thank you.

I have not seen this construction.  Would we say that "Hoplites" is in apositive position then?  Will this be true whenever I have a nomitive and an implied subject through the verb?



vbd.

  • Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 718
  • Gender: Male
Yes, there's an implied "ἡμεῖς" here. Self-evident things are often omitted in Greek. As soon as the author used "ταξόμεθα" it was absolutely clear that the subject is "we", in Greek "ἡμεῖς". "οἱ ὁπλῖται" then is in appositive position to "ἡμεῖς". Saying that "ταξόμεθα" is the verb and "οἱ ὁπλῖται" the subject is correct (and simpler) as well.

The nominative will not always be in appositive position, no.