Author Topic: εξανθηματική νόσος -> exanthematous disease, eruptive disease  (Read 7662 times)

banned8

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I think it has not been made clear enough that we do not say "poxed disease". Poxed is "εξανθηματικός" in other collocations.

I think it is adequate to say "eruptive disease" or "eruptive skin disease".


elena petelos

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I think it has not been made clear enough that we do not say "poxed disease". Poxed is "εξανθηματικός" in other collocations.



:))

(Διευκρινίζω τo "poxed" το ανέφερα για το "εξανθηματικός" γενικότερα. Δεν θα έλεγα "poxed disease".)



:))
Συμφωνώ κι επαυξάνω. btw: Δεν ξέρω αν eruptive or blistering καλύτερο, δεν έχω πρόταση en grec.
:)


banned8

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Δεν ξέρω αν eruptive or blistering καλύτερο, δεν έχω πρόταση en grec.

Εγώ πάλι προτείνω να κρατήσουμε το blistering για το collocation με το idiots. :-}

Ερώτηση: Δεν πάει προς τις φλυκταινώδεις δερματοπάθειες το blistering;



elena petelos

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Εγώ πάλι προτείνω να κρατήσουμε το blistering για το collocation με το idiots. :-}

Ερώτηση: Δεν πάει προς τις φλυκταινώδεις δερματοπάθειες το blistering;


To collocation είναι μια χαρούλα:
blistering diseases

Για το κείμενο της Μarian, θα ήθελα πρόταση.

(Αλλά να σου δώσω ένα παραδειγματάκι (πριν εξέλθω της οικίας) να δεις και εσύ τον προβληματισμό....)
:))

H agria (φλυκταινώδες εξάνθημα).

p. ag´ria   a severe, chronic pruriginous dermatosis characterized chiefly by hard excoriated prurigo papules and lichenification. Called also p. ferox.

Kαλό απόγευμα. ;-)

banned8

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Αυτό είδα κι εγώ: πολλές blistering diseases, ελάχιστες "φλυκταινώδεις" ή "φλυκταινώδης" και αναρωτήθηκα. Ωστόσο, εγώ καλύπτομαι (γλωσσικά) από το eruptive (erupt, εξανθώ) και θα έμενα μακριά από φλυκταινώδη και κνησμώδη.

elena petelos

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Αυτό είδα κι εγώ: πολλές blistering diseases, ελάχιστες "φλυκταινώδεις" ή "φλυκταινώδης" και αναρωτήθηκα. Ωστόσο, εγώ καλύπτομαι (γλωσσικά) από το eruptive (erupt, εξανθώ) και θα έμενα μακριά από φλυκταινώδη και κνησμώδη.
:)) Υπάρχουν φλυκταινώδη, φλυκταινοειδή, αλλά και φλυκταινογόνα.
Bye....


marian m

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The entire sentence is unnecessary because it ends with this phrase

«με μία πολύ βαριά εξανθηματική νόσο»

and then, the rest of the passage explains that the skin will break out into painful, harmful, incurable, recurring, and malignant-like ulcers (or boils).
 
I've decided not to use "eruptive (poxed) disease." In this case, I think it would be best to leave it as:

"eruptive disease"

FYI: This is in reference to Αποκάλυψη ισ’ 2 here in Greek and English, specifically, « . . εγένετο έλκος κακόν και πονηρόν . . .»
« Last Edit: 20 Aug, 2006, 03:49:52 by nickel »

elena petelos

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FYI: This is in reference to Αποκάλυψη ισ’ 2 here in Greek and English, specifically, « . . εγένετο έλκος κακόν και πονηρόν . . .»

(Once again, there's no such thing as "poxed disease". I think both Nick and I have elaborated on "poxed" -sufficiently.)
In terms of 16:2 in Rev.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&rls=GEUA%2CGEUA%3A2005-51%2CGEUA%3Aen&q=Revelation+16%3A2+boils&meta=

Similarly for sores.

boil = δοθιήνας

boil + δοθιήνας
Blisters = Bullae
...and
blistering disease + bullae equals...
>18,000 hits. So, to be honest with you, for me it's... blistering, here.
:))
« Last Edit: 20 Aug, 2006, 05:19:40 by elena petelos »

marian m

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Elena, the links were very helpful!

(Yes, both of you made it clear that there was no poxed disease. ;-)

(BTW, I'm reluctant to use "blister" b/c IMO it doesn't seem to harmonize with scriptural language.:-)


elena petelos

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Elena, the links were very helpful!

(Yes, both of you made it clear that there was no poxed disease. ;-)

(BTW, I'm reluctant to use "blister" b/c IMO it doesn't seem to harmonize with scriptural language.:-)


Pleasure! D(w)elving into scriptural language is not my thing, so time to go.
:)




exodus 9:9 + blistering

exodus + blisters + shekel

Word Differences
Another thing to keep in mind is the fact that the 1611 AD King James English is somewhat different than today's English language. The meaning of certain words has changed, and/or the King James sometimes uses words not familiar to most people today in their common speech. In addition, certain idioms in the original Hebrew and Greek are a little difficult to understand today. The Oxford Wide Margin KJV has excellent marginal references which often explain the correct meanings. Here is a partial listing of changed word meanings:

King James Phrase (on top)
Modern English (on bottom)
 
[...]
blains
"blisters", as in Exodus 9:9.


BoL with you work and have a lovely Sunday!

(As for "negaim", which is interesting (for me):
http://www.answers.com/topic/negaim

Negaim
Negaim (נגעים, literally "Blemishes") is the third tractate of the order of Tohorot in the Mishnah. It consists of fourteen chapters. Negaim describes the various forms of tzaraath, a leprosy-like disease described in the Bible (Leviticus 13-14), which affected people, clothing, and homes. The tractate describes the different types of blemishes symptomatic of the disease, and the various rituals involved in purifying someone who has been affected by it.

There is no Gemara for Negaim in either the Babylonian or Jerusalem Talmud.
Hebrew     שחין (boils, eruption), כנמת (lousiness, pediculosis, phtiriasis, vermination), קרעת, קרבת (eczema).

Boils (9:8 - 9:12) שחין
The sixth plague of Egypt was Shkhin (sh'chin). The Shkhin was a kind of skin disease, usually translated as "boils". God commanded Moses and Aaron to each take two handfuls of soot from a furnace, which Moses scattered skyward in Pharaoh's presence. The soot induced festering Shkhin eruptions on Egyptian men and livestock. The Egyptian sorcerers were afflicted along with everyone else, and were unable to heal themselves, much less the rest of Egypt.

 
http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/scabies
Whereas... (----only---- for ground... eruptions. :))

1216
 batseq
baw-tsake'
 a primitive root; perhaps
 http://www.sacrednamebible.com/kjvstrongs/STRHEB12.htm

(Deuteronomy 1
Nehemiah 1)




« Last Edit: 20 Aug, 2006, 15:27:42 by elena petelos »

marian m

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Elena, I really appreciated those links. :-) Thanks!