living for one purpose -> πρὸς ἕνα βλέποντα σκοπὸν ζῆν

DJN15

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I am wanting to get a tattoo in Ancient (Biblical) Greek that says "living for one purpose" or "one life - one purpose". These are the translations I have found for it but I want to make sure they are right, if they are not please provide the correct translation. Thank you very much!

living for one purpose: "ζῆν πρὸς ἑνὰς σκοπόν" or "ζῆν πρὸς μόνος σκοπόν"
one life, one purpose: "ἡ μία ζωή, ὁ εἷς σκοπός"
« Last Edit: 25 Mar, 2015, 06:16:56 by billberg23 »


billberg23

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The translations you found are rather garbled and ungrammatical.  Using the language of Plato, Gorgias 507d6, I would suggest
πρὸς ἕνα βλέποντα σκοπὸν ζῆν
— "to live looking toward (aiming at) one purpose."   



DJN15

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Oh really? A guy who has studied Biblical Greek told me that those were good translations. Is that in the Greek that the New Testament was written in? Is there a way to say "living for one purpose" in a shorter way? I know that might sound stupid, but the place I am getting the tattoo the other phrase fit just right. Also what would it look like if it was in all caps? Wasn't the New Testament written in all caps? Thank you so much I really really appreciate it. I really want to make sure the translation is good before I get it inked on forever.


billberg23

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Your "translations" show wrong case endings, wrong idioms, wrong words.  "Biblical Greek" courses, especially in bible schools & seminaries, tend to be taught by people who don't know very much ancient Greek.  What you call "Biblical Greek" actually covers a wide range of styles, from near-classical (e.g. Luke) to Hebraicized dialect (e.g. Septuagint, John the Evangelist).  So the Greek based on Plato (good conversational Greek from the classical period) would have been perfectly intelligible to anyone with a decent education in the "Biblical" period.
Upper case:
ΠΡΟΣ ΕΝΑ ΒΛΕΠΟΝΤΑ ΣΚΟΠΟΝ ΖΗΝ
As for saying it "in a shorter way," please realize that the English idiom and the Greek idiom are very different.  You can't simply transpose one language into the other word for word.  When you talk about living "for" a purpose in ancient Greek, you need to say, with Plato, "looking toward";  it won't make sense otherwise.



DJN15

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Okay thank you so much! I can tell you are super knowledgeable on the subject thanks for taking the time to explain it to me!


 

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