cut to the chase -> μπες στο ψητό, μπες στο θέμα, μπαίνω στο ψητό, μπαίνω στο θέμα, κατευθείαν στο ψητό, συντομεύω, συντόμευε, κόψε τις περιστροφές, άσε τις εισαγωγές

spiros · 4 · 19318

spiros

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cut to the chase -> μπες στο ψητό, μπες στο θέμα, μπαίνω στο ψητό, μπαίνω στο θέμα, κατευθείαν στο ψητό

"Cut to the chase" is a saying that means to get to the point without wasting time.
The phrase originated from early silent films. It was a favorite of and thought to have been coined by Hal Roach Sr (January 14, 1892 – November 2, 1992). Films, particularly comedies, often climaxed in chase scenes to add to film time. Some inexperienced screenwriter or director, unsure how to get to the climax or the lack of script to meet time requirements, would just make an abrupt transition, known as a cut.
An earlier version of the phrase (recorded 1880-1940) was Cut to Hecuba. This refers to the practice of shortening matinée performances of Hamlet by cutting the long speeches before the reference to Hecuba in Act II, Scene ii.[1]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cut_to_the_chase

To get to the point; to get on with it; to state something directly.
We don't have much time here. Could you cut to the chase?
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cut_to_the_chase
« Last Edit: 27 Dec, 2012, 11:25:15 by spiros »


spiros

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This phrase originated in the US film industry. Many early silent films ended in chase sequences preceded by obligatory romantic storylines. The first reference to it dates back to that era, just after the first 'talkie' - The Jazz Singer, 1927. It is a script direction from Joseph Patrick McEvoy's novel Hollywood Girl, 1929:

"Jannings escapes... Cut to chase."
http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/cut-to-the-chase.html






 

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