Author Topic: οὔθ' ὁ χρῡσὸς μένει οὔθ' ὁ ἄργυρος, ἀλλά μενεῖ ἥ γε δόξα τῶν εὐγενῶν τῶν τοῖς ποιηταῖς δεδιδαγμένων τὰ ἀγαθῶν ἀνδρῶν ἔργα.  (Read 827 times)

jmorsay

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I think this means "Neither gold nor silver is remaining but the bileif of the noble men who have been taught by the poets the deeds of good men."

 Is "τὰ ἀγαθῶν ἀνδρῶν ἔργα." what the poets were teaching the noble men?

Is this right?

thank you
« Last Edit: 13 May, 2009, 21:20:42 by billberg23 »


vbd.

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Hey,

it's "ὁ ἄργυρος" and "δεδιδαγμένων".

Is "τὰ ἀγαθῶν ἀνδρῶν ἔργα." what the poets were teaching the noble men?

Yes, you got that right.

μένει = remains
You should really use present simple as opposed to present continuous here: it's a general statement. You could even translate as "Neither gold nor silver are forever" (paraphrasing the famous "diamonds are forever").

I'd also translate "γε" as "of course" in this case. But you don't really have to do that.

μενεῖ is future!


EDIT: Oh, and δόξα here means "glory", not "belief".

« Last Edit: 13 May, 2009, 20:32:16 by vbd. »
At last, I have peace.

jmorsay

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Is it "Niether gold nor silver forever but the glory of the noble men who have been taught by the poet the deeds of the good men will remain forever."


Thanks


billberg23

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Τί δέ τις; Τί δ' οὔ τις; Σκιᾶς ὄναρ ἄνθρωπος. — Πίνδαρος