The Rough Guide To Ancient Greece by Edward -> Σύντομος οδηγός της Αρχαίας Ελλάδας υπό Έντουαρντ

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Offline James

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I'd be grateful if someone could tell me how to write in Greek (with the name Edward transliterated):
"The Rough Guide To
Ancient Greece
by Edward"
I'd appreciate it if line breaks were used where I put them.
« Last Edit: 05 Mar, 2007, 21:17:16 by wings »




Offline NadiaF

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I think it could be translated as "Πρόχειρος Οδηγός της Αρχαίας Ελλάδας του Έντουαρντ".

But I would suggest you wait for Nickel or Wings to confirm it or to suggest another translation.
Μην κοιμάσαι, είναι επικίνδυνο. Μην ξυπνήσεις, θα το μετανοιώσεις!
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Offline inertia

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ή από τον Έντουαρντ (γιατί φανταστείτε να λέγανε Περικλή το συγγραφέα)
Nobody puts Baby in a corner!



Offline banned8

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Bit of a problem here. I haven't heard of a Greek translation of the name of the well-known series, probably because Greek equivalents do not automatically come to mind, nor do they sound equally appealing. So, what are we talking about here? Is this going to be another title in the series? Or the title of an independent work? Probably just the title of a web page.

If a Greek publisher were to come out with Greek translations of the Rough Guide series, I suppose he would keep the English name of the series or go for something different but equally appealing in Greek. If you do insist on a Greek translation for the complete title here, we would probably have to suggest something that is not exactly the same and let you choose on the basis of back translations.

For the time being, my only contribution is my suggestion to go for something like "υπό Έντουαρντ" for "by Edward" (even "υπό Εδουάρδου"). Sounds a bit more formal and goes well with the "Ancient Greece" part of the title.


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Offline James

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Thanks for all the helpful feedback, it's not for anything too important, so I think a translation of "Rough Guide" to Greek words with a similar meaning would be just fine.


Offline banned8

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The Rough Guide To   
Ancient Greece
by Edward
Σύντομος οδηγός
της Αρχαίας Ελλάδας
υπό Έντουαρντ

I've used a word that means "brief" for "rough". Also, my "υπό Έντουαρντ" rather than "του Έντουαρντ" or "από τον Έντουαρντ" is, as I said before, formal and in line with the theme.

BTW, when can we see this rough guide? We're all agog now.


Offline James

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One last small point, is the word "της" the equivalent of the word "to"? Because you put it on the same line as Αρχαίας Ελλάδας so it would appear not.
But anyway thanks a whole bunch, you guys are all really great! Though I'm sorry for the anticlimax, but I don't think there'll be a rough guide worth reading coming out of all this.


Offline banned8

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Still, it's a good idea. But I'm afraid it's only the Rough Guide people who can exploit it.

Re: της. It's the article, in the genitive. In Greek, we say Brief Guide / of Ancient Greece. "Της" stands for "of (the)". And it should be in the second line.


Offline James

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Yeah, I bet the Rough Guide people could make a lot from doing historical Rough Guides! I'm suprised no one's thought of it before, actually.
Anyway, thanks again!


Offline elena petelos

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suprised no one's thought of it before, actually.


Actually... that's not (quite) true... :-)) Pausanias did (and so did Habicht).

A Greek who lived in Asia Minor during the second century A.D., Pausanias traveled through Greece and wrote an invaluable description of its classical sites that is a treasure trove of information on archaeology, religion, history, and art. Although ignored during his own time, Pausanias is increasingly important in ours--to historians, tourists, and archaeologists. Christian Habicht offers a wide-ranging study of Pausanias' work and personality. He investigates his background, chronology, and methods, and also discusses Pausanias' value as a guide for modern scholars and travellers, his attitude toward the Roman world he lived in, and his reception among critics in modern times. A new preface summarizes the most recent scholarship.


http://rex.ucpress.edu/books/pages/2964.html

Obviously, not a rough guide, but still...
:-)


 

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