Author Topic: τὸ κακὸν δοκεῖν ποτ᾽ ἐσθλὸν τῷδ᾽ ἔμμεν' ὅτῳ φρένας θεὸς ἄγει πρὸς ἄταν -> evil appears as good to him whose mind the god is leading to destruction (Sophocles, Antigone 622f.)  (Read 75 times)

billberg23

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τὸ κακὸν δοκεῖν ποτ᾽ ἐσθλὸν τῷδ᾽ ἔμμεν' ὅτῳ φρένας θεὸς ἄγει πρὸς ἄταν -> evil appears as good to him whose mind the god leads to destruction (Sophocles, Antigone 622f.).  See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whom_the_gods_would_destroy.  Sophocles is a possible source for Publilius Syrus' famous maxim, stultum facit fortuna quem vult perdere (https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=468774.msg715116#msg715116) and later Latin adaptations of the maxim that sometimes substitute "gods" for "fortune."  Despite some efforts to attribute a similar statement to Euripides, there is no evidence for it in any of his works or extant fragments.  The modern Greek μωραίνει η τύχη όν βούλεται απολέσαι, adapted to resemble ancient Greek, probably reflects Syrus' Latin sententia
« Last Edit: 08 Nov, 2017, 15:15:23 by billberg23 »
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