Re: άκλητος μεν έγωγε μένοιμί κεν · ες δε καλεύντων θαρσήσας Μοίσαισι συν αμετέραισι

Il_Penseroso

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άκλητος μεν έγωγε μένοιμί κεν · ες δε καλεύντων
θαρσήσας Μοίσαισι συν αμετέραισιν ικοίμαν

Sir Arthur Quiller Couch closes his Preface to the Book of English Verse with this passage.  Can anyone translate and/or identify the source?     
« Last Edit: 15 Apr, 2008, 07:33:13 by billberg23 »




banned8

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This is tough. To my limited knowledge of Ancient Greek, this looks like the Aeolic dialect. Though I searched Sappho and Alcman (and then Alcaeus, Anacreon, Stesichorus, Ibycus, Simonides, Pindar and Bacchylides), I found zilch. Perseus is down for maintenance.

Some notes:
άκλητος = unbidden, unsummoned
έγωγε = I at least
μένοιμι -> μένω = remain
καλεύντων = καλούντων; = those who summon (?)
θαρσήσας = having taken courage, unafraid
Μοίσαισι = Muses
αμετέραισιν = women reapers (?)
ικοίμαν -> ικοίμην -> ικνεόμαι = go

So what does it mean? "I at least remain unsummoned; to those who call me I should go without fear, with the Muses and the reapers." Hardly. "Encouraged by the Muses?" Where do the reapers come in? Anyway, it's a start. For other readers of the thread, let me add what comes before this:

For the anthologist's is not quite the dilettante business for which it is too often and ignorantly derided. I say this, and immediately repent; since my wish is that the reader should in his own pleasure quite forget the editor's labour, which too has been pleasant: that, standing aside, I may believe this book has made the Muses' access easier when, in the right hour, they come to him to uplift or to console—

« Last Edit: 10 Sep, 2006, 22:50:23 by nickel »


billberg23

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"Uninvited, I'd stay at home, for my part;  but, taking heart from the invitation, I'd come, accompanied by our own Muses."  The "I" is presumably the English poet, ready to take his place among the "greats."

Sorry to be late on this, but, like Nikos, I was busy tracking down the source.  In vain, I fear.  The dialect is Doric (hence αμετέραισιν for ημετέραισιν), the mode bucolic, but I can't find it in Theocritus or in any of the standard bucolic poets.  Since he doesn't attribute it, I wonder if it isn't Couch's own composition.  In his day, weren't English schoolboys forced to compose Greek verse in various dialects?

Εσκαλεύντων (in tmesis), by the way, seems to be a genitive absolute.



banned8

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This is fantastic, Bill!

It is by Theocritus, after all, the sixteen idyll (16.106).

"when no man bids me, let me abide at home, but to the houses of such as bid me, boldly let me come with my Muses" is the translation given here.

Mind you, the last bit is: ίοιμ' αν in TLG, but this is what you get in http://www.mikrosapoplous.gr/theocritus/thcrts16.htm :

ἄκλητος μὲν ἔγωγε μένοιμί κεν, ἐς δὲ καλεύντων
θαρσήσας Μοίσαισι σὺν ἁμετέραισιν ἰοίμαν
« Last Edit: 11 Sep, 2006, 02:34:11 by nickel »


billberg23

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Nice catch, Nick!  Yes, ικοίμαν is an early emendation of the MSS ιοίμαν.  Wilamowitz also found ιοίμαν unacceptable, and changed it to ίοιμ' άν.
In translation, it doesn't make much difference;  the point is (throughout Id. 16) to beg for a bit of patronage.  Clever of Couch to give those two lines a new and different context.


 

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