Author Topic: Douglas Dunn, A Removal from Terry Street  (Read 5866 times)

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Douglas Dunn, A Removal from Terry Street
« on: 15 Oct, 2009, 22:32:04 »
A Removal from Terry Street
Douglas Dunn



On a squeaking cart, they push the usual stuff,
A mattress, bed ends, cups, carpets, chairs,
Four paperback westerns. Two whistling youths
In surplus U S Army battle-jackets
Remove their sister’s goods. Her husband
Follows, carrying on his shoulders the son
Whose mischief we are glad to see removed,
And pushing, of all things, a lawnmower.
There is no grass in Terry Street. The worms
Come up cracks in concrete yards in moonlight.
That man, I wish him well. I wish him grass.


Douglas Eaglesham Dunn, OBE (born October 23, 1942) is a Scottish poet, academic, and critic. He currently lives in Scotland.
Dunn was born in Inchinnan, Renfrewshire. He was educated at the Scottish School of Librarianship, and worked as a librarian before he started his studies in Hull. After graduating with a First Class Honours degree from the University of Hull, he worked in the Brynmor Jones Library under Philip Larkin. He was friendly with Larkin and admired his poetry, but did not share his political opinions.


See also
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/reviews/new-selected-poems-19642000-by-douglas-dunn-745567.html
« Last Edit: 15 Oct, 2009, 22:35:07 by spiros »