wisdom lies in clarity -> σοφόν τοι τὸ σαφές

Skyperch

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Hi,

I am doing a spot of research for a new tattoo I would like to get. I have found the Subjected quote by the Ancient Greek tragedian Euripides in his play Orestes, to be one that I wish to get. The quote itself is apparently paraphrased from "Wisdom is shown in clarity, not in obscurity."

I would like to get clarification on the "Wisdom Lies in Clarity" translation into Ancient Greek. I've done a bit of Dr Googling and come up with an answer that seems to be commonly reflected from multiple sources as being correct.

Σοφόν το σαφές

Could someone please verify for me that the translation is correct? The internet is such a wonderful resource, but unless you interact with a real person for verification, you can't be sure if what you read is true. Having the unparaphrased quote translated would also be greatly appreciated.

Additionally, I am curious as to the method as to how writing (not stone carving) was accomplished in Ancient Greece. Was is similar to the wax tablets that the Ancient Romans used? I ask as I would like to see what types of fonts it could be presented as.

I would be most grateful for any information in this regard.

Many thanks,

Skyperch.

« Last Edit: 28 Jul, 2020, 12:53:06 by spiros »


billberg23

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σοφόν τοι τὸ σαφές (Euripides, Orestes 397) -> rest assured, clarity is wisdom (literally, "there's no doubt, the clear is wise")
On ancient Greek writing materials, see What did the ancient Greeks write with?
Welcome to the Forum, Skyperch!  Unlike modern languages, ancient Greek has no "machine translators" on the Internet.  But we're always here for you!
« Last Edit: 28 Jul, 2020, 18:02:07 by billberg23 »



spiros

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Skyperch

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Thank you very much, spiros and billberg23. I appreciate the input.

The article "What did the ancient Greeks write with?" was pretty interesting. Doubly so to note that word for the papyrus sheets joined by gum to make a roll (biblos) seems to be related to the words Bible and Book.

I've never actually explored Wiktnary before But after exploring the link, I think I may now have to have a deeper look.

Again, thank you.



 

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