Author Topic: -ρα (suffix)  (Read 3021 times)

chimera

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-ρα (suffix)
« on: 05 Oct, 2006, 03:50:08 »
The Galatian fort Ankyra, and Chimera,  have the /-ra/ suffix. Is this a Greek form, or borrowed from Celtic?
Celt /-ra/ means "towards" , and /-rath/ is "fortified mound". How would you translate /ancyra/ and /chimaira/ ("winter"  "-ra") ?
chimera
« Last Edit: 18 Apr, 2008, 06:09:58 by billberg23 »


Katerina Dimopoulou

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Re: suffix -ra
« Reply #1 on: 05 Oct, 2006, 08:05:20 »
The greek word chimaira (that is, properly written with -ai-) means a she-goat. A he-goat would be chimaros. Now, the analysis would be

*chimar-ja > chimair-a (epenthesis and compensatory lengthening)

The actual suffix, that is, is -ja.

Unfortunately, I cannot find something interesting about the origin or etymology of the word.

billberg23

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Re: suffix -ra
« Reply #2 on: 05 Oct, 2006, 08:43:55 »
This may or may not be interesting:  M.C. Astour, Hellenosemitica (Leiden 1967) 264 suggests that the monster's name is derived from Hebrew hamar meaning "to foam" (as of wine, or the sea).  According to Astour, the Greeks misinterpreted the name and linked it with their word for "winter goat."
Τί δέ τις; Τί δ' οὔ τις; Σκιᾶς ὄναρ ἄνθρωπος. — Πίνδαρος


Katerina Dimopoulou

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Re: suffix -ra
« Reply #3 on: 05 Oct, 2006, 09:35:22 »
This is very interesting (no irony implied).

chimera

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Re: suffix -ra
« Reply #4 on: 06 Oct, 2006, 01:13:50 »
Eukaristia megales. Do you have a comment then on -ja ? It is said that gheim, chima "winter" is Skt. hima "winter (Himalaya "winter land") and "year-old animal". The high priest of Babylon chucked a goat into the Euphrates river each New Year to purify the river -and obviously the river got purer as the goat drifted away...
chimera