timeo Danaos et dona ferentes -> beware of Greeks bearing gifts | I fear the Greeks, even when they bring gifts

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Offline spiros

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Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes -> Beware of Greeks bearing gifts | I fear the Greeks, even when they bring gifts | I fear the Greeks, especially when they bring gifts

Danaos being a term for the Greeks. In Virgil's Aeneid, II, 49, the phrase is said by Laocoön when warning his fellow Trojans against accepting the Trojan Horse. The full original quote is quidquid id est timeo Danaos et dona ferentis, quidquid id est meaning whatever it is and ferentis being an archaic form of ferentes. Commonly mistranslated "Beware of Greeks bearing gifts".
« Last Edit: 10 Jan, 2016, 10:26:34 by spiros »


Offline oberonsghost

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Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes -> Βeware of Greeks bearing gifts

My dear Magistra...jumped down our throats when we rendered this phrase as "beware of Greeks bearing gifts".....she preferred..."I fear the Greeks, especially when they are bringing gifts"....

:)
Πουλιὰ τὸ βάρος τῆς καρδιᾶς μας ψυλὰ μηδενίζοντας καὶ πολὺ γαλάζιο ποὺ ἀγαπήσαμε!  (Ἐλύτης)



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Offline billberg23

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As all must know, this hexameter verse was written in the first century BCE by the greatest of Roman poets, Vergil (Aeneid 2.49).  The words are spoken by Laocoön, Trojan priest of Neptune, who attempts to warn his countrymen that the Greeks' "gift" (the wooden horse) will spell their doom if brought into the city.  He then flings a spear into the wooden effigy (to no effect), but is punished by the gods:  Laocoön and his two sons are strangled by sea-snakes while sacrificing — as portrayed in the famous small Hellenistic statue-group:



(The Romans believed that they themselves were descended from Trojan immigrants;  the Roman empire had therefore avenged the Greek victory at Troy.  The Romans were of course too short-sighted to realize that the Greeks were taking over and running the entire bureaucracy of the Roman empire.  So, at best, a Pyrrhic victory.)
Let this be a lesson to us all.  ((-:
« Last Edit: 09 Feb, 2010, 20:17:36 by billberg23 »



 

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