I love you -> σ' αγαπώ, σας αγαπώ

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JKC2b

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Can someone help me with this?  My fiance and I would like to have our wedding rings engraved with I love you Jeanie and the other with I love you Shawn  (We are getting married in Santorini, so we thought this would be cool!)

I have seen several different styles on the way this was written and they have come from people in Greece and from translation dictionaries on the Internet.  Can someone help me out?  I am a bit confused and I don't know what is the correct way it is written!!

Also, How is October 1, 2005 written in Greek?  (This is our wedding day!)

I am not sure I will be able to find a jeweler in NC who will be able to help me with the engraving, but I will give it a try!

Thanks much!
Jeanie

« Last Edit: 12 Oct, 2015, 12:56:20 by spiros »


banned8

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Here are my suggestions. Save the picture, print it out and take it to someone who can put it to good use. Congratulations! And make the best of it.



JKC2b

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Thank you, Nickel, for responding back to me!!!  This may be another silly question, but what style do they use in Greece today and is the most common?  Classical Greek, Modern Greek (upper case) or Modern Greek (lower case)?

Also, one of the employees at the resort we are staying at in Santorini told us "I love you" was written as:  O'aaaop     (I cannot for the life of me figure out how to put the appropriate symbols above every one the letters, so this isnt the exact way he wrote it, but can you make any sense of this?  If  O'aaaop  had the appropriate symbols above the word, would it say "I love you" too?  It just looks TOTALLY different than the way you wrote it!)

Thanks again! 
Jeanie


banned8

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Classical belongs to the distant past (and they had no lower-case characters in those days). We write modern Greek exactly as you write English, you know, upper case for banner headlines, that sort of thing. If you find the proper jeweller, go for lower case. And I can send you cursive script if your jeweller likes a challenge.

As for what looks like O'aaaop, I suppose I would read it exactly the way you would, and it sounds more like an enthusiastic shout in the middle of Greek dance than [saga'po] for "I love you" (that 'g' is pronounced almost like the 'y' in yard without the i sound between the y and the a).



JKC2b

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As for what looks like O'aaaop, I suppose I would read it exactly the way you would, and it sounds more like an enthusiastic shout in the middle of Greek dance than [saga'po] for "I love you" (that 'g' is pronounced almost like the 'y' in yard without the i sound between the y and the a).

Thanks again, Nickel!  I may just go with your translation of "I love you" and not the one the owner at the resort told us: Ó'áãáðþ. (Copy/paste works great!)  I just hope he does NOT ask us to see the engraving inside our rings and find out we did NOT use his translation!  I looked and looked all over the internet, and not one interpretation of "I love you" that matched what he told us.  Strange too, because I believe he is born and raised in Greece.  He also owns a resort that specializes in weddings.  Hmmmmm.......

He did tell us that in Greece, how they engrave rings is to have the future wife or husbands name written inside the band.  Is that a common Greek custom....do you know?  If so, I image we can put: Tzivi(Jeanie)  and Eov (Shawn).  (I am not sure how you transpose the letters to Greek Arial--or whatever the proper font should be!)  It sure would be shorter and less of a challange for a jeweler here in the USA!



banned8

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Your Greek friend told you exactly the same as I, though without a space after the apostrophe. You just have a font that does not give you Greek.

And yes, you can have Shawn inside your ring and Jeanie in his; it would be most appropriate and much more practical -- as long as you don't do the spelling.

And it doesn't have to be Arial, I can do it in other fonts, and cursive is the popular option here for rings.


Leon

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'Σ' ΑΓΑΠΩ JEANIE' and 'Σ' ΑΓΑΠΩ SHAWN' in upper case and 'σ' αγαπώ Jeanie' and 'σ αγαπώ Sean' in lowercase letters.

'Shawn' with Greek letters should be 'ΣΩΝ' (upper case) and 'Σων' (lower case); 'Jeanie' is 'ΤΖΗΝΗ' (upper case) and Τζήνη' in lower case.
«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά»
- Ρήγας Φερραίος


banned8

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Dear Leon,

I subscribe to a school that simplifies the spellings of foreign names. And this also happens to be the official way to do it. However, there are indeed people who, like you, would opt for spellings like Σων and Τζίνη or Τζήνη. To me, Τζήνη looks ugly, but I would have nothing against a hellenized Τζίνη. And I wouldn't mind Σων. But we would have to put the whole question of the history of the Greek language and the problems of transliteration to Shawn and Jeanie for them to choose which ones they like better. Are you prepared to explain these problems to them?


σα(ρε)μαλι

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Nickel, I am a contrarian, but you are provocative. You know that someone who hasn't been taught anything about long and short vowels and the polytonic system cannot provide an answer to your question.
I can live everywhere in the world, but it must be near an airport -and a pharmacy, I would add.

Δεν είναι ο ύπνος της λογικής που γεννάει τέρατα, αλλά ο άγρυπνος ορθολογισμός που πάσχει από αϋπνίες.


banned8

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I am provocative, but Leon isn't? He knows very well what he's talking about. But the story goes like this. A foreigner asks what their names would look like in Greek. I give an answer in what is not just a personal choice but also the official way names are transliterated in our days.

Now Leon comes along and puts forward his own preferences. And it is a valid point of view, upheld by many people who prefer to transliterate in the old way, according to long and short vowels. This creates a dilemma to the foreign askers. What should they do? It should be their choice, right? For them to make a valid choice they would need to know more things about the language than the average Greek person knows. So my invitation to Leon is to explain to Shawn and Jeanie what their options are and how to go about making a choice...


σα(ρε)μαλι

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 Needless to say that you never cease to astonish me Nickel. Your level of clarity is so high as  leaving no room for me to disagree, but then again why should I? I totally agree with you. May I ask if the new grammar deals with this matter in any way? I definately prefer the simplified versions. I strongly believe that we should make our lives easier whenever possible.
« Last Edit: 02 Jun, 2005, 22:50:56 by σα(ρε)μαλι »
I can live everywhere in the world, but it must be near an airport -and a pharmacy, I would add.

Δεν είναι ο ύπνος της λογικής που γεννάει τέρατα, αλλά ο άγρυπνος ορθολογισμός που πάσχει από αϋπνίες.


banned8

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The new grammar does indeed deal with this matter (or I would be making this up). It's interesting but it can get complicated and controversial, so if we are to talk about it, we should start a new thread in the monlingual forum.


JKC2b

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Again, thank you for all those who have replied!  I have really enjoyed this post and have already learned a few things!  I cannot even imagine learning the Greek language, so to me, you are all the experts! 

Jeanie





 

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