Ionian -> ιωνικός, ιόνιο, Ιόνιο

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primus diddy

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Ionian, Dorian, Aeolian, Phrygian, Lydian, Locrian -> ιωνικός, δωρικός, αιολικός, φρυγικός, λοκρικός

Hi, I'm a music student getting into the Ancient Greek modes and I was wondering if there is a meaning for them in English. I'll give an example: the Aeolian mode seems to have relation to the god Aolus, the God of Wind.  I would expect it to have a meaning associated with wind, or something like that. Or maybe a description of the Aeolian peoples.

Here they are:
Ionian
Dorian
Aeolian
Phrygian
Lydian
Mixolydian
Locrian

I hope I didn't do such a bad job explaining my question that no one knows what I'm asking!

Thanks
Mike

PS If you have any additional information please feel free to share!
« Last Edit: 16 Jun, 2018, 13:30:10 by wings »


spiros

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I recommend looking them up in wikipedia. For example:

Greek Lydian mode

The Lydian mode is named after the ancient kingdom of Lydia in Anatolia. In Greek music theory it was based on the Lydian tetrachord: a series of rising intervals of two whole tones followed by a semitone. Applied to a whole octave, the Lydian mode was built upon two Lydian tetrachords separated by a whole tone. This is identical to the modern major mode: C D E F | G A B C. Placing the two tetrachords together, and the single tone at bottom of the scale produces the Hypolydian mode (below Lydian): F | G A B C | (C) D E F. Placing the two tetrachords together, and the single tone at the top of the scale produces the Hyperlydian mode (above Lydian), which is effectively the same as the Hypophrygian mode: G A B C | (C) D E F | G. Confusingly, the Greek Lydian mode is the same as the mediaeval and modern Ionian mode or major mode.


Greek Dorian mode

The Dorian mode is named after the Dorian Greeks. In Greek music theory it was based on the Dorian tetrachord: a series of rising intervals of a semitone followed by two whole tones. Applied to a whole octave, the Dorian mode was built upon two Dorian tetrachords separated by a whole tone. This is the same as playing all the white notes of a piano from E to E: E F G A | B C D E. Placing the two tetrachords together, and the single tone at bottom of the scale produces the Hypodorian mode (below Dorian): A | B C D E | (E) F G A. Placing the two tetrachords together, and the single tone at the top of the scale produces the Hyperdorian mode (above Dorian), which is effectively the same as the Mixolydian mode: B C D E | (E) F G A | B. Confusingly, the Dorian mode is the same as the mediaeval and modern Phrygian mode.

Greek Phrygian mode

The Phrygian mode is named after the ancient kingdom of Phrygia in Anatolia. In Greek music theory it was based on the Phrygian tetrachord: a series of rising intervals of a whole tone, followed by a semitone, followed by a whole tone. Applied to a whole octave, the Phrygian mode was built upon two Phrygian tetrachords separated by a whole tone. This is the same as playing all the white notes on a piano keyboard from D to D: D E F G | A B C D. Placing the two tetrachords together, and the single tone at bottom of the scale produces the Hypophrygian mode (below Phrygian): G | A B C D | (D) E F G. Placing the two tetrachords together, and the single tone at the top of the scale produces the Hyperphrygian mode (above Phrygian), which is effectively the same as the Hypodorian mode: A B C D | (D) E F G | A. Confusingly, the Phrygian mode is the same as the mediaeval and modern Dorian mode.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lydian_mode
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_mode
« Last Edit: 06 Jun, 2005, 11:13:18 by spiros »




 

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