Author Topic: Benjamin Slate, Beowulf on Steorarume (Beowulf in Cyberspace)  (Read 2505 times)

elena petelos

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Beowulf (on Steorarume) by Benjamin Slate

The translation of Beowulf on this site is not the easiest introduction to the poem, and many may have difficulty reading it.  Each verse of the Old English is translated into a verse in modern English.  This means that there is a direct correspondence between the Old English text and the translation.  Unfortunately, it also makes the translation harder to read/understand than some of the other translations of Beowulf–though I have attempted to translate into idiomatic modern English. But the school student still may want to begin with a different translation.
   If you are reading Beowulf in class your teacher probably has already chosen a translation for you. But if not, the translation by Seamus Heaney is of course very wellknown already, and though it is not as literal of a translation as perhaps it should be, I think it may be a good introduction to the poem - but only as a first introduction.  Heaney is himself a poet, and so his translation is partially a translation of Beowulf, but also, in a sense, it is Heaney's own poem about Beowulf. More literal but still readable translations I would recommend are those of Howell D. Chickering, Jr., Louis Rodrigues and Roy Liuzza.
   For comparisons and more information on many different Beowulf translations, visit Syd Allan's alternate Beowulf translations site.

Areas of the site that may be most interesting to the school-student include:

* Introduction to Beowulf
        a concise introduction to Beowulf
* Beowulf Artwork
       artistic images relating to the story of Beowulf
* Beowulf Encyclopaedia
       short encyclopaedia detailing the treasures & weapons of Beowulf
* Beowulf - Read Aloud!
        excerpts of Beowulf in Old English [@ Syd Allan's site]

Grammar & High School Teachers:
See above.


University Instructors:
If you are teaching Beowulf in translation, or as part of course on history of English, etc. - see Undergraduates below.
If you are teaching Beowulf in original language, see Postgraduate below.


Undergraduates:
The 'bilingual' edition has extensive explanatory notes.
Also of interest are my two articles, one on dating and one on the origin/structure of Beowulf.
Also, a complete glossary for Beowulf is available.

Postgraduates & other Scholars:
The 'semi-diplomatic' edition contains extensive notes on the MS. and on the emendations & restorations I accept or reject.
The 'bilingual' edition has extensive explanatory notes.
Also of interest are my two articles, one on dating and one on the origin/structure of Beowulf.
Also, a complete glossary for Beowulf is available.


http://www.heorot.dk/beowulf-on-steorarume_front-page.html


Glossary
(e.g.: http://www.heorot.dk/gloss-en-e.html )

Translation and Old English

http://www.heorot.dk/beo-intro-rede.html


Illustration of Beowulf & Grendel by Lynd Ward, 1939
from the Heritage Press and Limited Editions Book Club editions of Beowulf
of the translation of William Ellery Leonard
« Last Edit: 07 Jan, 2007, 14:47:47 by wings »