Author Topic: τὸν πάνθ' ὁρῶντα καὐτὸν οὐχ ὁρώμενον -> the all-seeing though himself unseen  (Read 93 times)

spiros

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« Last Edit: 08 Sep, 2019, 10:38:51 by spiros »


billberg23

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Fr. 1129 Nauck.  Frequently quoted in antiquity and attributed to Euripides by Clement of Alexandria (Protrepticus 6.68.3.6).  Also in Philemon (4th cent. BCE), fr. 247 Kock (Comicorum Atticorum fragmenta), and could be originally by him.
Τί δέ τις; Τί δ' οὔ τις; Σκιᾶς ὄναρ ἄνθρωπος. — Πίνδαρος

spiros

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Thanks, Master. Looks like Christian theology found great inspiration in the Ancient Greeks.


billberg23

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Right, at least they were always ready to "convert" the words of the ancient authors.  The quotation could have referred originally to a scout or a spy, someone who could see it all from behind a tree or a door.  Extracted from its context, it fits beautifully into theology.
Τί δέ τις; Τί δ' οὔ τις; Σκιᾶς ὄναρ ἄνθρωπος. — Πίνδαρος