Modern Greek verbs page, ads and antispyware

joe · 15 · 13157

joe

  • Modern Greek Verbs
  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 69
Can you post a link to your site?


spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 812592
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
Whose site? It is a bit hard to understand who you are referring to.



joe

  • Modern Greek Verbs
  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 69
I thought diceman was referring to site html, his site. One of my hobbies is correcting character set translation errors. I do everything in utf-8, which should avoid such problems, provided, of course, you put the character set in a meta tag. If Adobe is correctly parsing the html it should also recognize the meta tags. You can see an example if you view one of the source pages in my dictionary http://modern-greek-verbs.tripod.com. I'm always forgetting the syntax.


banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 132
    • Gender:Male
SPYROS, IS THIS A SAFE LINK? IT TRIED TO DO THINGS TO MY COMPUTER. IF NOT, PLEASE REMOVE IT.



spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 812592
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
I thought diceman was referring to site html, his site. One of my hobbies is correcting character set translation errors. I do everything in utf-8, which should avoid such problems, provided, of course, you put the character set in a meta tag. If Adobe is correctly parsing the html it should also recognize the meta tags. You can see an example if you view one of the source pages in my dictionary http://modern-greek-verbs.tripod.com. I'm always forgetting the syntax.


The link to his site is in his signature below his post. If you had read my final answer to his problem (in Greek) you would have seen that I mentioned the encoding problem. UTF is great, but for Greek Windows-1253 and ISO 8859-7 are equally valid with some minor problems. See ISO 8859-7 vs. windows-1253

Nick, what exactly did the link do to your computer? All I can see in the code is some tripod ad js

Code: [Select]
<!-- START: Catman header -->

<script type="text/javascript">
var cm_role = "live"
var cm_host = "tripod.lycos.com"
var cm_taxid = "/memberembedded"
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://scripts.lycos.com/catman/init.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript1.1">
var objAdMgr = new AdManager();
objAdMgr.setForcedParam("keyword", "greekverbs+cf+ce+b+ce+b+ce+b+ce+af+ce+bd+cf");

if(adChannel != "") { objAdMgr.setForcedParam("google_ad_channel", adChannel); }
var strProdSetName = objAdMgr.chooseProductSet(); objAdMgr.renderHeader();
</script>

<!-- END: Catman header -->

<script type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript1.1">
window.onload = function () {
    setKeywordCookie('greekverbs+cf+ce+b+ce+b+ce+b+ce+af+ce+bd+cf');
    if (displayAd()) {
        showAd('FooterAd_826063');
    }
    buildExitHandler();
}
if (!displayAd()) document.write("<!" + "--");
</script>
« Last Edit: 16 Jul, 2005, 13:26:01 by spiros »


banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 132
    • Gender:Male
I'm not sure I can reproduce it. I probably pressed on a no-no link somewhere on his page, but at least two of the programs I use for my protection reacted badly.


spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 812592
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
What I think it does is display an ad when you leave or something but I have so many pop up killers and ad protection programs that nothing happens to me.

Code: [Select]
buildExitHandler();
}
if (!displayAd()) document.write("<!" + "--");


banned8

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 132
    • Gender:Male
Yes, I too am so well protected that I didn't really care. I'm worried about the average user, who soon finds his computer slowing down because so many cookies and so much spyware try to run his system for him.


joe

  • Modern Greek Verbs
  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 69
I thought diceman was referring to site html, his site. One of my hobbies is correcting character set translation errors. I do everything in utf-8, which should avoid such problems, provided, of course, you put the character set in a meta tag. If Adobe is correctly parsing the html it should also recognize the meta tags. You can see an example if you view one of the source pages in my dictionary http://modern-greek-verbs.tripod.com. I'm always forgetting the syntax.


The link to his site is in his signature below his post. If you had read my final answer to his problem (in Greek) you would have seen that I mentioned the encoding problem. UTF is great, but for Greek Windows-1253 and ISO 8859-7 are equally valid with some minor problems. See ISO 8859-7 vs. windows-1253

Sorry Spiros,

Wrong Answer!

http://www.metafrasi.edu.gr/ looks fine to me. The charset is:
<meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-7">

It links to http://www.metafrasi.edu.gr/home_gr/courses_gr/trnstudies_gr/trnstudies_gr.html
which uses utf-8:
<meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8">

The problem is that this html is way too complex... That's the problem with all these html page generators: they produce unreadable code, and alot of stuff you don't need.

I would recommend starting with canonical html (including the charset=utf-8 metatag), annotating it by hand with markup, then running it through these formatting programs... one step at a time. Then you can see where it breaks. There's no other way to do it. The site builder could be producing incorrect, or at least, inconsistant html, and the conversion programs could be buggy. It's been known to happen.

On character sets:

1) Windows-1253 is broken in several places, and Microsoft has been known to make changes which do maintain compatablity with previous versions...

2) ISO 8859-7 is obsolete.

There is no valid justification for mixing character sets like this. UTF-8 is the right choice, no ifs-ands-or-butts.

Joe

"Final Answer?"

Reminds me of Regis Philbin on "Who wants to be a Millionaire?"
:)


joe

  • Modern Greek Verbs
  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 69
Yes, I too am so well protected that I didn't really care. I'm worried about the average user, who soon finds his computer slowing down because so many cookies and so much spyware try to run his system for him.

Nickel,

Well protected?

Your protection software is clogging your system. Remove it. This tripod site is clean, better than most, because they do not feature pop-ads. I access it all the time from public Internet terminals and it works fine. There is no spyware. And they give you CGI in perl, for free!

Joe


spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 812592
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
The problem was not in http://www.metafrasi.edu.gr but in a newsletter page which was not online. Please read carefully previous posts. And yes, 99,999% of Greek sites run fine without UTF-8!


joe

  • Modern Greek Verbs
  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 69
Careful!

All these 8859-7 sites will break when they try mixing French or German or, Heaven forbid, Russian with Greek.

The solutions are all ad-hoc, and ugly.

Joe

PS

Thanks for the link. I misread your post. I thought you said the site was in his signature block.


spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 812592
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
Yes, you are absolutely right. Usually all you get in Greek sites is English & Greek so there is no problem.


What If ...?

  • Jr. Member
  • **
    • Posts: 211
Όλα είναι κόπος, αλλά η δακτυλογράφηση από την αρχή, είναι ένας σχετικά ευχάριστος κόπος. Ξεμάθαμε το πληκρτολόγιο του PC από τις άλλες συσκευές, και ...
« Last Edit: 21 Jul, 2005, 17:42:58 by Ηλίας »


joe

  • Modern Greek Verbs
  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 69
Όλα είναι κόπος, αλλά η δακτυλογράφηση από την αρχή, είναι ένας σχετικά ευχάριστος κόπος. Ξεμάθαμε το πληκρτολόγιο του pc από τις άλλες συσκευές, και ...

Ηλίας,

Thanks for the encouragement...

My Greek friends usually cut and paste the output of these site builder programs, like Frontpage, to reduce the text they produce, which they universally judge to be excessive...

I was thinking, if diceman could reduce the complexity of the output generated by his site builder using this technique, he could pass a simplified document into the pdf creator; he might be able to isolate the problem.

On Tripod:

My friends like the advertising on http://modern-greek-verbs.tripod.com. The ads seem to add credibility. They ask me, "How did you do that?"

I say, "I didn't."

(My next book will be "Modern Greek Nouns". There are 13 classes of nouns, times 3 genders, which yields 39 different declinations, too many for a mere mortal to remember. The ultimate goal is to create a mechanical brain capable of translating greek/english and vice versa. I'll need to convert these sites to XML first.)

Tripod scans my html for keywords so it can produce context-sensitive banner advertising. Some of the ads even promote, "Learn Greek the Easy Way." They might even put a link to the translatum site, if you advertised with them.

There is no spyware, rest assured.

Yes, I could pay Tripod $4.95 to get rid off the adds, but I like it this way, for the time being, anyway.

I haven't seen one for a while, so I forgot to mention it... Occasionaly tripod will create a pop up the first time you visit the site (if they have the advertising, I guess. Popups are usually very expensive, more expensive than embedded advertising.)

Careful! Don't close it, just minimize it.

I'm willing to bet the Tripod JS creates a cookie when it creates the popup, and removes the cookie, when you close the window. If you delete the cookie by closing the popup, you'll get the same popup the next page you visit, so just leave it in the task bar.

Personally, I'm also annoyed by those sites which throw up popups every time you click on the page, especially when you try closing the window, like on the porno sites... :)

If it's any encouragement to anyone out there, I removed my "protection" software years ago.

I have never been infected.

Also, I have never been willing to pay my ISP extra for pop-up blockers. You see, popups can be useful, especially for Print Preview...

But if you visit a site which uses a popup for advertising (like hotmail) you'd be better off not using that site, than using a popup blocker. Try Yahoo, or Gmail (anybody want an invitation?)

As for antivirus, these programs do absolutely nothing, beyond giving you a warm, fuzzy feeling. They make their money by playing on the fear of the masses. It's shameless self-promotion. The browser is, by nature, a very poor attack vector. Languages like Java and JS simply do not allow any client-side file or network IO.

Only Microsoft products seem to create problems -- primarily because it has a predominate position in the marketplace -- especially those "Active-X" components, which are small, binary load modules. These components have access to the entire API, the "Application Programming Interface", so they can do anything on your machine you can do.

It is never a good idea to accept an Active-X componet from the web, and the browser should warn you if a page wants one.

Another problem is Visual Basic, because it too has almost complete access to your computer's IO subsystem. VB is the hacker's language of choice. Most attacks are written in VB and hidden in email attachments. Open the attachment, and the VB runs, potentially corrupting your entire file system.

Incidently, in a properly designed OS, damage to your pc should be confined to your desktop. Windows 98 was not a serious OS in any sense of the word. Rogue programs could install themselves anywhere, even in system directories.

Windows XP, on the other hand, uses the NT file system which is "access controlled", so any virus you might download as a normal user could, at worst, delete your files, and annoy your friend with unwanted email.

1) Never browse the web as a supervisor. Use your personal account, or better yet, create a simple account, with an empty desktop, especially is you are going to visit risky sites.

2) Never visit hacker sites, blogs, or bulletin-boards. Unless you know what you're looking for.

I still see Windows 98 machines out there, infected with spyware, which popup unwanted messages at frequent intervals. We even have them here, at the University of the Aegean... You needed protection software to compensate for the shoddy design of Windows 98.

Windows XP should present virtually no problem, because of its NT (non-FAT) file system.

As I said, I removed all my protection software years ago, even on an old Windows 98 pc. The machine booted 10 times faster, because there were no splash screens for MacAffee or Norton, and no download time for "updates".

My browser ran better, because the protection got in the way of the normal mode of operation.

Joe

PS

Which brings up the question of DOS, Denial-of-Service. Such attacks usually rely on the cooperation of hundreds, if not thousands, of unwitting participants, and are almost always launched from trojan horses hidden in Microsoft email, first, because Microsoft is the most popular OS, and secondly, because of Visual Basic.

A one-on-one DOS doesn't make sense: 1) it monopolizes the attacker's machine and 2) It comes from a single IP address, which is easily blocked.


 

Search Tools