William Shakespeare -> Ουίλιαμ Σαίξπηρ, Γουίλιαμ Σαίξπηρ, Ουίλιαμ Σέξπιρ, Γουίλιαμ Σέξπιρ, Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ, Γουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ, Γουλιέλμος Σαιξπήρος

spiros · 23 · 546

Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
William Shakespeare -> Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ, Γουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ, Ουίλιαμ Σαίξπηρ, Γουίλιαμ Σαίξπηρ



William Shakespeare (bapt. 26 April 1564 – 23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's greatest dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon" (or simply "the Bard"). His extant works, including collaborations, consist of some 39 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.

Ιn 1593 and 1594, when the theatres were closed because of plague, Shakespeare published two narrative poems on sexual themes, Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece. He dedicated them to Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton. In Venus and Adonis, an innocent Adonis rejects the sexual advances of Venus; while in The Rape of Lucrece, the virtuous wife Lucrece is raped by the lustful Tarquin. Influenced by Ovid's Metamorphoses, the poems show the guilt and moral confusion that result from uncontrolled lust. Both proved popular and were often reprinted during Shakespeare's lifetime. A third narrative poem, A Lover's Complaint, in which a young woman laments her seduction by a persuasive suitor, was printed in the first edition of the Sonnets in 1609. Most scholars now accept that Shakespeare wrote A Lover's Complaint. Critics consider that its fine qualities are marred by leaden effects. The Phoenix and the Turtle, printed in Robert Chester's 1601 Love's Martyr, mourns the deaths of the legendary phoenix and his lover, the faithful turtle dove. In 1599, two early drafts of sonnets 138 and 144 appeared in The Passionate Pilgrim, published under Shakespeare's name but without his permission.

Published in 1609, the Sonnets were the last of Shakespeare's non-dramatic works to be printed. Scholars are not certain when each of the 154 sonnets was composed, but evidence suggests that Shakespeare wrote sonnets throughout his career for a private readership. Even before the two unauthorised sonnets appeared in The Passionate Pilgrim in 1599, Francis Meres had referred in 1598 to Shakespeare's "sugred Sonnets among his private friends". Few analysts believe that the published collection follows Shakespeare's intended sequence. He seems to have planned two contrasting series: one about uncontrollable lust for a married woman of dark complexion (the "dark lady"), and one about conflicted love for a fair young man (the "fair youth"). It remains unclear if these figures represent real individuals, or if the authorial "I" who addresses them represents Shakespeare himself, though Wordsworth believed that with the sonnets "Shakespeare unlocked his heart".

The 1609 edition was dedicated to a "Mr. W.H.", credited as "the only begetter" of the poems. It is not known whether this was written by Shakespeare himself or by the publisher, Thomas Thorpe, whose initials appear at the foot of the dedication page; nor is it known who Mr. W.H. was, despite numerous theories, or whether Shakespeare even authorised the publication. Critics praise the Sonnets as a profound meditation on the nature of love, sexual passion, procreation, death, and time.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Shakespeare

Μια από τις περιφημότερες συλλογές σονέτων είναι η συλλογή των εκατόν πενήντα τεσσάρων σονέτων του Σαίξπηρ, που τυπώθηκε το 1609. Ο απαισιόδοξος τόνος τους εκφράζει αισθήματα που περιγράφονται με αντικειμενικότερο τρόπο στον Άμλετ και στις μεταγενέστερες τραγωδίες του συγγραφέα αποκαλύπτοντας έναν Σαίξπηρ αρκετά διαφορετικό από τον επιτυχή άνθρωπο του θεάτρου, ο οποίος αναδύεται μέσα από τις σωζόμενες βιογραφικές του μαρτυρίες. Μοτίβα κοινότοπα, από εκείνα που αφθονούν στους πολυάριθμους Ευρωπαίους λυρικούς ποιητές της εποχής (οι οποίοι εμπνέονται, άμεσα ή έμμεσα, από την ερωτική ποίηση του Πετράρκα), υπάρχουν στα σαιξπηρικά σονέτα. Τα περισσότερα όμως από αυτά διακρίνονται από τα ερωτικά ποιήματα της εποχής χάρη στη διαύγεια της έκφρασης και στο βάθος και την ένταση της βιωμένης εμπειρίας, την οποία αναπαράγουν με τέτοιο τρόπο, ώστε τα σονέτα να θεωρούνται κυρίως τα ποιήματα εκείνα με τα οποία ο Σαίξπηρ αποτυπώνει τα προσωπικότερα αισθήματά του. Έτσι, στο παραπάνω σονέτο το συνηθισμένο μοτίβο της αθανασίας, που εξασφαλίζει σ’ ένα πρόσωπο η απεικόνιση του σ’ ένα ποίημα, δεν ενοχλεί καθόλου, καθώς η φρεσκάδα και η λεπτότητα του συναισθήματος διαποτίζουν όλη την έκταση των στίχων.
http://digitalschool.minedu.gov.gr/modules/ebook/show.php/DSGL-B125/626/4036,18094/

Poems with Greek (and other language) translations
Sonnet 1 (From fairest creatures we desire increase)
Sonnet 2 (When forty winters shall besiege thy brow)
Sonnet 8 (Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?)
Sonnet 18 (Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?)
Sonnet 23 (As an unperfect actor on the stage)
Sonnet 24 (Mine eye hath played the painter and hath steeled)
Sonnet 29 (When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes)
Sonnet 30 (When to the sessions of sweet silent thought I summon up remembrance of things past)
Sonnet 53 (What is your substance, whereof are you made)
Sonnet 66 (Tired with all these, for restful death I cry)
Sonnet 67 ([Ah! wherefore with infection should he live)
Sonnet 76 (Why is my verse so barren of new pride)
Sonnet 77 (Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear)
Sonnet 94 (They that have power to hurt and will do none)
Sonnet 95 (How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame)
Sonnet 96 (Some say thy fault is youth, some wantonness)
Sonnet 97 (How like a winter hath my absence been)
Sonnet 100 (Where art thou Muse that thou forget'st so long)
Sonnet 101 (O truant Muse what shall be thy amends)
Sonnet 102 (My love is strengthened, though more weak in seeming)
Sonnet 103 (Alack! what poverty my Muse brings forth)
Sonnet 104 (To me, fair friend, you never can be old)
Sonnet 105 (Let not my love be called idolatry)
Sonnet 106 (When in the chronicle of wasted time)
Sonnet 107 (Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul)
Sonnet 108 (What's in the brain that ink may character)
Sonnet 109 (O! never say that I was false of heart)
Sonnet 110 (Alas! 'tis true, I have gone here and there)
Sonnet 111 (O! for my sake do you with Fortune chide)
Sonnet 112 (Your love and pity doth the impression fill)
Sonnet 113 (Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind)
Sonnet 114 (Or whether doth my mind, being crowned with you)
Sonnet 115 (Those lines that I before have writ do lie)
Sonnet 116 (Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments)
Sonnet 117 (Accuse me thus: that I have scanted all)
Sonnet 118 (Like as, to make our appetites more keen)
Sonnet 119 (What potions have I drunk of Siren tears)
Sonnet 120 (That you were once unkind befriends me now)
Sonnet 121 ('Tis better to be vile than vile esteemed)
Sonnet 122 (Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain)
Sonnet 123 (No, Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change)
Sonnet 130 (My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun)
Sonnet 131 (Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art)
Sonnet 146 (Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth)
Sonnet 147 (My love is as a fever, longing still)

Reviews/Translation Introductions
Μεταφράζοντας τα σονέτα του Σαίξπηρ (Δημήτρης Καψάλης)
Το σαιξπηρικό σονέτο και η μεταφραστική του πρόσληψη στον ελληνικό χώρο (Μαντώ Πανοπούλου)
Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ, Τα Σονέτα, εισαγωγή-μετάφραση: Λένια Ζαφειροπούλου, εκδόσεις, Gutenberg, δίγλωσση έκδοση
Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ: Εργασία στα πλαίσια του μαθήματος επιλογής (Πρότυπο Πειραματικό Λύκειο Ευαγγελικής Σχολής Σμύρνης)


Bibliography
— Τα περίφημα σονέτα του Σαίξπηρ ρυθμικά μεταφρασμένα, μτφ. Μανώλης Μαγκάκης, Αθήναι, 1911.
— Σονέτα William Shakespeare, μτφ. Βασίλης Ρώτας, Βούλα Δαμιανάκου, Επικαιρότητα, 1975 (Διαβάστε την Εισαγωγή)
— Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ. Σονέτα, Επιμ.- εισαγ.- μτφ. Στυλιανός Αλεξίου, Στιγμή, Αθήνα, 1998.
— Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ. 25 σονέτα, μτφ. Καψάλης Διονύσης, Άγρα, 1998.
— Καψάλης, Διονύσης, Τα μέτρα και τα σταθμά. Δοκίμια για τη λυρική ποίηση, Άγρα, 1998.
— Spiller, Michael R.G., The development of the sonnet. An introduction, London and New York.
— Vendler, Helen, The art of Shakespeare sonnets, Harvard University Press, London, 1999.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 11:45:37 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Πρώτες γραμμές από το: Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ, Τα Σονέτα, εισαγωγή-μετάφραση: Λένια Ζαφειροπούλου, εκδόσεις, Gutenberg, δίγλωσση έκδοση

1From fairest creatures we desire increaseΑπ' τα ωραία πλάσματα ζητούμε απογόνους
2When forty winters shall besiege thy browΌταν το φρύδι σου άπειροι θα πολιορκούν χειμώνες
3Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewestΔες στο γυαλί την όψη σου και σίγουρα θα νιώσεις
4Unthrifty loveliness, why dost thou spendΓλύκα μου άσωτη, γιατί στον εαυτό σου τώρα
5Those hours, that with gentle work did frameΑυτές οι ώρες που με αβρό εργόχειρο έχουν χτίσει
6Then let not winter's ragged hand defaceΓι' αυτό ας μη σβήσει το τραχύ το χέρι του χειμώνα
7Lo, in the orient when the gracious lightΔες, μόλις στην ανατολή το άγιο φως υψώσει
8Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?Εσύ είσαι μουσική – κι ακούς τη μουσική με λύπη;
9Is it for fear to wet a widow's eyeΦοβάσαι ίσως της χήρας σου το μάτι μη δακρύσει
10For shame deny that thou bear'st love to anyΝτροπή που δεν τ' ομολογείς: δεν αγαπάς κανένα
11As fast as thou shalt wane, so fast thou grow'stΌσο γοργά θα μοιραστείς, τόσο θα μεγαλώσεις
12When I do count the clock that tells the timeΌταν με το ρολόι μετρώ τις ώρες κι όταν βλέπω
13O that you were yourself? but, love, you areΩ, ο εαυτός σου νά 'σουνα! Δεν είσαι αγάπη μου όμως
14Not from the stars do I my judgement pluckΔεν δρέπω απ' τους αστερισμούς την κρίση μου εγώ
15When I consider every thing that growsΌταν το συλλογίζομαι πως όλα μεγαλώνουν
16But wherefore do not you a mightier wayΑλλά γιατί δεν μάχεσαι με μέσα πιο ισχυρά
17Who will believe my verse in time to comeΠοιος στους καιρούς που είναι να 'ρθουν θα πίστευε μια ρίμα
18Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?Να σε συγκρίνω με μια μέρα του καλοκαιριού;
19Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion's pawsΠαμφάγε Χρόνε, αχρήστευσε του λιονταριού τα πόδια
20A woman's face with nature's own hand paintedΜε το ίδιο της το χέρι η Φύση σου 'χει ζωγραφίσει
21So is it not with me as with that MuseΔεν είμαι σαν τη Μούσα εγώ που γράφει κεντρισμένη
22My glass shall not persuade me I am oldΔεν θα με πείσει το γυαλί πως είμαι γέρος, όσο
23As an unperfect actor on the stageΣαν ατελής ηθοποιός που επάνω στην σκηνή
24Mine eye hath played the painter and hath stelledΤο μάτι μου εικόνισε, παίζοντας τον ζωγράφο
25Let those who are in favour with their starsΌσοι τά 'χουν καλά με τ' άστρα ας ζούνε κι ας καυχιούνται
26Lord of my love, to whom in vassalageʼρχοντα της αγάπης μου, η τόση σου αξία
27Weary with toil, I haste me to my bedΤρέχω για το κρεβάτι μου· ο κόπος με τσακίζει
28How can I then return in happy plightΠώς θα επιστρέψω στις χαρές που ο βίος μου υποσχόταν
29When in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyesΌταν η Τύχη κι οι άνθρωποι με μίσος με κοιτούνε
30When to the sessions of sweet silent thoughtΌταν μες στα συνέδρια της σιωπηλής μου σκέψης
31Thy bosom is endeared with all heartsΤο στήθος σου ακριβοστολίζουν όλες οι καρδιές
32If thou survive my well-contented dayΑν ζεις μετά τη μέρα που τα χρέη μου θα ξοφλήσει
33Full many a glorious morning have I seenΠολλές είδα ένδοξες αυγές με κολακεία στα μάτια
34Why didst thou promise such a beauteous dayΓιατί μου υποσχέθηκες μια μέρα τόσο ωραία
35No more be grieved at that which thou hast doneΠλέον για 'κείνο που έκανες μη νιώθεις άλλες τύψεις
36Let me confess that we two must be twainΑς το παραδεχτώ λοιπόν: πρέπει να ζούμε ως ξένοι
37As a decrepit father takes delightΌπως πατέρας γέρος πια κοιτάζει με ηδονή
38How can my Muse want subject to inventΠώς θα μπορούσε η Μούσα μου θέματα να εφευρίσκει
39O, how thy worth with manners may I singΩ! Πώς σεμνά τις αρετές σου εγώ να τραγουδήσω
40Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them allΠάρε όλες τις αγάπες μου αγάπη μου εσύ
41Those pretty wrongs that liberty commitsΗ ασυδοσία πράττει κάποια σφάλματα γλυκά
42That thou hast her, it is not all my griefΔεν θλίβομαι μόνο επειδή την έχεις εσύ τώρα
43When most I wink, then do mine eyes best seeΒλέπουν πολύ καλύτερα τα μάτια μου κλεισμένα
44If the dull substance of my flesh were thoughtΑν η ουσία η οκνή της σάρκας μου ήταν σκέψη
45The other two, slight air and purging fireΤα άλλα, φωτιά καθαρτική κι αέρας ελαφρός
46Mine eye and heart are at a mortal warΘανάσιμο έχουν πόλεμο το μάτι κι η καρδιά μου
47Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is tookΤο μάτι μου και η καρδιά κλείσανε συμμαχία
48How careful was I, when I took my wayΠόση έγνοια είχα εγώ πριν βγω στου ταξιδιού το δρόμο
49Against that time (if ever that time come)Για τη στιγμή ετοιμάζομαι (αν έρθει η μέρα εκείνη)
50How heavy do I journey on the wayΠόσο βαρύς ο δρόμος μου! Δήθεν επιθυμώ
51Thus can my love excuse the slow offenceΚι έτσι η αγάπη τη νωθρή αγένεια συγχωρεί
52So am I as the rich, whose blessed keyΕίμαι σαν πλούσιος που το ευλογημένο του κλειδί
53What is your substance, whereof are you madeΠοια είν' η ουσία σου; Από τι εισ' άραγε πλασμένος
54O how much more doth beauty beauteous seemΩ, πόσο αλήθεια η ομορφιά πιο όμορφη φαντάζει
55Not marble, nor the gilded monumentsΜάρμαρα θa πεθάνουνε κι eπίχρυσα μνημεία
56Sweet love, renew thy force. Be it not saidΔυνάμωσε έρωτα γλυκέ! Κανείς να μη σου πει
57Being your slave, what should I do but tendΤι άλλο να κάνω, ο δούλος σου, απ' το να διακονώ
58That god forbid, that made me first your slaveΜου απαγορεύει ο θεός που μ' έκανε δικό σου
59If there be nothing new, but that which isΑν νέο δεν είναι τίποτε, αν είν' παλιό ό,τι κάνω
60Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shoreΌπως στη χαλικόστρωτη ακτή το κύμα σπάζει
61Is it thy will thy image should keep openΘέλεις η εικόνα σου ανοιχτά πάντα να μου κρατάει
62Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eyeΤης φιλαυτίας τ' αμάρτημα το βλέμμα μου κυριεύει
63Against my love shall be as I am nowΚάποτε θά 'ναι η αγάπη μου όπως εγώ είμαι πλέον
64When I have seen by Time's fell hand defacedΣαν δω πως φθείρει το άσπλαχνο, το άγριο χέρι του Χρόνου
65Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless seaΑφού και γη και θάλασσα και πέτρα και χαλκό
66Tired with all these, for restful death I cryΚουράστηκα· το θάνατο να μ' αναπαύσει κράζω
67Ah, wherefore with infection should he liveΑχ, μες στη διαφθορά γιατί κι αυτός μαζί να ζει;
68Thus is his cheek the map of days outwornΚι είν' η θωριά του επιτομή των παλαιών καιρών
69Those parts of thee that the world's eye doth viewΣτην όψη σου που οι ματιές του κόσμου αντικρίζουν
70That thou art blamed shall not be thy defectΔεν φταις εσύ για όλη τούτη την κακολογία
71No longer mourn for me when I am deadΜη με θρηνήσεις άλλο πια όταν θα 'ρθει ο χαμός μου
72O, lest the world should task you to reciteΑλλιώς ο κόσμος θα σου πει κατάλογο να γράψεις
73That time of year thou mayst in me beholdΊσως να βλέπεις πως πολύ στην εποχή έχω μοιάσει
74But be contented when that fell arrestΝα χαίρεσαι άμα η φυλακή η άγρια που καμιά
75So are you to my thoughts as food to lifeΌ,τι είν' για τη ζωή η τροφή, εσύ είσαι για τις σκέψεις
76Why is my verse so barren of new prideΓιατί περήφανη στολή δεν έχει η ποίησή μου
77Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wearΑπ' τον καθρέφτη σου θα δεις πως οι ομορφιές σου φθίνουν
78So oft have I invoked thee for my MuseΕπικαλέστηκα συχνά ως Μούσα μου εσένα
79Whilst I alone did call upon thy aidΟσο την αρωγή σου εγώ επικαλούμουν μόνος
80O, how I faint when I of you do writeΠτοούμαι όσες φορές γράφω για σένα, ξέροντας
81Or I shall live your epitaph to makeΕίτε εγώ ζήσω για να πω τον επιτάφιό σου
82I grand thou wert not married to my MuseΤ' ομολογώ, τη Μούσα μου δεν είχες παντρευτεί
83I never saw that you did painting needΔεν είδα να χρειάζεσαι ψιμύθιο, γι' αυτό
84Who is it that says most, which can say moreΠοιος είναι ρήτωρ ισχυρός να πει πιο ισχυρό
85My tongue-tied Muse in manners holds her stillΗ φιμωμένη Μούσα μου μ' ευπρέπεια έχει σωπάσει
86Was it the proud full sail of his great verseΠερήφανα έχει αυτός πανιά και βέβαια έχει στρέψει
87Farewell, thou art too dear for my possessingΑντίο, είσαι πολύ ακριβός για με, τον κάτοχό σου
88When thou shalt be disposed to set me lightΌταν θα σου 'ρθει η όρεξη να πεις πως δεν αξίζω
89Say that thou didst forsake me for some faultΣκέψου πως μ' απαρνήθηκες για κάποιο ελάττωμά μου
90Then hate me when thou wilt, if ever, nowΓι' αυτό αν το θες να με μισήσεις, τώρα μίσησέ με
91Some glory in their birth, some in their skillΚάποιους δοξάζει η τέχνη τους και κάποιους η γενιά τους
92But do thy worst to steal thyself awayΜα κάνε το χειρότερο: κλέψε μου τον εαυτό σου
93So shall I live, supposing thou art trueΈτσι θα ζω σαν σύζυγος εγώ απατημένος
94They that have power to hurt and will do noneΑυτοί που να πληγώσουνε μπορούν και δεν πληγώνουν
95How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shameΠόσο γλυκό το όνειδος κάνεις που ζει εντός σου!
96Some say thy fault is youth, some wantonnessΚάποιοι ονομάζουν πταίσμα σου και νιότη και δονή
97How like a winter hath my absence beenΠόσο έμοιασ' η απουσία μου με βαρυχειμωνιά
98From you have I been absent in the springʼνοιξη έλειψα μακριά σου, τότε που φορούσε
99The forward violet thus did I chideΤη νέα βιολέτα μάλωσα: «Κλέφτρα γλυκιά, από ποιον
100Where art thou, Muse, that thou forget'st so longΠού είσαι Μούσα και ξεχνάς να πεις τόσον καιρό
101O truant Muse, what shall be thy amendsΠοιος, ω Μούσα φυγόπονη, θα σε ανταμείψει τότε
102My love is strengthened though more weak in seemingΗ αγάπη μου δυνάμωσε κι ας δείχνει αδυναμία
103Alack, what poverty my Muse brings forthΑλίμονο, η Μούσα μου πόση γεννά πενία
104To me, fair friend, you never can be oldΓια μένα φίλε ωραίε να γεράσεις δεν μπορείς
105Let not my love be called idolatryΑς μην κληθεί η αγάπη μου ποτέ ειδωλολατρία
106When in the chronicle of wasted timeΌταν μέσα σε χρονικά καιρών αφανισμένων
107Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soulΟι φόβοι μου ή η προφητική του κόσμου μας ψυχή
108What's in the brain that ink may characterΤι έχω στον νου που με μελάνι δύναμαι να γράψω
109O, never say that I was false of heartΩ, την καρδιά μου ψεύτικη μην πεις κι ας μοιάζει λίγο
110Alas 'tis true, I have gone here and thereΠλανήθηκα εδώ κι εκεί κι όλοι τους, αχ, τρελό
111O, for my sake do you with Fortune chideΓι' αυτό που είμαι, αχ, την Τύχη να κατηγορήσεις
112Your love and pity doth th' impression fillΗ αγάπη σου κι ο οίκτος σου καλύπτουν την ουλή
113Since I left you, mine eye is in my mindΑπό την ώρα που έφυγα, το μάτι μου στη σκέψη
114Or whether doth my mind, being crowned with youΜήπως ο νους μου άραγε πού 'χει κορόνα εσένα
115Those lines that I before have writ do lieΨεύδονται οι παλιοί στίχοι μου κι εκείνοι όπου είχα γράψει
116Let me not to the marriage of true mindsΤον γάμο των πιστών ψυχών αιτία μη μου δώσεις
117Accuse me thus, that I have scanted allΝαι, κατηγόρησέ με ορθώς, αμέλησα όλ' αυτά
118Like as to make our appetites more keenΑν θέλουμε πιο κοφτερή την όρεξη να κάνουμε
119What potions have I drunk of siren tearsΩ, τι πιοτά έχω πιει εγώ, τι δάκρυα από σειρήνες
120That you were once unkind befriends me nowΜ' ανακουφίζει που άλλοτε ήσουν κακός μαζί μου
121'Tis better to be vile than vile esteemedΠιο καλά νά 'σαι αισχρός, παρά αισχρό να σε νομίζουν
122Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brainΤο δώρο, το τετράδιό σου τό 'χω μες στον νου μου
123No! Time, thou shalt not boast that I do changeΧρόνε όχι! Δεν θα καυχηθείς ότι αλλάζω εγώ
124If my dear love were but the child of stateΑν κάποιας εύνοιας παιδί η αγάπη μου ήταν, ίσως
125Were 't aught to me I bore the canopyΘά 'ταν καλό βασιλικό κουβούκλιο να σηκώνω
126O thou my lovely boy, who in thy powerΩ εσύ, αγόρι μου γλυκό, που εξουσιάζεις τώρα
127In the old age black was not counted fairΠαλιά το μαύρο για όμορφο δεν το μετρούσε ο κόσμος
128How oft, when thou, my music, music play'stΣυχνά, η μουσική μου εσύ, μα μουσική όταν βγάζεις
129Th' expense of spirit in a waste of shameΜόνο σπατάλη της σποράς σ' ένα παιδοίο ντροπής
130My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sunΤα μάτια της αγάπης μου ωχριούν μπροστά στον ήλιο
131Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou artΤέτοια είσαι, κι όμως τύραννος· σαν κάποιες που τις κάνουν
132Thine eyes I love, and they, as pitying meΤα μάτια σου αγαπώ κι αυτά μοιάζουν να με λυπούνται
133Beshrew that heart that makes my heart to groanΜάλωσε αυτή σου την καρδιά που την καρδιά μου θλίβει
134So now I have confessed that he is thineΛοιπόν, να που ομολόγησα πως είναι πια δικός σου
135Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy WillΗ καθεμιά έχει το ποθώ. Εσύ έχεις το Θέλω
136If thy soul check thee that I come so nearΑν η ψυχή σε μέμφεται που ήρθα τόσο κοντά σου
137Thou blind fool love, what dost thou to mine eyes?Έρωτα εσύ τυφλέ τρελέ, στα μάτια μου τι κάνεις;
138When my love swears that she is made of truthΗ αγάπη μου μου ορκίζεται: «είμαι πλασμένη εγώ
139O call not me to justify the wrongΜη με καλείς να δώσω δίκιο στα δεινά τα τόσα
140Be wise as thou art cruel? do not pressΓίνε σοφή όσο και σκληρή: άλλο μη μου πιέσεις
141In faith I do not love thee with mine eyesΤα μάτια μου δεν σ' αγαπούν, τ' ορκίζομαι κυρά μου
142Love is my sin, and thy dear virtue hateΑγάπη είν' η αμαρτία μου κι η αρετή σου μίσος
143Lo, as a careful housewife runs to catchΔες: όπως μια νοικοκυρά γεμάτη έγνοιες τρέχει
144Two loves I have, of comfort and despairΔύο αγάπες έχω: μια χαρά και μιαν απελπισία
145Those lips that love's own hand did makeΤα χείλη αυτά που του Έρωτα το χέρι τά 'χει φτιάξει
146Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earthΚέντρο του αμαρτωλού πηλού μου εσύ, πτωχή ψυχή
147My love is as a fever, longing stillΗ αγάπη μου σαν πυρετός είναι που όλο ποθεί
148O me! What eyes hath love put in my headΤι μάτια ο έρωτας θεοί μου 'βαλε στο κεφάλι
149Canst thou, O cruel, say I love thee notΜπορείς, ω άσπλαχνη, να λες ότι δε σ' αγαπώ
150O, from what power hast thou this powerful mightΩ, ποια ισχύς σου έδωσε τέτοια εξουσία ισχυρή;
151Love is too young to know what conscience isΣυνείδηση ο έρωτας δεν ξέρει, είναι μωρό
152In loving thee thou know'st I am forswornΣε αγαπώ, είμ' επίορκος. Μα εσένα που μου ωρκίσθης
153Cupid laid by his brand and fell asleepʼφησε ο Έρως τον πυρσό στο πλάι κι αποκοιμήθη
154The little Love-god lying once asleepΚοιμόταν κάποτε ο μικρός του έρωτα θεός
« Last Edit: 02 Feb, 2020, 18:23:44 by spiros »



Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 97

How like a winter hath my absence been
From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year!
What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen!
What old December's bareness everywhere!
And yet this time remov'd was summer's time,
The teeming autumn, big with rich increase,
Bearing the wanton burthen of the prime,
Like widow'd wombs after their lords' decease:
Yet this abundant issue seem'd to me
But hope of orphans and unfather'd fruit;
For summer and his pleasures wait on thee,
And thou away, the very birds are mute;
Or if they sing, 'tis with so dull a cheer
That leaves look pale, dreading the winter's near.


Μοιάζει χειμώνας ο καιρός που έχω φύγει
και τη χαρά του χρόνου έχασα, εσένα·
πόσο σκοτάδι έχω νιώσει, πόσα ρίγη,
πόσο Δεκέμβρη σε τοπία ερημωμένα.
Κι ήταν ο απόδημος ο χρόνος καλοκαίρι,
μεστό φθινόπωρο μέσα στο γέννημά του,
που όλο της άνοιξης το λάγνο βάρος φέρει,
σαν μήτρα πλήρης μες στο πένθος του θανάτου.
Τόση πληθώρα, αποκύημα της λύπης
ήταν για μένα, και καρπός χωρίς πατέρα·
το καλοκαίρι ξέρει εσένα, κι όταν λείπεις
όλα σωπαίνουν τα πουλιά στον άδειο αέρα.
Κι αν κελαηδήσουν, λένε πένθιμο κανόνα,
κι ωχρούν τα φύλλα με το φόβο του χειμώνα.


Μετάφραση: Διονύσης Καψάλης


How like a winter hath my absence been
From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year!
What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen!
What old December's bareness everywhere!
And yet this time remov'd was summer's time,
The teeming autumn, big with rich increase,
Bearing the wanton burthen of the prime,
Like widow'd wombs after their lords' decease:
Yet this abundant issue seem'd to me
But hope of orphans and unfather'd fruit;
For summer and his pleasures wait on thee,
And thou away, the very birds are mute;
Or if they sing, 'tis with so dull a cheer
That leaves look pale, dreading the winter's near.


Μοιάζει χειμώνας ο καιρός μακριά από σένα,
Του χρόνου που γοργά περνά, χαρά μου μόνη!
Τι σκοτεινιά έχω νιώσει! όλα παγωμένα.
Τι γύμνια του Δεκέμβρη! καθετί ερημώνει.
Μα ήταν θέρος σα χωρίσαμε οι δύο,
Και γόνιμο φθινόπωρο, καρπούς που κάνει,
Εντός του είχε της άνοιξης λάγνο φορτίο,
Σα μήτρα χήρα που έχει ο κύρης της πεθάνει.
Για μένα όλη αυτή η σοδειά κι η ευεργεσία,
Ελπίδα ορφανού, καρπός χωρίς πατέρα·
Το θέρος είναι στη δική σου υπηρεσία,
Κι αν λείπεις, τα πουλιά σωπαίνουν στον αέρα·
Κι αν κελαηδήσουνε, η αρμονία θλιμμένη,
Η φυλλωσιά χλωμή, χειμώνα λες προσμένει.


Μετάφραση: Ερρίκος Σοφράς


How like a winter hath my absence been
From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year!
What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen!
What old December's bareness everywhere!
And yet this time remov'd was summer's time,
The teeming autumn, big with rich increase,
Bearing the wanton burthen of the prime,
Like widow'd wombs after their lords' decease:
Yet this abundant issue seem'd to me
But hope of orphans and unfather'd fruit;
For summer and his pleasures wait on thee,
And thou away, the very birds are mute;
Or if they sing, 'tis with so dull a cheer
That leaves look pale, dreading the winter's near.


Τι χειμώνας για μένα ήταν που σου ’λειψα,
συ φευγαλέας ζωής χαρά! Τι παγωνιά
αισθάνθηκα, τι σκοτεινές ημέρες έζησα',
τι γέρικη δεκεμβριανή παντού ερημιά!
Κι όμως αυτός ο ωμός καιρός ήταν παχύς
κι ωραίος τρυγητής με πλούσιαν ευφορία,
κατάφορτος εαρινούς χυμούς, βαρύς
σαν μήτρα χήρα στου κυρίου της την κηδεία.
Μα αυτή την άφθονη σοδειά την είδα σαν
ορφανεμένη ελπίδα κι έρμο κάρπισμα,
γιατί χαρές και θέρο εσένα καρτεράν,
κι η απουσία σου κάνει τα πουλιά βουβά,
η αν λαλούν, λαλούν θλιμμένα και τα φύλλα
τρέμουν σαν να ’νιωσαν χειμώνα ανατριχίλα.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας
« Last Edit: 01 Feb, 2020, 10:16:55 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 1

From fairest creatures we desire increase,
That thereby beauty's rose might never die,
But as the riper should by time decease,
His tender heir might bear his memory:
But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes,
Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel,
Making a famine where abundance lies,
Thy self thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel:
Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament,
And only herald to the gaudy spring,
Within thine own bud buriest thy content,
And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding:
Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.


Πανώρια πλάσματα ποθούμε να καρπίζουν,
ώστε ποτέ ο ανθός του Ωραίου να μη χαθεί
παρά, αφού με καιρό τα πιο ώριμα σαπίζουν,
η μνήμη του σ’ αβρόν του διάδοχο ν’ ανθεί.
Μα συ, των ίδιων σου λαμπρών ματιών λατρεία,
καις του εαυτού σου ουσία να συντηράς το φως σου,
και κάνεις να ’ναι πείνα εκεί που ’ν’ αφθονία,
ο ίδιος εχθρός σκληρός για τον γλυκόν εαυτό σου.
Συ που ’σαι τώρα κόσμημα του κόσμου νέο
και μόνο προάγγελος του Μάη του προφαντού,
θάβεις μες στο μπουμπούκι σου ό,τι έχεις ωραίο
και σαν τσιγκούνης νέος σωρεύεις του χαμού.
Σπλαχνίσου τη ζωή, αλλιώς σαν φάουσα άπληστη
τρως της ζωής το δίκιο, ο τάφος λέω και συ.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας, Βούλα Δαμιανάκου


From fairest creatures we desire increase,
That thereby beauty's rose might never die,
But as the riper should by time decease,
His tender heir might bear his memory:
But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes,
Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel,
Making a famine where abundance lies,
Thy self thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel:
Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament,
And only herald to the gaudy spring,
Within thine own bud buriest thy content,
And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding:
Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.


Μακάρι οι νιοι κι ωραίοι πιότεροι να ʼναι,
της ομορφιάς ο ανθός μη μαραθεί –
σαν φύγουνε μια μέρα οι που γερνάνε
στο ταίρι η θύμηση να μη χαθεί.
Μα μες στη φωτεινή σου τη ματιά,
τρώγεσʼ εσύ απʼ τη φλόγα του φωτός σου
κι όπου ήταν πλούτη, η φτώχεια μένει πια –
κακός σου οχτρός, ο ολόγλυκος εαυτός σου.
Εσύ, με την πιο ολόδροσην ειδή
του κόσμου, που άγγελος του θέρους είσαι,
θάβεσʼ εντός σου, αθώο μικρό παιδί
κι όσα κρατείς για σε, τόσα στερείσαι.
Δείξʼ οίχτο ή φάτον πια τον κόσμο αυτόνε:
ο τάφος να τον φάει κι εσύ, γραφτό ʼναι.


Μετάφραση: Παναγιώτης Πάκος
« Last Edit: 31 Jan, 2020, 11:02:43 by spiros »



Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 8


Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?
Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy:
Why lov'st thou that which thou receiv'st not gladly,
Or else receiv'st with pleasure thine annoy?
If the true concord of well-tuned sounds,
By unions married, do offend thine ear,
They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the parts that thou shouldst bear.
Mark how one string, sweet husband to another,
Strikes each in each by mutual ordering;
Resembling sire and child and happy mother,
Who, all in one, one pleasing note do sing:
Whose speechless song being many, seeming one,
Sings this to thee: 'Thou single wilt prove none.'


Ο μουσική, γιατί σε θλίβει η μουσική;
Γλυκό αγαπάει γλυκό, φαιδρό πάει με φαιδρό·
πως προτιμάς ό,τι δε σου ’ναι ευχάριστο, ή
πως καλοδέχεσαι ό,τι σου ’ναι ανιαρό;
Αν συγχορδία σωστή με τόνους ακριβούς,
ζευγαρωμένους ταιριαχτά ενοχλεί τ’ αυτί σου,
μόνον σαν γλυκομάλωμά σου να τ’ ακούς,
που χαλάς μέλος που ’χεις για συμμετοχή σου.
Δες πως μια με άλλη χόρδα γλυκοπαντρεμένη
ρυθμικό αμοιβαίο παιχνίδι αλληλοαχούν
και σαν πατέρας, γιος και μάνα ευτυχισμένη
σαν ένας όλοι έναν σκοπό γλυκολαλούν.
Τραγούδι δίχως λόγια, αχοί πολλοί σαν ένας
σου τραγουδούν, «Εσύ ο μονός είσαι κανένας».


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας, Βούλα Δαμιανάκου


Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?
Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy:
Why lov'st thou that which thou receiv'st not gladly,
Or else receiv'st with pleasure thine annoy?
If the true concord of well-tuned sounds,
By unions married, do offend thine ear,
They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the parts that thou shouldst bear.
Mark how one string, sweet husband to another,
Strikes each in each by mutual ordering;
Resembling sire and child and happy mother,
Who, all in one, one pleasing note do sing:
Whose speechless song being many, seeming one,
Sings this to thee: 'Thou single wilt prove none.'


Εσύ που είσαι μουσική, γιατί θλιμμένα
τη μουσική ακούς; Η χάρη με τη χάρη
κι η γλύκα με τη γλύκα χαίρονται. Κι εσένα
της ηδονής η θλίψη σ’ έχει συνεπάρει;
Ενώσεις ήχων μιας πνοής συγκερασμένης,
κι αν σε προσβάλλει η λεπτή τους αρμονία,
μόνο γλυκά σε αποπαίρνουν, που σημαίνεις
όλα τα μέρη σου σε μια μονοτονία.
Τι αμοιβαία γλύκα χύνουν στον αέρα,
κι η μια χορδή την άλλη δίπλα της δονεί·
όπως πατέρας, γιος και άσμενη μητέρα,
που όλοι ένας, τραγουδούν σαν μια φωνή.
Άρρητος ήχος πολλαπλός και μοιάζει ένας,
σα να σου λέει, «μόνος, γίνεσαι κανένας».


Μετάφραση: Διονύσης Καψάλης
« Last Edit: 31 Jan, 2020, 12:32:23 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 23

As an unperfect actor on the stage,
Who with his fear is put beside his part,
Or some fierce thing replete with too much rage,
Whose strength's abundance weakens his own heart;
So I, for fear of trust, forget to say
The perfect ceremony of love's rite,
And in mine own love's strength seem to decay,
O'ercharged with burthen of mine own love's might.
O! let my looks be then the eloquence
And dumb presagers of my speaking breast,
Who plead for love, and look for recompense,
More than that tongue that more hath more express'd.
O! learn to read what silent love hath writ:
To hear with eyes belongs to love's fine wit.


Σαν ηθοποιός αρχάριος, που επάνω στη σκηνή
τα χάνει από τον φόβο του, ή σαν άγρια κράση
που ξέχειλη από υπέρμετρην οργή
σφίγγεται τόσο που η καρδιά της πάει να σπάσει,
έτσι δυστυχώς ξεχνάω όλον να ειπώ
τον κανόνα του τυπικού του ερωτικού,
κι από τον φόβο που με σφίγγει ξεψυχώ,
πνιγμένος απ' το βάρος πόθου δυνατού.
Ας είναι τα βιβλία μου η ρητορική μου
κι άλαλοι χρησμολόγοι για όσα λέει η καρδιά,
συνήγοροι γι' αγάπη και γι’ ανταμοιβή μου
πιο πολύ απ' όσο πιο πολύ μπορεί η λαλιά.
Ω, διάβασε και νιώσε ό,τι έγραψε έρωτας βουβός:
ο έρωτας με τα μάτια ακούει, γι’ αυτό κι είναι κουφός.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας, Βούλα Δαμιανάκου


As an unperfect actor on the stage,
Who with his fear is put beside his part,
Or some fierce thing replete with too much rage,
Whose strength's abundance weakens his own heart;
So I, for fear of trust, forget to say
The perfect ceremony of love's rite,
And in mine own love's strength seem to decay,
O'ercharged with burthen of mine own love's might.
O! let my looks be then the eloquence
And dumb presagers of my speaking breast,
Who plead for love, and look for recompense,
More than that tongue that more hath more express'd.
O! learn to read what silent love hath writ:
To hear with eyes belongs to love's fine wit.


Όπως ένας αδέξιος θεατρίνος
πʼ όλο ξεχνάει τα λόγια του, αγχωμένος,
και σαν το άγριο, λυσσασμένο χτήνος,
που την καρδιά του τρώει περίσσιο μένος,
έτσι κι εγώ, που νʼ ανοιχτώ φοβάμαι,
ξεχνώ τα λόγια της αγάπης τʼ άγια·
λειωμένος απʼ το εντός μου πάθος, να με,
και με λυγούν βαριά του έρωτα μάγια.
Άσʼ, της καρδιάς μου που φωνάζει, να ʼναι
οι στίχοι μου, λοιπόν, βουβοί αγγέλοι,
κι απόκριση κι αγάπη να ζητάνε
πιότερο απʼ όσα η γλώσσα να πει θέλει.
Μάθʼ όσα ο πόθος μου έχει να σου πει·
τα μάτια σου θʼ ακούνε στη σιωπή.


Μετάφραση: Παναγιώτης Πάκος
« Last Edit: 02 Feb, 2020, 18:20:47 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 66

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Με όλα αυτά απόκαμα, ζητάω να αναπαυτώ στο μνήμα:
Να βλέπω, λέω την αρετή ζητιάνα γεννημένη,
Το κούφιο Τίποτε φαιδρό με κορδωμένο βήμα
Την πίστη την αγνότερη, χυδαία απαρνημένη,
Την τιμημένη Υπεροχή αισχρά παραριγμένη,
Τη Χάρη την παρθενική ωμά ξεπορνεμένη
Την τέλεια Ωραιότητα κακά εξευτελισμένη,
Την Αξία από ανάπηρη κυβέρνηση αχρηστευμένη,
Την Τέχνη από την κρατική εξουσία γλωσσοδεμένη,
Τη Γνώση από την σχολαστική μωρία περιορισμένη
Την πιο απλή αλήθεια, ηλίθια παρανομασμένη
Την Καλοσύνη στην κυρά-Κακία υποταγμένη.
Με όλα αυτά απόκαμα, δεν θέλω πια να ζήσω
Μόνο που την αγάπη μου πεθαίνοντας πρόκειται να αφήσω.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας


Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Κουράστηκα, το θάνατο αποζητάω.
Βλέπω να γίνεται ζητιάνα η αξία
Και το ανάξιο τίποτα στα χρυσά κοιτάω
Και την αγνότερη πίστη στην προδοσία
Και τη λαμπρή τιμή σ’ ανίκανους δοσμένη
Και την άσπιλη αρετή έχουν ατιμάσει
Και την τελειότητα εξευτελισμένη
Και αρχηγία ανάπηρη την ισχύ υποτάσσει
Και την τέχνη φιμωμένη απ’ την εξουσία
Και τη βλακεία σα δόκτωρ τη γνώση να ελέγχει
Και την αλήθεια να τη λεν ανοησία
Και το κακό την καλοσύνη σκλάβα του έχει.
Κουράστηκα, και δε ζητώ άλλο πια να ζήσω,
Μ’ αν φύγω, μόνη την αγάπη μου θ’ αφήσω


Μετάφραση: Ερρίκος Σοφράς


Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Κουράστηκα· το θάνατο να μ' αναπαύσει κράζω:
Αντί να βλέπω εκ γενετής ζητιάνα την αξία,
Αντί του άδειου τίποτα το θρίαμβο να κοιτάζω,
Την πίστη την αγνότατη να ζει την προδοσία,
Και τη χρυσή τιμή αισχρά στην άκρη να τη σπρώχνουν,
Και την παρθενική αρετή άγρια εκπορνευμένη,
Και την ορθή τελειότητα άδικα να τη διώχνουν,
Και την ισχύ απ’ τον κουτσό αρχηγό εμποδισμένη,
Και φιμωμένη απ' τις αρχές την τέχνη· και την τρέλα
Σαν δόκτορα κάθε ταλέντο να χειραγωγεί,
Την καθαρή αλήθεια να τήνε λέν’ αφέλεια,
Και το καλό αιχμάλωτο, τ' άθλιο να υπηρετεί.
Κουράστηκα· να φύγω πια απ' όλ' αυτά εδώ πάνω!
Αλλά θα μείνει η αγάπη μου μόνη της αν πεθάνω.


Μετάφραση: Λένια Ζαφειροπούλου


The poet laments the corruption and dishonesty of the world, from which he desires to be released. This is a sonnet which strikes a chord in almost any age, for it tells the same old story, that graft and influence reign supreme, and that no inherent merit is ever a guarantee of success. For that depends on social structures and conditions already set in place long ago. As often as not they aid and promote the unworthy, the malicious, the wealthy, the incompetent and those who are just good at manipulation of the system.

A parallel passage is found in Hamlet, in the famous ‘To be or not to be’ soliloquy, but Hamlet’s world-weariness springs from rather different causes. However the phrase ‘the spurns that patient merit of the unworthy takes’ is an interesting summary of the complaint of this sonnet. The relevant part of Hamlet’s speech is given below.

From Hamlet’s soliloquy:
Quote
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin?
— Hamlet III.1.69-76.
http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/sonnet/66


Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Lassé de tout, j'invoque le repos de la mort :
lassé de voir le mérite né mendiant,
et la pénurie besoigneuse affublée en drôlerie,
et la foi la plus pure douloureusement violée,
Et l'honneur d'or honteusement déplacé,
et la vertu vierge brutalement prostituée,
et le juste mérite à tort disgracié,
et la force paralysée par un pouvoir boiteux,
Et l'art bâillonné par l'autorité,
et la folie, vêtue en docteur, contrôlant le talent,
et la simple loyauté traitée de simplicité,
et le Bien captif serviteur du capitaine Mal...
Lassé de tout cela, je voudrais m'y soustraire,
si pour mourir je ne devais laisser seul mon amour.


Traduction: François-Victor Hugo


Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Stanco di tutto questo, quiete mortale invoco,
Vedendo il Merito a mendicare nato,
E vuota Nullità gaiamente agghindata,
E pura Fede miseramente tradita,
Ed i più grandi Onori spartiti oscenamente,
E la casta Virtù fatta prostituta,
E retta Perfezione cadere in disgrazia,
E la Forza avvilita da un potere impotente,
E il Genio creativo per legge imbavagliato,
E Follia dottorale opprimere Saggezza,
E creduta Stupidità la Sincera Franchezza,
E il Bene, del Male condottiero, reso schiavo,
Stanco di tutto questo,  da ciò vorrei poter fuggire,
Non fosse che, morendo, lascerei solo il mio amore.


Traduzione: Ferdinando Albeggiani
« Last Edit: 05 Feb, 2020, 17:22:18 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 131

Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art,
As those whose beauties proudly make them cruel;
For well thou know'st to my dear doting heart
Thou art the fairest and most precious jewel.
Yet, in good faith, some say that thee behold,
Thy face hath not the power to make love groan;
To say they err I dare not be so bold,
Although I swear it to myself alone.
And to be sure that is not false I swear,
A thousand groans, but thinking on thy face,
One on another's neck, do witness bear
Thy black is fairest in my judgment's place.
In nothing art thou black save in thy deeds,
And thence this slander, as I think, proceeds.


Τύραννος είσαι, όσο όμορφη είσαι, σαν πολλές
Ωραίες, που σκληρές τις κάνει η ξιπασιά.
Το πιο ακριβό κι ωραίο στολίδι είσαι μαθές
Για τη χαζοερωτεμένη μου καρδιά.
Λεν όμως για την όψη σου, όσοι βλέπουν, πως
Ανίκανη να βγάλει βόγκο απ’ τον καημό.
Να ειπώ ανοιχτά πλανιόνται, τόσο τολμηρός
Δεν είμαι, αν κι όρκο παίρνω μέσα μου γι’ αυτό.
Δεν ψευτορκίζομαι, μα την αλήθεια, αφού
Χιλιάδες βόγκοι μαρτυράν απανωτοί
Πως όταν η όψη σου μου τυραννεί τον νου,
Για μένα η πιο όμορφη είσαι μαύρη καλλονή.
Μαύρη είσαι μόνον σε όσα κάνεις κι απ’ αυτό
Θα βγήκε κι η συκοφαντία αυτή θαρρώ.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας
« Last Edit: 07 Feb, 2020, 21:53:59 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 147

My love is as a fever, longing still
For that which longer nurseth the disease,
Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill,
Th’ uncertain sickly appetite to please.
My reason, the physician to my love,
Angry that his prescriptions are not kept,
Hath left me, and I desperate now approve
Desire is death, which physic did except.
Past cure I am, now reason is past care,
And frantic-mad with evermore unrest;
My thoughts and my discourse as madmen’s are,
At random from the truth vainly expressed:
For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright,
Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.


Η αγάπη μου σαν πυρετός είναι που όλο ποθεί
Αυτό που την αρρώστια της θάλπει και παρατείνει,
Τροφοδοτώντας το κακό μ’ ό,τι το διατηρεί,
Και την στρεβλή μου όρεξη που μια ζητά μια φθίνει.
Κι ο νους μου, του έρωτα γιατρός, φρικτά εξοργισμένος
Που δεν τηρώ τις συνταγές, μακριά μου έχει τρέξει.
Κι εγώ το παραδέχομαι πλέον απελπισμένος:
Χάρος ο πόθος· κι η ιατρική τον έχει απαγορεύσει.
Ετσι αφού ο Νους αδιαφορεί, ανίατος έχω γίνει,
Και σαν παράφρων μαίνομαι· ποτέ δεν ησυχάζω.
Σαν του τρελού είν’ τα λόγια μου, η σκέψη μου μ’ αφήνει·
Μακριά από την αλήθεια πλανιέται ό,τι εκφράζω.
Γιατί σ’ ορκίστηκα όμορφη, σε σκέφτηκα λαμπρή,
Και μαύρη είσαι σα κόλαση· σαν νύχτα σκοτεινή.


Μετάφραση: Λένια Ζαφειροπούλου


My love is as a fever, longing still
For that which longer nurseth the disease,
Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill,
Th’ uncertain sickly appetite to please.
My reason, the physician to my love,
Angry that his prescriptions are not kept,
Hath left me, and I desperate now approve
Desire is death, which physic did except.
Past cure I am, now reason is past care,
And frantic-mad with evermore unrest;
My thoughts and my discourse as madmen’s are,
At random from the truth vainly expressed:
For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright,
Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.


Η αγάπη μου σαν θερμασμένη λαχταράει
ό,τι κρατάει την αρρώστια πιο πολύ,
ζητάει ό,τι αβγαταίνει το κακό να φάει,
να ευχαριστάει όρεξη αμφίβολη, λωβή.
Θυμώνει η κρίση, της αρρώστιας μου ο γιατρός,
αφού δε γίνεται ό,τι ορίζει και μ’ αφήνει
απελπισμένον, με τη γνώση πως χαμός
ο πόθος και η γιατρική τον αποκλείνει.
Ούτε γιατρειά ’χω, ούτε με νοιάζεται κι ο νους
κι αλλοφρενος και πιο ανήσυχος ολοένα
σκέψεις κάνω και λόγια λέω σαν τους τρελούς
μακριά από την αλήθεια, κουτουρού ειπωμένα.
Σου ορκίστηκα πιστός σου, ότι είσαι ωραία, λαμπρή,
κι είσαι μαύρη σαν άδης, νύχτα σκοτεινή.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας
« Last Edit: 01 Feb, 2020, 19:51:54 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 76

Why is my verse so barren of new pride,
So far from variation or quick change?
Why with the time do I not glance aside
To new-found methods, and to compounds strange?
Why write I still all one, ever the same,
And keep invention in a noted weed,
That every word doth almost tell my name,
Showing their birth, and where they did proceed?
O! know sweet love I always write of you,
And you and love are still my argument;
So all my best is dressing old words new,
Spending again what is already spent:
For as the sun is daily new and old,
So is my love still telling what is told.


Γιατί οι στίχοι μου στερούνται νέου κόσμου,
και δεν γεννούν λαμπρές τροπές ή ποικιλμούς;
Γιατί δεν στρέφω όπως στρέφει ο καιρός μου,
σ’ άλλες μεθόδους, σε παράξενους ειρμούς;
Γιατί το ίδιο γράφω πάντα, μόνο ένα,
μες στα καλύτερα γραπτά μου τετριμμένος,
κι όλες οι λέξεις μου σχεδόν δείχνουν εμένα,
λέγοντας όνομα, προέλευση και γένος;
Για σένα λέω πάντα, κι ο δικός μου μύθος
έχει για θέμα του τον έρωτα και σένα·
κι ανακαινίζω τα παλιά με νέο ήθος,
πάλι ξοδεύοντας τα ήδη ξοδεμένα.
Όπως ο ήλιος λάμπει νέος και παλιός,
ο έρωτάς μου ξαναλέγεται κι αλλιώς.


Μετάφραση: Διονύσης Καψάλης


Why is my verse so barren of new pride,
So far from variation or quick change?
Why with the time do I not glance aside
To new-found methods, and to compounds strange?
Why write I still all one, ever the same,
And keep invention in a noted weed,
That every word doth almost tell my name,
Showing their birth, and where they did proceed?
O! know sweet love I always write of you,
And you and love are still my argument;
So all my best is dressing old words new,
Spending again what is already spent:
For as the sun is daily new and old,
So is my love still telling what is told.


Γιατί γυμνή ’ναι η ποίησή μου από λάμψη νέα,
μια ποικιλία, έναν γοργό νεωτερισμό,
πώς δε στραβοκοιτάω να κλέψω κάποια ιδέα
νεοεφευρημένη, σχήμα λόγου χτυπητό;
Τι γράφω όλο τα ίδια, με τον ίδιον τρόπο,
ντύνω τον στίχο μου με μάρκα σημειωμένη,
που η κάθε λέξη τ’ όνομά μου λέει, τον τόπο
που εγεννήθη και για που ’ναι προορισμένη;
Γράφω για σένα, αγάπη μου γλυκιά, σ’ το λέω,
εσύ κι η αγάπη θέμα μου παντοτινό,
λόγια παλιά ’ναι η τέχνη μου με ντύμα νέο
και το σπαταλημένο εκ νέου να σπαταλώ.
Κι ως κάθε ημέρα ο ήλιος νέος και παλιός,
έτσι κι η αγάπη μου λέει ό,τι ειπώθη αλλιώς.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας
« Last Edit: 01 Feb, 2020, 19:47:34 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 130

My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.


Τα μάτια της δεν μοιάζουν με ηλιαχτίδα
κι είναι τα χείλη της χλωμά μπρος στο κοράλλι.
Άμα το χιόνι είναι λευκό, έχει τα στήθη ωχρά·
μαύρα, συρμάτινα μαλλιά έχει στο κεφάλι.
Τριαντάφυλλα έχω δει ολοπόρφυρα,
μα τέτοια δεν θα βρω στα μάγουλά της.
Γεύθηκα αρώματα πολύ τερπνότερα
από τα μύρα που ανασαίνω στα φιλιά της.
Ευφραίνομαι όταν μου μιλάει κι ας ξέρω
πόσο γλυκύτερη είναι η μουσική.
Ποτέ μου δεν αντίκρισα θεά να περπατά,
μα αυτή βαδίζοντας πατάει στη γη.
Τόσο όμως στη ζωή μου βασιλεύει,
που κάθε σύγκριση άλλη περιττεύει.
Τόσο όμως τη ζωή μου κυβερνά,
που ανούσια τ' άλλα μοιάζουν. Και κενά.


Μετάφραση: Κώστας Κουτσουρέλης


My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.


Τα μάτια της καλής μου με ήλιο δα δε μοιάζουν,
κι ούτε είναι κοραλλένια τα γλυκά της χείλια,
μπρος στ’ άσπρο του χιονιού τα στήθια της χλωμιάζουν,
κι ο πλούτος τα μαλλιά της όμοια μαύρα τέλια.
Τριαντάφυλλα ασπροκόκκινα έχω ιδεί, αλλά
όχι στα μάγουλά της κι έχω μυριστεί
κάμποσ’ αρώματα πολύ πιο ευχάριστα
παρά το μύρο απ’ της καλής μου την πνοή.
Η γλώσσα της μ’ αρέσει, μα της μουσικής
ο αχός, το ξέρω, είναι πολύ πιο θελχτικός.
Ομολογώ θεά δεν έχω ιδεί πάνω στη γη,
η αγάπη μου όμως περπατάει στο έδαφος.
Και όμως, μα το ναι, η καλή μου είν’ έτσι σπάνια,
σαν κάθε ψεύτρα που συγκρίνεται με ουράνια.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας
« Last Edit: 01 Feb, 2020, 19:50:05 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 2

When forty winters shall besiege thy brow,
And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field,
Thy youth's proud livery so gazed on now,
Will be a totter'd weed of small worth held:
Then being asked, where all thy beauty lies,
Where all the treasure of thy lusty days;
To say, within thine own deep sunken eyes,
Were an all-eating shame, and thriftless praise.
How much more praise deserv'd thy beauty's use,
If thou couldst answer 'This fair child of mine
Shall sum my count, and make my old excuse,'
Proving his beauty by succession thine!
This were to be new made when thou art old,
And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold.


Σαρανταχείμωνο όταν ζώσει τη θωριά σου
και σκάψει τάφρους στην αβρή σου, λεία μορφή,
η αγέρωχη στολή της νιότης, η ομορφιά σου,
τότε θα ναι ξερά χορτάρια, συριπή.
Τότε αν ρωτήσουν πού ’ν’ τα κάλλη σου θαμμένα,
που ’ν’ ολοι οι θησαυροί της σφριγηλής σου νιότης,
και ειπείς μέσα στα μάτια σου τα γουβιασμένα,
θα ναι αίσχος σου το τέλος κι ο ύμνος σου προδότης
Μα τι ύμνους θ’ άξιζ’ η ομορφιά σου αν, ξοδεμένη,
θ’ αποκρινόταν: «τούτ’ το τέκνο είν’ από μένα,
θα κλείσει τον λογαριασμό που ’μαι χρεωμένη»,
με απόδειξη το κάλλος που ’λαβε από σένα.
θα ’νιωθες τότε νέο το γέρικο σου βλέμμα,
ζεστό ξανά θα σου ’σφυζε το κρύο σου αίμα.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας, Βούλα Δαμιανάκου


When forty winters shall besiege thy brow,
And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field,
Thy youth's proud livery so gazed on now,
Will be a totter'd weed of small worth held:
Then being asked, where all thy beauty lies,
Where all the treasure of thy lusty days;
To say, within thine own deep sunken eyes,
Were an all-eating shame, and thriftless praise.
How much more praise deserv'd thy beauty's use,
If thou couldst answer 'This fair child of mine
Shall sum my count, and make my old excuse,'
Proving his beauty by succession thine!
This were to be new made when thou art old,
And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold.


Όταν σαράντα χειμωνιές δείρουν το μέτωπο σου,
Κι αυλάκια σκάψουν στον αγρό, βαθιά, της ομορφιά σου,
Αυτή της νιότης σου η λαμπρή στολή, που βλέπω τώρα,
Τριμμένο ρούχο θα γενεί με λίγη αξία, στοχάσου.
Και τότε, αν σε ρωτήσουν πού πήγε η ομορφιά σου,
Των ανθισμένων σου ημερών όλος ο θησαυρός
Θα δουν μέσα στα μάτια σου, που θα ‘ναι βουλιαγμένα
Του μαρασμού σου τη ντροπή για έπαινό σου.
Μα πόσους επαίνους θα άξιζε της ομορφιάς σου η χρήση,
Αν θα μπορούσες να έλεγες: Το όμορφο αυτό παιδί μου
Την ηλικία μου συγχωρεί, το χρέος μου ξεπληρώνιε,
Τα νιάτα κληρονόμησε και την ωραία μορφή μου.
Το νέο πλάσμα θα αυτό, όταν εσύ παλιώεις,
Το κρύο τότε το αίμα σου, θερμός σε αυτό θα νιώσεις.


Μετάφραση: Βάσος Χανιώτης
« Last Edit: 02 Feb, 2020, 18:07:45 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 94

They that have power to hurt and will do none,
That do not do the thing they most do show,
Who, moving others, are themselves as stone,
Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow:
They rightly do inherit heaven's graces
And husband nature's riches from expense;
They are the lords and owners of their faces,
Others but stewards of their excellence.
The summer's flower is to the summer sweet
Though to itself it only live and die,
But if that flower with base infection meet,
The basest weed outbraves his dignity:
For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;
Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.


Αυτοί που ενώ μπορούν να βλάψουν δεν προβαίνουν
να κάνουν όσα επιδειχτικά απειλούν,
που άλλους συγκινούν κι αυτοί σαν πέτρες μένουν,
ήμεροι, κρύοι κι αργούν πολύ να πειραχτούν,
με δίκιο τους σ’ αυτούς οι ουράνιες χάρες παν,
της φύσης πλούτη οικονομούν απ’ τη σπατάλη,
στα πρόσωπά τους κύριοι και τα κυβερνάν,
κι είναι διαχειριστές στις αρχοντιές τους οι άλλοι.
Το θερινό άνθος γλύκα θερινή μας δίνει,
το ίδιο τι έχει, μόνο ανθίζει και πεθαίνει1
μ’ αν ίσως το άνθος κακιά λώβη το μολύνει,
το πιο παλιόχορτο σ’ αξία του παραβγαίνει.
Και τα γλυκύτερα απ’ τα έργα τους πικρίζουν,
κρίνα σάπια από χόρτα πιο άσκημα μυρίζουν.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας


They that have power to hurt and will do none,
That do not do the thing they most do show,
Who, moving others, are themselves as stone,
Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow:
They rightly do inherit heaven's graces
And husband nature's riches from expense;
They are the lords and owners of their faces,
Others but stewards of their excellence.
The summer's flower is to the summer sweet
Though to itself it only live and die,
But if that flower with base infection meet,
The basest weed outbraves his dignity:
For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;
Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.


Αυτοί που δύνανται να βλάψουν μα αρνούνται να πράξουν
Ότι του είναι εύκολο και μπορετό,
ενώ άλλους συγκινούν, μένοντας παγεροί,
απρόθυμοι στον πειρασμό
Δικαίως απολαμβάνουν του ουρανού την ευλογία
Κι από τον χαμό της φύσης τα καλά τα συγκρατούνε
Τους παρουσιαστικού τους ιδιοκτήτες αυτοί και βασιλιάδες
Ενώ λακέδες οι υπόλοιποι στην αρχοντιά τους θα είναι
Του θέρους λούλουδο γλυκά το θέρος νοστιμίζει
Παρόλο που μονάχο ζει και μοναχό πεθαίνει
Όμως αν τύχει μόλυνση το άνθος να δεκατίζει
Και το παλιόχορτο στο κάλλος του το παραβγαίνει
Γιατί στις πράξεις τους μπορεί και τα άξια να σαπίσουν
Και σάπιοι κρίνοι πιο πολύ από χόρτα να βρωμίσουν


Μετάφραση: Άγνωστος (από το περιοδικό «Νέα Εστία», 15 Ιουνίου 1964)

Απόσπασμα σε απόδοση Διονύση Καψάλη:
Quote
γλυκό το άνθος για την άνοιξη, που ωστόσο
καθ’ εαυτό μονάχα ζει κι απλώς πεθαίνει
μα όταν πάλι μολυνθεί με κάποια νόσο,
κι ένα χορτάρι ταπεινό το υπερβαίνει:
στις πράξεις πάντα και τα πιο γλυκά πικρίζουν
όζουν χειρότερα οι κρίνοι που σαπίζουν
« Last Edit: 05 Feb, 2020, 17:23:31 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 53

What is your substance, whereof are you made,
That millions of strange shadows on you tend?
Since every one hath, every one, one shade,
And you but one, can every shadow lend.
Describe Adonis, and the counterfeit
Is poorly imitated after you;
On Helen's cheek all art of beauty set,
And you in Grecian tires are painted new:
Speak of the spring, and foison of the year,
The one doth shadow of your beauty show,
The other as your bounty doth appear;
And you in every blessed shape we know.
In all external grace you have some part,
But you like none, none you, for constant heart.


Με τι ουσία, τι υλικό πλασμένος είσαι συ
που σου ταιριάζουν άπειρες, αλλούταιρες κοψιές;
Κάθε μορφή έχει μόνον μια δική της μια γραμμή,
μα στη μορφή σου, ενώ ’ναι μια, πάνε όλες οι γραμμές.
Περίγραψε τον Άδωνη και το είδωλο του νέου,
μόνο φτωχιά απομίμηση θά ’ναι της ομορφιάς σου,
βάλε για Ελένης μάγουλο την τέχνη όλη του Ωραίου
και να τη μες σε φορεσιά ελληνική η θωριά σου.
Μίλησε για την άνοιξη, τη θερινή εσοδεία·
το πρώτο μόνον τη σκιά τού κάλλους σου θα δώσει,
το άλλο μόνον θα φανεί δική σου αφθονία.
Ό,τι γνωστό μας σχήμα ωραίο σε σένα θα εφαρμόσει.
Η κάθε χάρη προφαντή κάτι από σε ’χει πάρει
μα συ δε μοιάζεις με καμιά, καμιά με σε στη χάρη.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας

The poet appears to be delving into the realms of Neo-Platonic metaphysiscs. The theory is that most of our experience is merely a shadow of reality. True or real existence is that of ideals, or ideal substances and forms. Every ideal or form has its shadow in the material world, and it is with the shadows that our senses have contact. All material things derive their shape and existence from these forms and therefore have something of the ideal in them, but it is only a severely restricted and cramped version of the ideal. Only the spiritual mind can grasp the true essence of things.

Yet here the beloved seems to be almost the universal ideal which gives form to all substance, since whatever lovely thing one might think of that appears in the world, he outdistances them all and gives them light and informs them with himself.

The poet therefore marvels at this fact, and sees within the beloved all the beauties of the old world inspired and given life, as it were, by him alone.The conclusion is somewhat at variance with some of the other critical sonnets, such as 33-5, 40-2 etc. It may be that the reference is to the enduring quality of the ideal Platonic form, which is essentially eternal and unchanging. Or it may be that all in the past is now forgiven and seen in a roseate light, the poet forcing this conclusion upon himself in deference to overpowering love, and as a means of overcoming pain. For it is the tradition of sonneteering that all cruelties by the beloved must be forgiven by the lover.
http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/sonnet/53
« Last Edit: 05 Feb, 2020, 11:05:13 by spiros »


Offline spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 792082
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Sonnet 77

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book, this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look what thy memory cannot contain,
Commit to these waste blanks, and thou shalt find
Those children nursed, delivered from thy brain,
To take a new acquaintance of thy mind.
These offices, so oft as thou wilt look,
Shall profit thee and much enrich thy book.


Στον καθρέφτη θα ιδείς να ρεύουν οι ομορφιές σου
και στο ρολόι στιγμές να χάνονται ακριβές,
στ’ άδεια αυτά φύλλα τυπωμένες τις ιδέες σου
κι απ’ το βιβλίο αυτό θα διδαχτείς μαθές.
Οι ζάρες που πιστά ο καθρέφτης θα σου δείξει
θα σου θυμίσουν τάφων στόματα ανοιχτά
κι η σβέλτη σκιά της ώρας θέα θα σου ανοίξει
στα αιώνια βήματα του χρόνου τα κλεφτά.
Μα ό,τι η μνήμη δε μπορεί να συγκρατήσει
μπιστέψου το στην άσπρη ετούτην ερημιά,
τα τέκνα του μυαλού σου θα τα γαλουχήσει
να κάμεις νέα του πνεύματός σου γνωριμιά.
Αυτή σου η δούλεψη όποτε τον νου σου εγγίζει
θα σ’ ωφελεί και το βιβλίο σου θα πλουτίζει.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας

This is one of the sequence of climacteric sonnets, 49, 63, 77, 81, 126, 154, all of which deal with the demise of love, life, youth and beauty, either for the poet, or the beloved, or both. This one is less dramatic than the others, in that it finds an occasion for encouraging the youth to record his thoughts, for moral improvement at a later date, and does not insist that the final destruction is immanent or an object of all-pervasive fear and loathing. The tameness of the conclusion almost allows one to believe that, reading the divine offices, the breviary of former thoughts on mortality, in some quiet nook, could go on for ever and that no one need ever die.
http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/sonnet/77


 

Search Tools