Sonnet 111 (William Shakespeare) | Σονέτο 111 (Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ) [O! for my sake do you with Fortune chide: Ω μάλωσε την τύχη, αυτή η θεά είν’ αιτία]

spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 812016
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
Sonnet 111 (William Shakespeare) | Σονέτο 111 (Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ) [O! for my sake do you with Fortune chide: Ω μάλωσε την τύχη, αυτή η θεά είν’ αιτία]


O! for my sake do you with Fortune chide,
The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds,
That did not better for my life provide
Than public means which public manners breeds.
Thence comes it that my name receives a brand,
And almost thence my nature is subdued
To what it works in, like the dyer's hand:
Pity me, then, and wish I were renewed;
Whilst, like a willing patient, I will drink
Potions of eisel 'gainst my strong infection;
No bitterness that I will bitter think,
Nor double penance, to correct correction.
Pity me then, dear friend, and I assure ye,
Even that your pity is enough to cure me.


Ω μάλωσε την τύχη, αυτή η θεά είν’ αιτία
για τα κακά μου τα έργα, που δε μου ’δωσε άλλη
καλύτερη ζωή, παρά μιαν εργασία
κοινή, που τρόπους βέβαια κοινούς προβάλλει.
Τ’ όνομά μου απ’ αυτό ’χει στίγμα με φωτιά
κι η φύση μου μ’ αυτό σχεδόν συμμορφωθεί
στην εργασία της, σαν το χέρι του βαφιά.
Γι’ αυτό λυπήσου με κι ευχήσου μου αλλαγή,
θα πίνω ξίδια μ’ όλη μου την προθυμία
να φύγει η κακιά λώβη μου, χωρίς να πω
πικρή την πίκρα είτε βαριά την τιμωρία,
μόνο να γιάνω και καλά να διορθωθώ.
Γι' αυτό λυπήσου με, ακριβέ μου φίλε, φτάνει,
σε βεβαιώνω, η λύπη σου για να με γιάνει.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας

This sonnet continues the poet's defence of his conduct, which on the surface looks bad. It has brought him shame and disgrace and a swerving away from his beloved. However he decides to put most, if not all the blame upon fortune, which has not provided him with noble birth or wealth, with the result that he must ply his wares in the market place.
http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/sonnet/111




 

Search Tools