Sonnet 124 (William Shakespeare) | Σονέτο 124 (Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ) [If my dear love were but the child of state: Αν ήταν η αγάπη μου μόνο της εύνοιας το παιδί]

spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 812016
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
Sonnet 124 (William Shakespeare) | Σονέτο 124 (Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ) [If my dear love were but the child of state: Αν ήταν η αγάπη μου μόνο της εύνοιας το παιδί]


If my dear love were but the child of state,
It might for Fortune's bastard be unfathered,
As subject to Time's love or to Time's hate,
Weeds among weeds, or flowers with flowers gathered.
No, it was builded far from accident;
It suffers not in smiling pomp, nor falls
Under the blow of thralled discontent,
Whereto th' inviting time our fashion calls:
It fears not policy, that heretic,
Which works on leases of short-number'd hours,
But all alone stands hugely politic,
That it nor grows with heat, nor drowns with showers.
To this I witness call the fools of time,
Which die for goodness, who have lived for crime.


Αν ήταν η αγάπη μου μόνο της εύνοιας το παιδί,
μπορεί σαν μπάσταρδο της Τύχης να ’μενε ορφανό
και, κατά του καιρού την έχτρα ή τη στοργή,
χόρτο με χόρτα, ή άνθος με άνθη, στον σωρό.
Όχι, μακριά από ατύχημα είναι στεριωμένη,
δεν πάσχει από χαμογελούσα αλαζονεία,
ούτε από δουλική δυσμένεια χτυπημένη
πέφτει, όταν το καλούν η μόδα κι η ευκαιρία.
Πολιτική δεν την τραβάει, η αιρετική,
που εργάζεται με μικροπρόθεσμα όρια, ώρες,
παρά ’ναι, μόνη αυτή, η τρανή πολιτική
που δεν τη θρέφει ζέστη, δεν την πνίγουν μπόρες.
Σ’ αυτό τη λόξα του καιρού για μάρτυρα καλώ
που για καλό πεθαίνει, αφού έχει ζήσει για κακό.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας

This sonnet continues with the theme of the superiority of a love which is independent of all normal human conventions, and does not seek the favour or approval of kings, princes, states, politicians, times or fashions. It stands above them all and is secure in the knowledge that it is out of reach of any of them, however malicious, erratic, irrational or unpredictable they might be. The contrast is drawn between this love and the love which is perjured, partial, and dependent on court favours, or on the politics of the time. Such debased loves, or those who indulge in them, are time's fools and are the sport of every wind that blows and every rain that falls. But not so for this true love, which remains constant and steadfast, and will outlive the pyramids and time itself.
http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/sonnet/124




 

Search Tools