Sonnet 125 (William Shakespeare) | Σονέτο 125 (Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ) [Were't aught to me I bore the canopy: Τι πιο καλό, να σου βαστάω τον ουρανό]

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Sonnet 125 (William Shakespeare) | Σονέτο 125 (Ουίλλιαμ Σαίξπηρ) [Were't aught to me I bore the canopy: Τι πιο καλό, να σου βαστάω τον ουρανό]


Were't aught to me I bore the canopy,
With my extern the outward honouring,
Or laid great bases for eternity,
Which proves more short than waste or ruining?
Have I not seen dwellers on form and favour
Lose all and more by paying too much rent
For compound sweet, forgoing simple savour,
Pitiful thrivers, in their gazing spent?
No; let me be obsequious in thy heart,
And take thou my oblation, poor but free,
Which is not mixed with seconds, knows no art,
But mutual render, only me for thee.
Hence, thou suborned informer! a true soul
When most impeached stands least in thy control.


Τι πιο καλό, να σου βαστάω τον ουρανό
τιμώντας με τ’ απόξω μου το θέαμα, ή
να θεμελιώσω βάση για όλον τον καιρό
και πέρα από ερείπια και καταστροφή;
Δεν είδα λάτρες του έξω κάλλους να τα χάσουν
όλα τους κι άλλα, δίνοντας πάρα πολλά
για γλύκες σύνθετες, τη γέψη να ξεχάσουν
άθλιοι πλούσιοι, χαμένοι στα ρηχά;
Όχι, είμαι της καρδιάς σου ικέτης, που προσφέρω
φτωχό, μα απ’ την καρδιά μου πρόσφορο, ένα κι ένα
όχι σμιγάδι δεύτερο, ούτε τέχνες ξέρω,
μόνο να δώσω και να πάρω, εμέ για σένα.
Χάσου, κακόγλωσσα! Όσο ψέγεις μια πιστή
καρδιά, τόσο από σένα πιο άτρωτη είν’ αυτή.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας

This is effectively the final sonnet to the youth, the next one being a sort of envoi or farewell sonnet. It is linked closely to the two preceding ones, and echoes their ideas. Critics have also picked out two closely related texts which seem to have a bearing on this sonnet. Part of the first scene of Othello contains many verbal echoes. The following words and phrases are relevant: second, forms and visages of duty, thrive, obsequious, outward, extern. The full extract is printed at the end of the page. The second text is the Communion Service from The Book of Common Prayer, (1559) of which the portions significant in this context are printed below. (A link is also given to the complete text).
http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/sonnet/125




 

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