William Shakespeare, Sonnet 66 (Tired with all these, for restful death I cry / Με όλα αυτά απόκαμα, ζητάω να αναπαυτώ στο μνήμα)

spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 812632
    • Gender:Male
  • point d’amour
Sonnet 66

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Με όλα αυτά απόκαμα, ζητάω να αναπαυτώ στο μνήμα:
Να βλέπω, λέω την αρετή ζητιάνα γεννημένη,
Το κούφιο Τίποτε φαιδρό με κορδωμένο βήμα
Την πίστη την αγνότερη, χυδαία απαρνημένη,
Την τιμημένη Υπεροχή αισχρά παραριγμένη,
Τη Χάρη την παρθενική ωμά ξεπορνεμένη
Την τέλεια Ωραιότητα κακά εξευτελισμένη,
Την Αξία από ανάπηρη κυβέρνηση αχρηστευμένη,
Την Τέχνη από την κρατική εξουσία γλωσσοδεμένη,
Τη Γνώση από την σχολαστική μωρία περιορισμένη
Την πιο απλή αλήθεια, ηλίθια παρανομασμένη
Την Καλοσύνη στην κυρά-Κακία υποταγμένη.
Με όλα αυτά απόκαμα, δεν θέλω πια να ζήσω
Μόνο που την αγάπη μου πεθαίνοντας πρόκειται να αφήσω.


Μετάφραση: Βασίλης Ρώτας


Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Κουράστηκα, το θάνατο αποζητάω.
Βλέπω να γίνεται ζητιάνα η αξία
Και το ανάξιο τίποτα στα χρυσά κοιτάω
Και την αγνότερη πίστη στην προδοσία
Και τη λαμπρή τιμή σ’ ανίκανους δοσμένη
Και την άσπιλη αρετή έχουν ατιμάσει
Και την τελειότητα εξευτελισμένη
Και αρχηγία ανάπηρη την ισχύ υποτάσσει
Και την τέχνη φιμωμένη απ’ την εξουσία
Και τη βλακεία σα δόκτωρ τη γνώση να ελέγχει
Και την αλήθεια να τη λεν ανοησία
Και το κακό την καλοσύνη σκλάβα του έχει.
Κουράστηκα, και δε ζητώ άλλο πια να ζήσω,
Μ’ αν φύγω, μόνη την αγάπη μου θ’ αφήσω


Μετάφραση: Ερρίκος Σοφράς


Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Κουράστηκα· το θάνατο να μ' αναπαύσει κράζω:
Αντί να βλέπω εκ γενετής ζητιάνα την αξία,
Αντί του άδειου τίποτα το θρίαμβο να κοιτάζω,
Την πίστη την αγνότατη να ζει την προδοσία,
Και τη χρυσή τιμή αισχρά στην άκρη να τη σπρώχνουν,
Και την παρθενική αρετή άγρια εκπορνευμένη,
Και την ορθή τελειότητα άδικα να τη διώχνουν,
Και την ισχύ απ’ τον κουτσό αρχηγό εμποδισμένη,
Και φιμωμένη απ' τις αρχές την τέχνη· και την τρέλα
Σαν δόκτορα κάθε ταλέντο να χειραγωγεί,
Την καθαρή αλήθεια να τήνε λέν’ αφέλεια,
Και το καλό αιχμάλωτο, τ' άθλιο να υπηρετεί.
Κουράστηκα· να φύγω πια απ' όλ' αυτά εδώ πάνω!
Αλλά θα μείνει η αγάπη μου μόνη της αν πεθάνω.


Μετάφραση: Λένια Ζαφειροπούλου


The poet laments the corruption and dishonesty of the world, from which he desires to be released. This is a sonnet which strikes a chord in almost any age, for it tells the same old story, that graft and influence reign supreme, and that no inherent merit is ever a guarantee of success. For that depends on social structures and conditions already set in place long ago. As often as not they aid and promote the unworthy, the malicious, the wealthy, the incompetent and those who are just good at manipulation of the system.

A parallel passage is found in Hamlet, in the famous ‘To be or not to be’ soliloquy, but Hamlet’s world-weariness springs from rather different causes. However the phrase ‘the spurns that patient merit of the unworthy takes’ is an interesting summary of the complaint of this sonnet. The relevant part of Hamlet’s speech is given below.

From Hamlet’s soliloquy:
Quote
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin?
— Hamlet III.1.69-76.
http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/sonnet/66


Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Lassé de tout, j'invoque le repos de la mort :
lassé de voir le mérite né mendiant,
et la pénurie besoigneuse affublée en drôlerie,
et la foi la plus pure douloureusement violée,
Et l'honneur d'or honteusement déplacé,
et la vertu vierge brutalement prostituée,
et le juste mérite à tort disgracié,
et la force paralysée par un pouvoir boiteux,
Et l'art bâillonné par l'autorité,
et la folie, vêtue en docteur, contrôlant le talent,
et la simple loyauté traitée de simplicité,
et le Bien captif serviteur du capitaine Mal...
Lassé de tout cela, je voudrais m'y soustraire,
si pour mourir je ne devais laisser seul mon amour.


Traduction: François-Victor Hugo


Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.


Stanco di tutto questo, quiete mortale invoco,
Vedendo il Merito a mendicare nato,
E vuota Nullità gaiamente agghindata,
E pura Fede miseramente tradita,
Ed i più grandi Onori spartiti oscenamente,
E la casta Virtù fatta prostituta,
E retta Perfezione cadere in disgrazia,
E la Forza avvilita da un potere impotente,
E il Genio creativo per legge imbavagliato,
E Follia dottorale opprimere Saggezza,
E creduta Stupidità la Sincera Franchezza,
E il Bene, del Male condottiero, reso schiavo,
Stanco di tutto questo,  da ciò vorrei poter fuggire,
Non fosse che, morendo, lascerei solo il mio amore.


Traduzione: Ferdinando Albeggiani


« Last Edit: 30 Jun, 2020, 16:23:24 by spiros »


 

Search Tools