Author Topic: supinum -> σουπίνο, ύπτιο  (Read 5412 times)

spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 398827
  • Gender: Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • 102094522373850556729
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
supinum -> σουπίνο, ύπτιο
« on: 30 Nov, 2010, 16:38:42 »
supinum -> σουπίνο

σουπίνο το [supíno] O39 : (γραμμ.) ρηματικό ουσιαστικό της λατινικής γλώσσας, το οποίο απαντά σε δύο μόνο τύπους (πτώσεις), σε -um (αιτιατική), όταν συντάσσεται με ρήμα που σημαίνει κίνηση, για να δηλωθεί ο σκοπός, και σε -u (αφαιρετική), όταν συντάσσεται με επίθετο, για να δηλωθεί η αναφορά. [λόγ. < λατ. supin(um) -ον]


Όντας δε translation είναι και για άλλον έναν λόγο μεταφορά – τουλάχιστον στον αγγλόφωνο κόσμο, μιας και η λέξη αυτή που αυθαιρέτως και συμβατικώς τη μεταφράζουμε στα ελληνικά ως μετάφραση, στην πρωτοτυπία της σημαίνει μεταφορά, μιας και παράγεται από το translatum, από το σουπίνο δηλαδή του λατινελληνικής καταγωγής ρήματος transfero, που σημαίνει μεταφέρω.
« Last Edit: 01 Dec, 2010, 14:02:19 by wings »


valeon

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13951
  • Gender: Male
  • Κώστας Βαλεοντής <Φυσική, Tηλ/νίες, ΙΤ, Ορολογία>
    • ΕΛΕΤΟ
Re: supinum -> σουπίνο
« Reply #1 on: 01 Dec, 2010, 02:09:37 »
To supinum είναι ουσιαστικοποιημένο ουδέτερο του επιθέτου supinus, -a, -um = ύπτιος, ανάσκελος.  Γι' αυτό στα ελληνικά λέγεται και ύπτιο (Λατινική Γραμματική Α. Τζαρτζάνου)

spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 398827
  • Gender: Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • 102094522373850556729
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Re: supinum -> σουπίνο, ύπτιο
« Reply #2 on: 01 Dec, 2010, 17:55:16 »
Καλό, δεν το γνώριζα :)


spiros

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 398827
  • Gender: Male
  • point d’amour
    • spiros.doikas
    • greektranslator
    • doikas
    • 102094522373850556729
    • lavagraph
    • Greek translator CV
Re: supinum -> σουπίνο, ύπτιο
« Reply #3 on: 01 Jun, 2011, 16:51:36 »
In Latin there are two supines, I (first) and II (second). They are originally the accusative and dative or ablative forms of a verbal noun in the fourth declension, respectively. The first supine ends in -um. It has two uses. The first is with verbs of motion and indicates purpose. For example, "Gladiatores adfuerunt pugnatum" is Latin for "The gladiators have come to fight", and "Nuntii gratulatum et cubitum venerunt" is Latin for "The messengers came to congratulate and to sleep." The second usage is in the Future Passive Infinitive, for example "amatum iri" means "to be about to be loved". It mostly appears in indirect statements, for example "credidit se necatum iri", meaning "he thought that he was going to be killed".
The second supine can be used with adjectives but it is rarely used and only a small number of verbs traditionally take it. It is derived from the dativus finalis which expresses purpose or the ablativus respectivus which indicates in what respect. It is the same as the first supine minus the final -m and with lengthened "u". "Mirabile dictū", for example, means "amazing to say", where dictū is a supine form.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supine

Supinum modus verbi est. Indicat intentionem vel solutionem actus animo agitati.
In Lingua Latina duo sunt tempora supini:
http://la.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supinum


https://www.translatum.gr/forum/index.php?topic=204146.0
« Last Edit: 23 Oct, 2017, 19:41:19 by spiros »